Cybersecurity

Legal and Policy Dimensions of Cybersecurity

Sponsored by the Penn State Institute for Information Policy, the George Washington School of Media & Public Affairs, Penn State Law and the Journal of Information Policy

A by-invitation experts’ workshop to be held at
George Washington University School of Media and Public Affairs
September 28-29, 2016

Tuesday, Sept. 27

7:00 PM  Welcome Gathering: Bier Baron, 1523 22nd St NW, Washington, DC

Wednesday, Sept. 28

9:00-9:15 Welcome, introductions, opening comments, workshop logistics: Amit Schejter, BGU-IL and IIP/JIP; Krishna Jayakar, IIP/JIP; Anne McKenna, Penn State Law; Matt Hindman, George Washington University

Part I:  Frameworks

9:15-10:15 Session I: A framework for the analysis of Internet security – David Clark, MIT
Respondent: Prof. Henning Schulzrinne, Chief Technology Officer, FCC

10:15-10:30  Coffee Break

10:30-11:30 Session II: Broadband Industry Structure and Cybersecurity – Carolyn Gideon, Tufts University and Christiaan Hogendorn, Wesleyan University
Respondent: Prof. Katja Seim, Chief Economist, FCC
11:30-12:30 Session III: How should the limits of governmental access to personal data stored in the cloud be defined? – Tom Brier, Penn State
Respondent:

12:30-1:00 Lunch

Part II:  Civil Liberties

1:00-2:00 Session IV: The Impact of the War of Terror on Freedom of Speech in the Internet Era – Ofer Raban, University of Oregon
Respondent:

2:00-3:00 Keynote presentation: The Honorable Thomas I. Vanaskie, Circuit Judge for The United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit

3:00-3:15 Coffee break

3:15-4:15 Session V: Digital Feudalism in the Age of Contentious Spectrum Allocation and post-Snowden Surveillance: Technological Liberation vs. Control. – Sascha Meinrath, Penn State
Respondent: Matt Hindman – George Washington University


4:15-5:15 Session VI: Avoiding NSA Internet Surveillance Due to Boomerang Routing: IXmaps and Canadian Network Sovereignty – Jonathan Obar, York University and Andrew Clement, University of Toronto
Respondent: Jonathan Mayer, Chief Technologist, Enforcement Bureau, FCC

Part III:  Framing cybersecurity

5:15-6:15 Session VII: Cyber Pearl Harbor: Analogy, Fear, and the Framing of Cybersecurity Threats in the United States, 1991-2016 – Sean Lawson and Michael Middleton, University of Utah
Respondent:

7:30   Dinner: DC Commons - 2200 Pennsylvania Ave NW Washington, DC

Thursday, September 29


9:00-10:00 Session VIII: Kill Switches, Remote Deletion, and Intelligent Agents: Framing Everyday Household Cybersecurity in the Internet of Things – Jo Ann Oravec, University of Wisconsin at Whitewater
Respondent: Ben Cramer, Penn State

Part III:  International and transnational implications:

10:00-11:00 Session IX: The Cyber Security Implications of the Application of Blockchain Technology to Digital Identity, in the Context of United Nations’ SDG 16.9 – Clare Sullivan, Georgetown University
Respondent:

11:00-11:15  Coffee Break

11:15-12:15 Session X: Voice Phishing in South Korea: Chinese “Criminals,” Migratory Trajectories, and Transnational Techno-crimes - Claire Seungeun Lee, University of Massachusetts Boston
Respondent:

12:15-1:00 Lunch

Part IV:  Economic perspectives

1:30-2:30 Session XI: Attack-Deterring and Damage-Control Investments in Cybersecurity – Wynne Lam, University of Liege
Respondent: Brandon Valeriano - Cardiff University, School of Law and Politics & Donald Bren Chair of Armed Politics Marine Corps University

2:30-3:30 Session XII: Understanding Cyber Collateral Damage - Sasha Romanosky, RAND and Zachary Goldman, Center on Law and Security
Respondent: Allan Friedman, Director of Cybersecurity Initiatives, NTIA

3:30-3:45  Coffee Break

3:45-4:45 Session XIII: Devising Effective Economic Policies for Bug-Bounty Platforms and Security Vulnerability Discovery - Aron Laszka, Mingyi Zhao, Jens Grossklags, Penn State
Respondent: Emily Talaga, Chief Economist, Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau, FCC

4:45-5:30 Guest speaker: Rear Admiral (ret.) David Simpson Chief of the FCC's Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau

5:30   Closing remarks and farewells

Broadband Research in a Changing World

Broadband Research in a Changing World:
New Technologies, Ideologies and Priorities

A by-invitation experts’ workshop to be held at
American University Washington College of Law,
Washington DC, September 10, 2017

 

Broadband is now widely accepted as an essential infrastructure for the information economy. Billions of dollars in private industry investments supplemented by targeted universal access subsidies have now enabled 73 percent of American households to subscribe to broadband. Yet, some communities and demographic groups have experienced gaps in access and usage that have persisted over time and multiple generations of technology. The diffusion of advanced broadband networks and services has sometimes widened these gaps to the detriment of the economic competitiveness, ability to access basic social and educational resources, and democratic participation of individuals and communities. Consequently, there is continuing need for both policy-makers and the academic research community to stay engaged with questions of broadband access.
The Institute for Information Policy at Penn State (IIP), celebrating its 20th anniversary, and the Journal of Information Policy (JIP), now in its 7th year, are organizing a one-day workshop to present and discuss research focusing on the challenges for achieving universal broadband access that takes into account technological developments, social and educational needs, and a dynamic political landscape. This workshop is the 15th in the IIP and JIP joint workshop series advancing an information policy agenda (for previous workshops see: http://comm.psu.edu/research/centers/iip/conferences-and-worskhops).

In June 2016, the IIP organized a two-day, interdisciplinary workshop at the National Science Foundation (NSF) and submitted its report titled Broadband 2021. Incorporating this, and other inputs, the NSF and the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) published the National Broadband Research Agenda (NBRA) Report in January 2017. These initiatives, though they emerged from the prior administration, are likely to have continued relevance especially now when the current administration has announced that infrastructure investments, including potentially in rural broadband networks, is a policy priority.

The workshop is a continuation of the NBRA process. Specifically, it is intended to further key objectives of the NBRA Report, namely to encourage policy and program impact evaluations and to foster increased collaboration throughout the research community. At the same time, it is geared to hear more voices and to encourage learning from academic, industry and policy players worldwide.

The workshop seeks to address broadband research at a meta-analytical level (“research about doing research”). Papers may address (but are not limited to) questions such as:

• The status of research on broadband: Identifying un-investigated and under-investigated questions;
• The quality of databases and structural impediments to the availability of data;
• The viability and validity of methodological approaches;
• Investigations of the policy processes behind broadband policy including the role of advocacy networks, foundations, and academic think tanks;
• The appropriateness of metrics and benchmarks for the temporal and cross-sectional evaluation of broadband access and performance;
• “Broadband Access”: To what? For whom?
• Should “broadband access” be a “human right”? An entitlement?
• Should there be a right for access to and use of mobile broadband services.  Will access to high-speed mobile broadband satisfy the requirement for “access”? 
• What is the role of the market in assuring universal broadband access, vs. the role of the government?
• What impact, if any, will new technologies such as the IoT, “Big Data” and the “cloud” have on broadband research?
• How can research on broadband support SMEs? Innovation? Entrepreneurship? R&D? Reducing the size of government and the need for government regulations?
• How, if at all, should tax policies be changed to encourage investments that will promote increased universal broadband access?
• International comparative studies of broadband access and policies for its development.

We refer you to the Broadband 2021 and the National Broadband Research Agenda (NBRA) Reports for other topics and research questions.

Presenters at the workshop will be invited to submit their completed papers for review by the Journal of Information Policy (www.jip-online.org).

Pending budgetary approval, some travel support may be available for junior scholars or those with significant travel expenses. We cannot guarantee that this support will be available at this stage.

In addition to the presentation of papers, an integral part of the workshop will be continuing and potentially institutionalizing the academic networking initiated at IIP’s June 2016 Broadband 2021 Workshop and strategizing mechanisms for the dissemination of academic research to government stakeholders.

Abstracts of up to 500 words and a short bio of the author(s) should be submitted to pennstateiip@psu.edu by July 15, 2017. Accepted presenters will be notified by July 31, 2017 on the acceptance of their paper and will need to commit to provide an advanced draft of their study by August 31, 2017, to allow selected respondents to read and prepare thoughtful comments in order to elicit a meaningful conversation. Please write IIP_BROADBAND2021: YOUR NAME in the subject line.

ARCHIVE-News-and-Events

Onboarding

Welcome to the Donald P.  Bellisario College of Communications!

To get you on board through the Penn State hiring processes and into the data systems, there are a number of forms we need you to fill out. Please contact Darlene Sidwell if you have any questions and please return all of the documents listed below as quickly as possible to:

Darlene Sidwell
224 Carnegie Building
University Park, PA 16802
dad2@psu.edu
814-865-3074

Form I-9 Employment Eligibility Verification

Please fill out section 1.

W-4 Employee's Withholding Allowance Certificate

Please fill out whole form.

Salary Deposit Request

Please fill out whole form.

Affirmative Action Applicant Datacard

Please fill out whole form.

Drug-Free Workplace

Read and sign.

Worker's Compensation Information

Please read pages 1-2.

Read and sign page 3.

Read page 4.

Read and sign page 5.

Read page 6.

Intellectual Property Agreement

Read and sign.

Biographical Data form for University Academic Records

Fill out section 1.

Do not fill out sections 2-4.

Sign and return with copy of CV.

Access Account for Faculty & Staff

Please fill out whole form.

 

 

After the HR paperwork process is complete:

After your paperwork has been processed, the final step will be getting your Penn State email address (a.k.a. your access account). We will tell you when you are ready to proceed with this step.

At that time, you will be contacted by the Penn State Access Accounts Office who will direct you to follow the following steps. The use of "we" or "I" in the instructions below represent your contact in the Access Accounts Office, not the Donald P. Bellisario College of Communications.

Step 1:
Please call the accounts office at 814-865-4772, if you have not already done so, to verify address and other information. Please note: If we do not have your current address on file, we will not be able to send your information until it is updated with Human Resources. If we do have the current address proceed below:

Step 2:                                                                                                                                                     

Per our conversation, please go to the following web site to fill out the PSU Access Account Acceptance Statement:

                                           http://ait.its.psu.edu/assets/aa_agreement.pdf

Step 3:
Please send the form back to our office along with a copy of your photo ID that has a legible signature on it (ex:drivers license or passport). You can fax the form to the Accounts Office at 814-865-9289. You can also scan and e-mail a copy to accounts@psu.edu.

***Also on the form, write the address that you want the password mailed to. This address must be the one that you are currently at and we must have it on file.

Step 4:
After I receive the information and it is legible, I will send your information to the home address we have on file via U.S. Mail.

IMPORTANT*** If you are faxing your photo ID please enlarge and/or enlighten it, so that it is legible. Include a phone number on the form of where I can contact you, if need be.***

Step 5:
After you receive your password in the mail go to www.work.psu.edu, click change your password. You can then just change your password to something you can better remember. You can also set up your security questions for the online password reset tool. If you find that in the future your password has expired or you forget what it is, you can then use the tool to reset the password online. You must have the security questions set up first.

 

Funded/Proposed Research Projects

Agricultural Sciences

Lee Ahern

  • Co-PI on $5 million grant through the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
  • The main goal of the project is to promote sustainable water management through the use of a proven, flexible, and transferable model of engagement of farmers and other stakeholders. The model, once tested and developed, will transform the way scientists, the Cooperative Extension System, agency officials and engagement specialists approach critical water issues. The $2.2 million is for the first year of a planned four-year, $5 million project.

Department of Agricultural Economics, Sociology and Education

Lee Ahern

  • Co-PI on national survey of ag scientists exploring attitudes toward intellectual property practices and public perceptions of science issues

Environmental Engineering

Colleen Connolly-Ahern

  • PI on survey/experiment exploring attitudes toward the use of biosolids in different stages of food production
  • Currently, more than 2 billion people on the planet suffer from lack of sanitation, leading to discharge of waste into water systems. Many of the same people also suffer from a lack of adequate proteins in their diet. From a sustainability perspective, turning human-generated protein into viable food would save energy and increase food security. But while the technology exists to turn wastewater into edible proteins through the growth cultivation of the duckweed, little is known about the social strictures associated with consuming water-derived proteins. Since this information is not known, the planned outcome of the study is a peer-reviewed research article. The study will also inform later planned work testing the impact of potential messaging on decisions to adopt wastewater based proteins.

Food Science

Denise Bortree

  • Co-PI on proposed study on rollout of new FDA food testing technology
  • The purpose of this project is to understand how the Food and Drug Administration (the FDA) is communicating about the rollout of new food testing technology called Whole Genome Sequencing (WGS), and specifically the new Genome TrackrTracker program, as well as how the food industry (including the food producers and distributors) are is managing and reacting to the same.

Entomology

Lee Ahern

  • Co-PI on study of communications practices of “natural” beekeepers
  • A complex and controversial beekeeping subculture has emerged—the “natural” beekeeper. Often urban and environmentally motivated, natural or organic beekeepers usually have a small number of hives, and engage in differing levels of science-based hive management. Commercial and more traditional beekeepers are critical of lax practices, and accuse natural beekeepers of spreading disease to their hives because of the lack of appropriate management.
  • This research project will explore the communication practices and information sources of different groups of beekeepers, and how they may impact management practices. We will also explore the sources of the dominant competing narratives on the primary causes, responsibility and solutions to colony collapse.


Current funded graduate student research projects

Marcellus Center for Outreach and Research (MCOR)
Jeff Conlin
• This research study considers communication messages, practices and other factors that may influence reputation of major university science research centers, including The Penn State Marcellus Center for Outreach and Research (MCOR). What is not as well investigated appears to be how major university research centers such as The Penn State Marcellus Center for Outreach and Research (MCOR) are not only managing the output of scientific research related to shale gas extraction, but also managing associated science communication and reputational behavior. Investigating this topic has the potential to add to scholarship and practically benefit current research center operations at Penn State and elsewhere.

Other funded graduate student projects

Sushma Kumble
• Persuasive characteristics of unstated argument assumptions and adaptation/mitigation framing in the context of global warming communication

Affiliate Penn State Programs

Building relationships and partnering with science-focused colleges, centers and institutes across the University has been the focus of the Science Communication Program since its inception.

Penn State is a world leader in multiple disciplines now at the center of urgent public communications and policy discussions -- energy, agricultural biotechnology, engineering, medicine and climatology, to name just a few. Access to leading researchers across these disciplines represents a rich opportunity for expanding and productive collaborations and partnerships.

Following are SCP affiliate Penn State resources that active in the areas of broader impacts and science translation, which by definition represent strong partners and support systems in communicating science:

The SCP actively cooperates with Penn State’s University-wide institutes in order to cross-pollinate ideas and support collaborative research efforts:

The SCP also partners with research groups and labs across the University that have science communications interests or components, including:

Faculty Positions

The Donald P. Bellisario College of Communications at Penn State is expanding its programs in science communication and seeks one or two assistant professors with proven experience and/or strong interest in building collaborative research teams focused on the science of science communication. (Candidates with exceptional experience and credentials will be considered at higher rank).

The Bellisario College is a national leader in undergraduate and graduate communication education, and in theory-driven research faculty productivity. A new $30 million gift naming the college from Donald P. Bellisario will support even more ambitious and cutting-edge student and faculty investment in the years ahead.

In addition to our Media Effects Research Lab, the Bellisario College provides faculty with graduate student support and numerous opportunities for internal and external funding. More broadly, Penn State is a world leader in multiple disciplines now at the center of urgent public communications and policy discussions -- energy, agricultural biotechnology, engineering, medicine and climatology, to name just a few.

Building and supporting collaborative research teams with strong social science components is a top priority for the University, and the Bellisario College of Communications is uniquely positioned to play a central role in these initiatives.

Preferred candidates will teach in the areas of advertising and public relations, journalism, or other areas of media production at the undergraduate level, and have strong ability or interest in exploring multi-disciplinary research opportunities across the University. Applicants should include a cover letter, CV, and three or more references who may be contacted for letters of recommendation (references will not be contacted without prior approval of the applicant).

For questions or additional information, please contact Dr. Lee Ahern, Director of the Science Communication Program, at laa182@psu.edu. Review of applications will begin on Sept. 31, 2017, and continue until filled.

Resources

The Science Communication Program provides seed funding and connects faculty and graduate student resources to facilitate collaborative research in the science of science communications. This support can be augment with additional resources from affiliated centers and institutes.

Research groups can also seek out grant application and budgeting support through the Donald P. Bellisario College of Communications and the Strategic Interdisciplinary Research Office.

For more information contact program director Lee Ahern (laa182@psu.edu).

Future Directions

A primary goal of the Science Communication Program is to move current seed-funded projects into National Science Foundation and other federal grant proposals. Administrative resources from within the College of Communications and the Strategic Interdisciplinary Office can be leveraged to strengthen federal and foundation grant proposals.

The program is also actively exploring and supporting new collaborations across the University and beyond:

  • Energy
  • Agricultural biotechnology
  • Climate science
  • Health

On a more practical and applied level, the program is developing support material and modules for training graduate students in faculty in the basics of science communication and media relations.

In addition, an undergraduate science communication course is being expanded to attract students from other disciplines and to reach a larger audience within and outside the University.

Resources can also be dedicated to public opinion surveys on attitudes toward specific science issues, and producing public reports and resources related to them.

Ideas from within and outside of Penn State for productive partnerships and projects are welcome. The future direction of the program will be determined by the interest and energy of our collaborative team.

About the Program

The Science Communication Program (SCP) in the Donald P. Bellisario College of Communications supports research and innovation that advance our understanding and implementation of effective communication related to science issues. The goals of the SCP reflect the aspiration that scientific advancements achieve broader positive social impacts, an aspiration that is manifesting itself across Penn State, academia, research organizations, government, and society.

For many issues, this begins with improved public understanding and acceptance of science. Communications research is uniquely positioned to provide insight as to how this can be achieved in different social contexts, for different issues, with different information sources, and different audiences with fundamentally different worldviews and values. It is within this complex environment of competing truth-claims, interpretations and (mis)understandings that public policy preferences emerge and individual behavioral decisions are made.

The science of science communication research agenda seeks to unpack and understand how all these individual and cultural dimensions interact, with the goal of describing and predicting how different approaches to communicating science issues will impact society.

A recent report from the National Academy of Sciences (National Academy of Sciences, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education, Committee on the Science of Science Communication, 2016, p. 8) summarizes the challenge this way:
Communicating about science effectively with public audiences, however, turns out to be more difficult than it might at first appear. People communicate about science for diverse reasons, there is no single audience for scientific information, and the societal contexts surrounding different scientific issues can vary considerably…Fortunately, a growing body of scientific evidence can help inform the most effective ways of communicating with the public under different circumstances, and an increasing number of organizations are working to help scientists acquire the necessary communication skills.

The agenda called for in the NAS report begins with research, and this research requires collaboration between bio-physical and social scientists. This is why supporting multi-disciplinary research and collaboration is a top priority for the SCP.

The SCP supports these collaborations with seed funding and administrative support. Resources can be used for participant recruitment/compensation, research and conference travel, invited speakers and panels, materials, and other research expenses.

Faculty Positions

The Donald P. Bellisario College of Communications at Penn State is expanding its programs in science communication and seeks one or two assistant professors with proven experience and/or strong interest in building collaborative research teams focused on the science of science communication. (Candidates with exceptional experience and credentials will be considered at higher rank).

The Bellisario College is a national leader in undergraduate and graduate communication education, and in theory-driven research faculty productivity. A new $30 million gift naming the college from Donald P. Bellisario will support even more ambitious and cutting-edge student and faculty investment in the years ahead.

In addition to our Media Effects Research Lab, the Bellisario College provides faculty with graduate student support and numerous opportunities for internal and external funding. More broadly, Penn State is a world leader in multiple disciplines now at the center of urgent public communications and policy discussions -- energy, agricultural biotechnology, engineering, medicine and climatology, to name just a few.

Building and supporting collaborative research teams with strong social science components is a top priority for the University, and the Bellisario College of Communications is uniquely positioned to play a central role in these initiatives.

Preferred candidates will teach in the areas of advertising and public relations, journalism, or other areas of media production at the undergraduate level, and have strong ability or interest in exploring multi-disciplinary research opportunities across the University. Applicants should include a cover letter, CV, and three or more references who may be contacted for letters of recommendation (references will not be contacted without prior approval of the applicant).

For questions or additional information, please contact Dr. Lee Ahern, Director of the Science Communication Program, at laa182@psu.edu. Review of applications will begin on Sept. 31, 2017, and continue until filled.

Funded/Proposed Research Projects

Agricultural Sciences

Lee Ahern

  • Co-PI on $5 million grant through the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
  • The main goal of the project is to promote sustainable water management through the use of a proven, flexible, and transferable model of engagement of farmers and other stakeholders. The model, once tested and developed, will transform the way scientists, the Cooperative Extension System, agency officials and engagement specialists approach critical water issues. The $2.2 million is for the first year of a planned four-year, $5 million project.

Department of Agricultural Economics, Sociology and Education

Lee Ahern

  • Co-PI on national survey of ag scientists exploring attitudes toward intellectual property practices and public perceptions of science issues

Environmental Engineering

Colleen Connolly-Ahern

  • PI on survey/experiment exploring attitudes toward the use of biosolids in different stages of food production
  • Currently, more than 2 billion people on the planet suffer from lack of sanitation, leading to discharge of waste into water systems. Many of the same people also suffer from a lack of adequate proteins in their diet. From a sustainability perspective, turning human-generated protein into viable food would save energy and increase food security. But while the technology exists to turn wastewater into edible proteins through the growth cultivation of the duckweed, little is known about the social strictures associated with consuming water-derived proteins. Since this information is not known, the planned outcome of the study is a peer-reviewed research article. The study will also inform later planned work testing the impact of potential messaging on decisions to adopt wastewater based proteins.

Food Science

Denise Bortree

  • Co-PI on proposed study on rollout of new FDA food testing technology
  • The purpose of this project is to understand how the Food and Drug Administration (the FDA) is communicating about the rollout of new food testing technology called Whole Genome Sequencing (WGS), and specifically the new Genome TrackrTracker program, as well as how the food industry (including the food producers and distributors) are is managing and reacting to the same.

Entomology

Lee Ahern

  • Co-PI on study of communications practices of “natural” beekeepers
  • A complex and controversial beekeeping subculture has emerged—the “natural” beekeeper. Often urban and environmentally motivated, natural or organic beekeepers usually have a small number of hives, and engage in differing levels of science-based hive management. Commercial and more traditional beekeepers are critical of lax practices, and accuse natural beekeepers of spreading disease to their hives because of the lack of appropriate management.
  • This research project will explore the communication practices and information sources of different groups of beekeepers, and how they may impact management practices. We will also explore the sources of the dominant competing narratives on the primary causes, responsibility and solutions to colony collapse.


Current funded graduate student research projects

Marcellus Center for Outreach and Research (MCOR)
Jeff Conlin
• This research study considers communication messages, practices and other factors that may influence reputation of major university science research centers, including The Penn State Marcellus Center for Outreach and Research (MCOR). What is not as well investigated appears to be how major university research centers such as The Penn State Marcellus Center for Outreach and Research (MCOR) are not only managing the output of scientific research related to shale gas extraction, but also managing associated science communication and reputational behavior. Investigating this topic has the potential to add to scholarship and practically benefit current research center operations at Penn State and elsewhere.

Other funded graduate student projects

Sushma Kumble
• Persuasive characteristics of unstated argument assumptions and adaptation/mitigation framing in the context of global warming communication

Affiliate Penn State Programs

Building relationships and partnering with science-focused colleges, centers and institutes across the University has been the focus of the Science Communication Program since its inception.

Penn State is a world leader in multiple disciplines now at the center of urgent public communications and policy discussions -- energy, agricultural biotechnology, engineering, medicine and climatology, to name just a few. Access to leading researchers across these disciplines represents a rich opportunity for expanding and productive collaborations and partnerships.

Following are SCP affiliate Penn State resources that active in the areas of broader impacts and science translation, which by definition represent strong partners and support systems in communicating science:

The SCP actively cooperates with Penn State’s University-wide institutes in order to cross-pollinate ideas and support collaborative research efforts:

The SCP also partners with research groups and labs across the University that have science communications interests or components, including:

Future Directions

A primary goal of the Science Communication Program is to move current seed-funded projects into National Science Foundation and other federal grant proposals. Administrative resources from within the College of Communications and the Strategic Interdisciplinary Office can be leveraged to strengthen federal and foundation grant proposals.

The program is also actively exploring and supporting new collaborations across the University and beyond:

  • Energy
  • Agricultural biotechnology
  • Climate science
  • Health

On a more practical and applied level, the program is developing support material and modules for training graduate students in faculty in the basics of science communication and media relations.

In addition, an undergraduate science communication course is being expanded to attract students from other disciplines and to reach a larger audience within and outside the University.

Resources can also be dedicated to public opinion surveys on attitudes toward specific science issues, and producing public reports and resources related to them.

Ideas from within and outside of Penn State for productive partnerships and projects are welcome. The future direction of the program will be determined by the interest and energy of our collaborative team.

Resources

The Science Communication Program provides seed funding and connects faculty and graduate student resources to facilitate collaborative research in the science of science communications. This support can be augment with additional resources from affiliated centers and institutes.

Research groups can also seek out grant application and budgeting support through the Donald P. Bellisario College of Communications and the Strategic Interdisciplinary Research Office.

For more information contact program director Lee Ahern (laa182@psu.edu).

About the Program

The Science Communication Program (SCP) in the Donald P. Bellisario College of Communications supports research and innovation that advance our understanding and implementation of effective communication related to science issues. The goals of the SCP reflect the aspiration that scientific advancements achieve broader positive social impacts, an aspiration that is manifesting itself across Penn State, academia, research organizations, government, and society.

For many issues, this begins with improved public understanding and acceptance of science. Communications research is uniquely positioned to provide insight as to how this can be achieved in different social contexts, for different issues, with different information sources, and different audiences with fundamentally different worldviews and values. It is within this complex environment of competing truth-claims, interpretations and (mis)understandings that public policy preferences emerge and individual behavioral decisions are made.

The science of science communication research agenda seeks to unpack and understand how all these individual and cultural dimensions interact, with the goal of describing and predicting how different approaches to communicating science issues will impact society.

A recent report from the National Academy of Sciences (National Academy of Sciences, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education, Committee on the Science of Science Communication, 2016, p. 8) summarizes the challenge this way:
Communicating about science effectively with public audiences, however, turns out to be more difficult than it might at first appear. People communicate about science for diverse reasons, there is no single audience for scientific information, and the societal contexts surrounding different scientific issues can vary considerably…Fortunately, a growing body of scientific evidence can help inform the most effective ways of communicating with the public under different circumstances, and an increasing number of organizations are working to help scientists acquire the necessary communication skills.

The agenda called for in the NAS report begins with research, and this research requires collaboration between bio-physical and social scientists. This is why supporting multi-disciplinary research and collaboration is a top priority for the SCP.

The SCP supports these collaborations with seed funding and administrative support. Resources can be used for participant recruitment/compensation, research and conference travel, invited speakers and panels, materials, and other research expenses.

Honor Roll

During the 2015-16 fiscal year, our alumni and friends provded $1,018,355 to support the College of Communications and its students. The Honor Roll recognizes alumni and friends who made gifts of $100 or more during the fiscal year. The information has been provided by the Office of University Development.

Dean's Circle

(Greater than $2,500)

A Bright Idea
Gerald W. Abrams
LaVonne Althouse
Altria Group Inc.
Douglas A. and Claudia Anderson
Arizona State University
Barbara R. Palmer Trust
Robert P. Barbarowicz
Anthony F. Barbieri Jr.
T. Robert Boulware
Bradley’s SC LLC
Martin and Maxine Brian
Todd J. and Anita A. Brightman
Benjamin A. Bronstein
Walter J. Broscious
Brownstein Group
Marc A. and Amy L. Brownstein
Joseph B. Butcher
Suzanne L. Butcher
Cafe 210 West Inc.
Joanne A. Calabria
Warren R. and Rebecca H. Carmichael
Olivier Cojot-Goldberg
Philip R. and Joan C. Currie
Stanley E. and Ann H. Degler
Donald W. Reynolds Foundation
Dow Chemical Company
Dow Jones Newspaper Fund Inc.
Joseph H. and Shirley W. Eberly
Helene W. Eckstein and William C. Humphries
Elizabeth A. Fetter and Donald Durbin
Fidelity Investments Charitable Fund
Florida State University Research Foundation Inc.
Ellen Miller Foster

Friends of Patrick S. Boland
Jay H. Grossman and Dorothy Daub-Grossman
Gregory W. and Deborah J. Guise
Marie Hardin and Jerry Kammer
Michael and Laurie Allen Harding
Daniel M. Hartman
Matthew J. Hayden
Thomas J. and Nancy R. Hayden
Bridget D. Hughes
Jeffrey W. and Nancy S. Hunt
Jay R. Jackson
Jewish Communal Fund
Jim Murray Memorial Foundation
John Templeton Foundation
Johnson & Johnson Contribution Foundation
Johnson & Johnson Services Inc.
David R. and Mary Lee Lauffer Jones
Richard L. and Sally Wayman Kalin
Stevens J. and Diane Kohn Kasselman
Wendy L. Lichtenstein
Alexandra Hughes Maloney and David Maloney
Frederick J. and Ann B. Martelli
Christopher J. and Diane Martin
Mary M. and Joseph W. Meder
Laurence E. and Carole Moskowitz
Murray Overhill Pharmacy Inc.
National Philanthropic Trust
Ellen Blakely Pagano and Louis A. Pagano
Barbara R. Palmer
Eric W. and Luisa M. Rabe
Lawrence D. and Deborah Raiman

Robert D. Richards

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
Andrew W. and Beatrice L. Schultz
Herbert J. and Jeanne S. Siegel
Bette B. Jackson Smith
Judith A. Stimson
Troan Foundation Inc.
United Way of Greater Rochester
U.S. Charitable Gift Trust
Thomas M. and Kirsten Verducci
Vranos Family Foundation
William Randolph Hearst Foundation
Linda Yaccarino-Madrazo and Claude P. Madrazo
David S. and Jamie Paul Yadgaroff
Randolph S. and Maria E. Yanoshak

Dean's Associates

($1,000 to $2,499)

John R. Affleck
Murali Balaji and Devi S. Ramkissoon
Randi D. Bandman
Richard M. and Antoinette R. Bange
John Q. Beauge
R. Thomas and Paulette Berner
Anne Brubaker Burns and John J. Burns
Jeanne Tremblay Chapkovich
and Kevin Chapkovich
Anne Simmons Chubb and
Kenneth A. Chubb
John C. and Valvria Blanding Clark
John M. and Maureen Collins
Robin A. Deacle
John and Janet Dillon
Foot Locker Inc.
Gene C. and JoAnn Foreman
Judith E. Friedman
Fuel Creative Inc.
Garner Anderson LLC
Donald W. Hamer and Marie Bednar
Brian M. and Dale Healy
Heasley&Partners Inc.

Kathy DeGrandi Heasley

Robert E. Heisse
Interstate Advertising Managers Association
Jennifer P. and Kenneth W. Irvin
Bill A. and Honey F. Jaffe
Gilbert Edward and Patricia L. Kindelan
Donald R. King
Eileen Wirtshafter Leibowitz
George C. and Nancy Akeley Lewis
Benson M. and Christine A. Lichtig
Amanda L. and Michael R. Lockwood
Loeb & Loeb LLP
Ann Marie Major
Robert P. and Marylou Miller Martin
Norman C. and Mollie Miller
Patrick Parsons and Susan Strohm
Richard J. and Stephanie Vuto Rapp
William E. Reimer
David W. and Marsha Silverberg Skidmore
Ralph E. and Kathleen Kirsch Smith
Stewart H. and Karen Stabley
Marylouise M. and Barry C. Uhlig
Richard M. Weissmann
Christopher C. Wheeler
James R. Wiggins and Christine V. Fleming

Communication Partners

($500 to $999)

Jane L. Agnelly
Ali M. Audi
Arvind Balaji
Kodumudi Balaji
Lakshmi Balaji
Judson E. Burch
Jane Lendvay Conley and David N. Conley
Carole L. Feldman
William J. Hackett
Anne M. Hoag
Jeanne & Thomas Hardy Family Foundation
Thomas G. Hardy and Jeanne Hardy-Sloan
Roy C. Justice

Lucille S. Leach
Left Right Repeat LLC
Mitchell E. Levine
Lisa Haney Lydon and Christopher Lydon
Ann M. Major and Erwin Atwood
Patrick J. and Helia Teller Maritato
David J. and Jodie L. Morris
Sanford I. Padwe
J. Ford and Mary S. Risley
Lorraine A. Ryan
Robin Ward Savage
Ralph D. and Nancy Wilson Schumack
Paul A. Seltman
Fuyuan and Robyn Shen
Jane-Perry Shoemaker
Virginia L. Sirocky
Paul L. and Mary Ann Tsompanas
Walt Disney Company Foundation
Lyle R. Yablonsky

Carnegie Club

($250 to $499)

Michael and Johanna L. Altland
Mark D. Ashenfelter
Kathryn L. Blum
Conrad H. and Candice J. Busch
Nathan A. Cecco
William P. and Lois J. Clark
Clifton W. Colmon
Pamela A. Cook
Christopher W. and Stephanie L. Crider
Cheryl A. Dunlap and James Levkoff
Kim D. Eaton and Anthony D. Etzi
Eliza Newell Flanagan
Robert L. and Kathleen M. Gavazzi
Catherine D. and Paul D. Greenland, III
Stephen A. Heiser
Chad W. Hershberger and Sarah Voorhees
Jeffrey B. and Elizabeth M. Hershey
Kate K. Hershey
Frederick A. and Marilyn Rinker Jennerjohn
Rebecca P. Jones
Richard W. and Ann M. Jones
Robert A. Junas
Jessica M. Kern
Jeffrey D. and Kimberly S. Klein
Stacy L. Landau
Rabbi Greg E. Litcofsky and Rachel I. Litcofsky
Thomas R. and Joanne Loebig
Richard W. and Susan
Pesansky Matthews
Abby Mayer
Deborah M. Meder and Larry S. Gohn
Kimberly E. Mehle
Michael B. and Esther Meyers
Brian A. Morrison
Norman J. and Betsy Murray
Stephanie L. Podey
Michael S. Poorman
Pamela A. Reasner and Mark Robert Cutkosky
Patrick C. and Renee Craig Reeder
William and Margaret A. Rehill
Caitlin R. and Nicholas Robert Rossmann
Benjamin S. and Karla Anne Rupp
T. Rowe Price – Charitable Giving
Trustees of Temple Emanuel-Rabbi’s Fund #2
Richard R. and Esther L. Van O’Linda
William H. and Mona
Signorino Wunderlich
S. Charles and Patrice Bradley Zdeb
Bu Zhong

Century Club

($100 to $249)

Eric and Patricia Alleger Adelmann
Marc J. and Stephanie L. Albero
David L. and Erin M. Alderfer
Gordon H. and Barbara Hamill Anderson
Mark E. and Bernedette R. Andersen
Dana Maser Bailey
Rishav Banerjee
Theresa K. Begly
Pierre A. and Mary L. Suhrie Bellicini
Michael J. Bello
Karen M. Bernardo
Jessica L. Blake
Lonny and Lea M. Bowers
Jane Wolbarst Braus
Tiffany K. Brennan
Christine J. Burke
Michael L. and Joyce R. Bussler
Melanie A. Caban
Amy A. Campbell
Robert W. Capo
John A. and Susan P. W. Caruso
Todd and Beth Brestensky Casteel
Stuart H. Chamberlain
Mary L. Cifuentes
Steven M. and Julie Schlanger Clemens
Melissa R. Cohen
John J. and Vicki Schneider Cousley
Victor J. and Toni Dewey Danilov
Kelly E. Davis
John H. and Alice Day
Lynn A. and Mark C. DeFabio
Judith Blackwell Detwiler and Jonathan Detwiler
Frank T. Di Palma
Lee W. Dieffenbacher
Jens K. and Colleen P. Duerr
John A. and Bernadette E. Dunn
Jennifer L. Evanitsky
Sarah M. and Michael Evers
Gary C. Ezard
Ronald and Lori G. Falcone
Earl D. Flick
Vito A. Forlenza
Jason Fornicola
Thomas D. and Barbara Priebe Fraticelli
Kim C. Friedman
Raymond and Shirley Gable Galant
Glenda Lou Gephart and Bill Phoenix
Michael and Marcy Mermel Gessel
Joseph R. and Eileen Gidez
Lauren E. Graham
Anthony M. Greco
Richard S. Greco
Robert K. and Joan Bickley Groff
Mark J. and Denise Hakowski
Traci Levy and Robert L. Hammond
Michael G. Hanusin and Jan Erica Gabrielson
Curtis R. and Inez Althouse Hare
Thomas A. and Joy A. Harvey
Sally A. Heffentreyer
Vance and Jenna L. Hefley
Heather A. Heigele
Carl H. and Phyllis Hamilton Heller
M. E. Hemming
Leonard F. Herzog
Steven and Karen Perillo Hockstein
David and Leslie Levin Hoffman
Edwin L. Hoffman
Anderson Isaacs
Matt and Amber M. Walker Jackson
Jewish Historical Society of Napa Valley
Mark B. and Eileen Roberts Jinks
Robert E. and Mary Bolich Joyce
Glenn N. and Lauren Kaup 
Brenda A. Kelly
Earle S. and Marsha Church King
Brian P. and Mona Kennedy Kirby
Joseph F. and Karen H. Klein
Jeffrey J. and Maryann Annadio Klick
Michael and Janet Klinefelter
Jack and Jeanne B. Klinge
Christin and Holly Knecht
Derek W. Koffel
Ronald R. Kolb
Paul A. Kovach
Peter A. Kowalski and Sandra A. Miller
Richard J. and Jocelyn A. Oring Kravitz
Gregory R. Kunes
Carl F. and Lisa Lahr
William J. Langan
Douglas C. and Carrie J. Le Bow
Rinaldo P. and Susan Leonardi
Robert F. and Brenda Marcia LeVine
Barry C. and Susan Silverberg Lewen
Katie K. Lewis
Christopher J. and Sabrina Landis Liller
Mark X. and Stacey Geib Lima
Alexander and Jennifer L. Lockridge
Alison E. Lohmann
Vincent A. and Heather Loss
Madalyn P. Mako
Denis J. and Catherine Zindler Malone
Joseph W. Maloney
Brittany C. Manopello
James C. and Donna M. Mansfield
Riva M. Marker and Erica Freed Marker
Ann Rittenhouse Martin and Scott Allan Martin
David W. and Jodie Hough Martinson
Mathis Pfohl Foundation
Thomas R. McAdams
Kirstyn M. Mccormick
Sean B. McDermott
Matthew J. McDonald
Michele M. McFarland
Lauren B. and James F. McHale
Joyce C. McKeever
Martin M. McNeeley and Susan Petix-McNeely
D. Jeanne Hapgood Mearkle
Richard A. and Lois D. Meyer
Arthur P. and Marjorie L. Miller
Grace M. Miller
Gary J. and Wendy P. Mondello
National Press Photographers Assoc. Inc.
Krystle M. Padilla
George G. and Sara Carson Peck
James C. and Patricia A. Peck
David M. and Elizabeth J. Pellnitz
Brenda A. Penderville
Jean Allen Petersen
Renee Petrina and Adam Maksl
Marlene D. Petter
Eric S. Plessinger and Alison Greenberg
Timothy W. Potts and C. Lu Conser
Michele L. Procino
Jacqueline M. Puzo
Brendan and Tracey Quinn
Maureen Quinn and Richard Ortiz
Betty J. Ramos
Patrick J. and Julia Ann Raring
Larry Reibstein and Jennifer Streicher Frey
Andrew H. and Alicia R. Richards
Debra J. and Brett A. Rodgers
Samuel V. and Mary F. Rogers
Robert M. Roselli
Jennifer E. Ryan
Joseph Salamon and Maureen Quinn Salamon
Steven W. and Susan D. Sampsell
Esther Latterman Schwartz
Kevin and Noreen Stock Schwartz
Jeffrey J. and Donna Getchen Schwoebel
David P. Sedore and Cynthia DeLeon
Erin M. Sheehan
Brian L. Shelly and Karen K. Jezierski
Jack L. Sholl
Mark and Carol Sigman
Tara L. Smith and Daniel Lee
Stephen D. and Deborah Solomon
Jeanann E. Sperrazza
Edwin R. Steel
Rodney B. and Patricia Stegall
Loretta L. Stempinski
Patricia J. Stewart
Thomas J. and Donna M. Stewart
Scott and Susan Founds Taylor
Linda E. Thomas
Jonathan and Debra J. Thurley
Eric L. Treece
Michael K. Trobich and Linda Crownover
Robert S. Wechsler
Matthew J. and April L. Wilbert
Jason M. and Selena
Gudknecht Wyant
Eric T. Yoder and Patti Black Yoder
Jey E. and Annette L. Yorks
Ralph E. and Lou Ann Zeigler
Wendy M. Zimmerman

Make a Gift

Gifts from alumni and friends to the Donald P. Bellisario College of Communications support the College and its students by making possible programming and scholarships. During the 2015-16 academic year, alumni and friends provided $1,018,355 -- a majority of which was directed to awards for communications students.

Emphasis areas for the College are:

GIVE NOW

Scholarships Provide Opportunities for Success

Senior Rachael David talked about her scholarship during the Donor and Scholarhip Recognition Dinner in September 2015. 

Give Now

Other Options

  • Designations: Gifts may be designated to benefit a center or institute within the College or to create or contribute to an existing scholarship fund or program. In addition, undesignated gifts provide important support that benefits the College and its students. If your company provides a match for giving, the University's tax ID number is: 24-6000376
  • Student Support Award: Designed to help students with extraordinary or unexpected needs, the Donald P. Bellisario College of Communications Student Support Award can help students who -- through no fault of their own -- face personal or financial curcumstances, such as a family member's job loss, illness or death that could prohibit them from completing their degree requirements at Penn State. This fund exists exclusively to help students with that type of one-time need.

For information about those options, please contact the Office of External Relations at 814-865-8801.

Questions About Gift Options

Kevin Musick
Director of Development
814-865-8801
krm2@psu.edu

Alumni Association Awards

The Penn State Alumni Association annually honors alumni, individually and in groups. Numerous Donald P. Bellisario College of Communications alumni have been recognized through the prestigious program.

Alumni Achievement Award

The Alumni Achievement Award recognizes approximately 10 graduates per year, 35 years of age or younger, who have shown extraordinary professional accomplishment. The award is open to all colleges within the University.

  • 2015: Mandy Murphy ('02) VIDEO
  • 2014: Amanda Gifford ('04) VIDEO
  • 2013: Dan Victor ('06) VIDEO
  • 2012: Ellyn Fisher ('99) VIDEO
  • 2011: Ryan Hockensmith ('01) VIDEO
  • 2010: Christopher D. Krewson ('98)
  • 2009: Riva Marker ('00)
  • 2008: Jessica Stuart ('96)
  • 2007: Michael Signora ('96)
  • 2006: Jarred L. Romesburg ('98)
  • 2005: Jill L. Cordes ('92)

Alumni Fellow Award

The Alumni Fellow Award is given to 18 to 25 Penn State graduates per year who have proven to be outstanding in their chosen field. All graduates of the University are eligible.

  • 2016: Mary Meder ('84) VIDEO
  • 2016: Tom Ortenberg ('82) VIDEO
  • 2015: Lisa Miles ('91) VIDEO
  • 2014: Marty Aronoff ('60) VIDEO
  • 2013: Mark Lima ('87) VIDEO
  • 2012: Thomas J. Hayden ('77) VIDEO
  • 2011: Linda Yaccarino-Madrazo ('85) VIDEO
  • 2010: T. Robert Boulware ('86) VIDEO
  • 2009: Marc A. Brownstein ('81) VIDEO
  •  2008: David H. Lipson Jr. ('78) VIDEO
  • 2008: Mary Beth Long ('85) VIDEO
  •  2007: Jimmy Cefalo ('78) VIDEO
  • 2007: Alisia Salters ('88) VIDEO
  • 2006: Frank P. Brennan Jr. ('69, '71g)
  •  2006: Mary Lee Schneider ('84)
  • 2005: Eric W. Rabe ('68)
  • 2004: Peter Warburton Shih ('67)
  • 2003: Jon M. Saraceno ('79)
  • 2002: Geraldine Warren-Merrick ('73)
  • 2001: Donald R. King ('69)
  • 2001: Richard A. Mallary ('64, '71g)
  • 2000: Donald R. Blair ('52)
  • 2000: Robert J. O'Leary ('71)
  • 1999: Jayne E. Jamison ('78)
  • 1998: Elizabeth A. Fetter ('80)
  • 1997: Marian U. Barash Coppersmith ('54)
  • 1997: Arnold S. Hoffman ('57)
  • 1997: Theodore A. Serrill ('32)
  • 1996: William A. Jaffe ('60)
  • 1996: Robert K. Zimmerman ('58)
  • 1995: Warren L. Maurer ('55)
  • 1994: Jane Perry Shoemaker ('70)
  • 1994: James R. Wiggins ('72)
  • 1993: Paul J. Levine ('69)
  • 1993: Jayne E. Miller ('76)
  • 1992: Lawrence G. Foster ('48)
  • 1992: Elliot S. Schreiber ('74g, '77g)
  • 1991: Carmen J. Finestra ('71)
  • 1990: Arthur M. Cooper ('59)
  • 1990: Rodney L. Nordland ('72)
  • 1990: Annette Capone Wright ('66)
  • 1989: Ronald S. Bonn ('52)
  • 1989: Marvin L. Krasnansky ('52)
  • 1989: Linda L. Salzberg ('56)
  • 1988: Brian M. Healy ('67)
  • 1987: David R. Jones ('54)
  • 1987: Norman C. Miller ('56)
  • 1982: Stanley B. Lathan ('67)
  • 1981: Samuel S. Vaughan ('51)
  • 1980: Charles J. Bierbauer ('66, '70g)
  • 1974: John Troan ('39)
  • 1973: Donald W. Davis ('42)

Distinguished Alumni Award

There is no limit to the number of Distinguished Alumni Awards granted annually by the University, but awards have averaged fewer than 10 per year to preserve the stature of the designation -- which is the highest-possible honor for a Penn State alumus.

  • 2016: Donald R. King ('69)
  • 2016: Mary Beth Long ('85) 
  • 2013: William Jaffe (’61)
  • 2009: Todd Blackledge (’83)
  • 2007: Rodney Nordland (’72)
  • 2005: Jayne Jamison (’78)
  • 2005: Alan Pottasch (’49)
  • 2003: Paul Levine (’69)
  • 2001: Donald Bellisario (’61)
  • 1998: Carmen Finestra (’71)
  • 1998: Marian Coppersmith Fredman (’53)
  • 1991: Charles Bierbauer (’67)
  • 1989: Sidney Friedman (’42)
  • 1986: Gerald W. Abrams (’61)
  • 1985: Richard Smyser (’44)
  • 1984: Stanley Lathan (’67)
  • 1979: Lawrence Foster (’48)
  • 1979: David Jones (’54)
  • 1978: Norman Miller (’56)
  • 1977: Samuel Vaughn (’51)
  • 1976: Adam Smyser (’41)
  • 1974: Herbert Nipson (’40)
  • 1972: Donald Davis (’42)
  • 1969: William Ulerich (’31)
  • 1968: John Troan (’39)

Honorary Alumni

  • 2008: Fran Fisher
  • 2002: Jane Zimmerman
  • 2001: Phillip Radcliffe
  • 1999: John Curley

Alumni Awards

Each year, the Donald P. Bellisario College of Communications and its Alumni Society Board honor alumni in a variety of categories.

The Outstanding Alumni Award

Presented to a graduate of the Bellisario College of Communications who has demonstrated excellence in the field of communications, contributed significantly to their profession and gained an exemplary reputation among colleagues and students within their community.

Past Winners

  • 2016: Nina Jack ('92 Film), television producer
  • 2015: Jayne Miller ('76 Journ), investigative journalist, WBAL-TV 
    VIDEO: Acceptance Speech
  • 2014: Joanne Calabria ('74 Journ), vice president of public affairs for CBS Television Group 
  • 2013: Kathleen Pavelko ('79g Journ), president/CEO WITF Public Media
  • 2012: Lara Spencer ('91 Journ), lifestyle anchor "Good Morning America"
  • 2011: Paula Froke ('82 Journ), assistant managing editor, The Associated Press
  • 2010: Joseph Krushinsky ('85 Telecom/Journ), vice president, Maryland Public Television
  • 2009: Tanya Biank ('93 Journ), author, "Army Wives," and journalist
  • 2008: Mark Livolsi ('84 Film), film editor, iTalent ("Wedding Crashers," "The Devil Wore Prada")
  • 2007: Jeff Baum ('85, Journ), vice president, Global Communications, EDS
  • 2006: Mary Meder ('83, Adv), president, Harmelin Media
  • 2005: David Lipson ('78 Adv), president, Metrocorp Holdings (Philadelphia Magazine)

The Achievement Award

Presented to a Bellisario College graduate or friend of the College whose significant contributions to the College and/or University, in terms of time and talent, have brought distinction to themselves, the College and University.

Past Winners

  • 2016: Lou Prato ('58 Journ), TV news director, Penn State sports historian
  • 2015: Mimi Coppersmith ('53 Journ), founder Town&Gown magazine, University donor and volunteer
    VIDEO: Acceptance Speech
  • 2014: Bill Jaffe ('60 Journ), University donor and volunteer
  • 2013: Chris Wheeler ('67 Brdcast), broadcaster, Philadelphia Phillies
  • 2012: Alex Ward ('66 Journ), The New York Times 
  • 2011: Ben Bronstein ('61 Journ), public relations, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center (retired)
  • 2010: Thomas Loebig ('80 Journ), director of digital media content and operations, AccuWeather
  • 2009: Robert McKinnon ('91 Adv), founder/president, Galewill social change agency
  • 2008: Chris Wightman ('84 Journ), managing director, communications, U.S. Golf Association
  • 2007: Marv Krasnansky ('72 Journ), retired VP of corporate communications at McKesson
  • 2006: Robert O'Leary ('71, Adv), former senior vice president of public relations for Sears Roebuck & Co.;
  • 2005: Kerrie Carfagno ('94 Brcab), college instructor

The Emerging Professional Award

Presented annually to recent alumni (10 years or less since graduation) for professional achievements and/or distinguished community service.

Past Winners

  • 2016: Tyler Walk ('06 Film), award-winning film editor
  • 2015: Arianna Davis ('09 Journ), staff editor, US Weekly
    VIDEO: Acceptance Speech
  • 2014: Blake Berson ('05 Journ), producer, CBS Sports
  • 2013: Michael Chobot ('09 Film-Video), sound mixer, DuArt Film
  • 2012: Sara Ganim ('08 Journ), reporter, CNN
  • 2011: Sheil Kapadia ('05 Journ), sports editor, Philly.com
  • 2010: Reenie Dyball ('02 Journ), writer, People.com
  • 2009: Evan Harris ('04 Telecom), marketing/promotions, CBS College Sports
  • 2008: Erin Hazard ('99 Adv/PR), senior vice president, consumer markets, Fleishman-Hillard
  • 2007: David Schaefer ('99 Adv/PR), manager of publicity for Discovery Channel
  • 2006: Brad Young ('96 Journ), associate publisher, marketing, Fortune Magazine
  • 2005: Ryan Hockensmith ('01 Journ), editor, ESPN The Magazine

Douglas A. Anderson Communications Contributor

A newly created award presented by the Alumni Society Board in 2012 to acknowledge the contributions and/or achievements of an individual(s) in the field of communications as they relate to the Bellisario College, Penn State and/or the Commonwealth. The recipient may not be a graduate of the Bellisario College (as there are other awards to recognize alumni achievement). The recipient could, however, still be a Penn State graduate.

Past Winners

  • 2016: Barbara Palmer, honorary alumnus, community leader and philanthropist
  • 2015: Jim Gardner, news anchor, WPVI-TV
    VIDEO: Acceptance Speech
  • 2014: Fran Fisher, the "voice of Penn State football," supporter, volunteer
  • 2013: Gene Foreman, visiting professor, journalism editor/executive, College of Communications
  • 2012: Doug Anderson, Dean of the College of Communications

Excellence in Teaching Award

The purpose of this award is to recognize those Bellisario College faculty who have demonstrated excellence in teaching, contributed significantly to the growth of students' learning, and gained an exemplary reputation among colleagues, students, and alumni. Nominees will be judged on their ability to inspire students and improve the classroom environment, their breadth and depth of knowledge of their subject, and their dedication outside the classroom. Nominations may be submitted by undergraduate students, graduate students, and student organizations. 

Past Winners

  • 2016: Kevin Hagopian
  • 2015: John Affleck
    VIDEO: Acceptance Speech
  • 2014: Michel Haigh
  • 2013: Steve Kraycik
  • 2012: Maria Baukus
  • 2011: Curt Chandler
  • 2010: Michael Elvasky
  • 2009: Ken Yednock
  • 2008: Ann Kuskowski
  • 2007: Richard Sherman
  • 2006: Martin Halstuk
  • 2005: Rod Bingaman

Click here to access nomination form

For all awards

Eligibility

Undergraduate, graduate, and doctorate degree alumni of the Bellisario College. Present Alumni Society Board members are ineligible.

Nominations

Departmental faculty, Alumni Society board members, or any alumnus or friend of the College may submit nominations for these awards.

Awards Nomination Form

Job Postings

Ad/PR Network

The Advertising/Public Relations Network is chartered by the College of Communications Alumni Society and focuses on the networking of alumni and professionals in the fields of advertising, public relations, community relations and marketing. The group serves as a resource for the College of Communications with the Department of Advertising/Public Relations having input and final approval of all activities and programs of the APG.

  • Provide support to the Department, College and University;
  • Implement and maintain a mentoring relationship;
  • Establish a regular program of seminars involving alumni guest speakers;
  • Work with PRSSA and the Ad Club to establish communications and beneficial programs;
  • Promote enhanced communication and provide a formal system for networking among alumni, businesses and students;
  • Provide and enhance student internship and career opportunities;
  • Establish opportunities for regular and ongoing student tours and visits at alumni businesses;
  • Encourage the contribution of funds for academic scholarships and activities for students in the Adv/PR Program;
  • Honor and award individuals for outstanding achievements through the APG.

Board Committees

  • Professional Liaison
  • Events
  • Nominating
  • Student Activities

Board Bylaws

Constitution and By-laws of the
College of Communications Alumni Society
The Pennsylvania State University

ARTICLE I
NAME

The name of this organization shall be the College of Communications Alumni Society of The Pennsylvania State University, hereinafter referred to as the Society. It is a constituent society of the Penn State Alumni Association.

ARTICLE II
PURPOSE

The purpose of this organization is to unite alumni in the College of Communications from the former School of Journalism (Liberal Arts), the Film/Video Program (Arts and Architecture), and Telecommunications Program (Liberal Arts) of The Pennsylvania State University, or alumni of the University who are currently professionally engaged in fields of communication and have declared the College's constituent alumni society as their preferred society, in order to promote the objectives of strengthening all professions in communications, providing a means whereby alumni may join together to enhance the interests and reputations of the College of Communications and University, and achieving closer fellowship among its alumni, faculty, and students.

The Society shall also assist faculty and staff to elevate and sustain the academic stature of the College; encourage support of development of academic programs and scholarships; promote professional development of students in all media through alumni counseling; and foster a sense of pride in and a commitment to the College while enhancing its reputation and prestige.

ARTICLE III
MEMBERSHIP

Section 1. Alumni Membership

All persons who are currently members of the Penn State Alumni Association and who have completed one semester or two terms of classes in the College of Communications and/or its predecessors (program areas) or, those who have declared this constituent alumni society as their preferred society, shall be eligible for all membership privileges of this Society.

Section 2. Associate Membership

Faculty members, present and past, parents of students or of alumni, and other friends of the College shall be admitted to associate membership in this Society upon payment of a fee to the Penn State Alumni Association for associate membership. Associate members may not vote or hold office in this society.

Section 3. Life Membership

Members of the College of Communications Alumni Society, who became life members of the Penn State Alumni Association, shall be life members of the Society.

ARTICLE IV
FINANCES

Section 1. Dues

Dues as set and paid to the Penn State Alumni Association shall provide a basis of eligibility for membership in the Society under a combined membership plan.

Section 2. Fiscal Year

The fiscal year of the Society shall be a period from July 1 through June 30.

Section 3. Operating Expenses

The basic operating expenses of the Society will be met with funds transferred to the College by the Penn State Alumni Association.

Section 4. Other Expenses

The other expenses of the Society (non-operating expenses) shall be met with funds solicited through fund raising efforts and the dean's general operating budget.

Section 5. Accounting

The funds of the Society are held within the accounting system of The Pennsylvania State University and administered by the director of alumni activities within the College with the advice and counsel of the board, and with final approval of the dean of the College. The alumni director shall render a statement of receipts and expenditures at each meeting of the board.

ARTICLE V
BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Section 1. Board of Directors

The board of directors shall be the governing body of the Society. It shall be the duty of the board to carry out the purpose, policies, and will of the Society, including the appointment of any representatives of and for the Society on any outside boards, councils, or committees to which the Society may have invitation and occasion to have representatives.

Section 2.1 Elected Members

The board shall consist of twenty-seven (27) members, including twenty-five (25) alumni members and two student representatives, both undergraduates enrolled full-time with third to sixth-semester standing. The students will be nominated by the Dean, members of his administration or College of Communications faculty.

Section 2.2 Immediate Past-President

This shall include the immediate past-president of the Society who shall serve as a member of the Executive Board for two (2) years.

Section 2.3 Presidential Appointments

All current program areas of the College shall be represented on the board by at least one member. To accomplish this goal, the president of the Society may appoint one or more director(s) to serve for one year with full privileges. The number of presidential appointments for the purpose of achieving board balance may not exceed six (6) in one year and must be approved by the executive committee.

Section 2.4 Ex-Officio Members

The following shall serve as ex-officio members of the board: the College's Dean, manager of alumni relations, and director of development; and presidents of The Daily Collegian Alumni Interest Group; Manchester Alumni Interest Group; Student Radio Alumni Interest Group; Advertising/Public Relations Alumni Network; and Lion Film & Video Guild.

Section 2.5 Term of Office

Beginning with new members of the Board seated after July 1, 2004, the terms of the members shall be for three years. No member shall be eligible to serve more than two consecutive terms, but after a period of one year of non-membership, a former member shall again be eligible. Any period of membership in excess of two years shall be considered a full term, and any lesser period shall be disregarded for the purpose of determining eligibility.

Section 2.6 Term Limitation

Beginning with members of the Board seated after July 1, 2004, a former member, after having been off of the Board for at least one year, may be elected again and eligible to serve two consecutive three-year terms. The term limit shall not be applied to the president, the president-elect or the secretary during their respective terms of office nor shall it be applicable to the immediate past president for the two years following his/her term as president. The Executive Committee shall have the discretion, subject to the approval of the Board, to adopt policies and procedures to implement the provisions of this Section in an orderly fashion. The Executive Committee, on the recommendation of the Nominating Committee and subject to approval of the Board, may waive the provisions of this Section for any member if it is deemed that such waiver would be in the best interests of the College of Communications and its Constituent Alumni Society.

Section 2.7 Retired Board Members

The Dean of the College may establish a means for retired Board members to continue their involvement with affairs of the College, e.g. The Carnegie Society.

Section 3. Voting Rights

Elected members, presidential appointments, and the immediate past-president shall serve with vote. Ex-officio members shall serve without vote.

Section 4. Absences

Two (2) consecutive absences from board meetings without notification may be deemed a resignation.

Section 5. Vacancies of Unexpired Terms

Vacancies of unexpired terms shall be filled as specified in Article V, Section 2.3.

ARTICLE VI
OFFICERS

Section 1. Officers

Officers shall serve for terms of two (2) years. Officers of the Society shall be president, president-elect, and secretary. All officers shall be elected from the active, eligible members of the board who have voting privileges.

Section 2. Election of Officers

The board of directors shall elect their officers at the spring meeting of the Society.

Section 3. Terms of Office

No officer may be elected to the same office for more than two (2) successive terms. Officers elected while serving their last year on the board will have their term extended to coincide with the term of office. Persons so extended shall be additional members of the board until their term as an officer expires.

Section 4. Office Vacancies

A vacancy occurring in the presidency shall be filled by the president-elect. Should any other office be vacant, an eligible member of the board who already has voting privileges shall be appointed by the president to serve until the office shall be filled by election.

Pursuant to Section 3 above, appointment to fill a vacant office shall not be considered as election to that office.

ARTICLE VII
DUTIES OF OFFICERS

Section 1. President

The president shall preside at all meetings and shall be responsible for general supervision of all work of the Society, including the appointment of such committees as may be deemed desirable. The president or member of the board appointed by the president shall serve as representative to the Alumni Council of the Penn State Alumni Association.

Section 2. The President-Elect

The president-elect shall perform such duties as may be designated by the president and the board. In the absence of the president, the president-elect shall preside at meetings.

Section 3.1 Secretary

The minutes of the Society, the executive committee, and the board shall be kept by the secretary. He or she shall send the minutes to the manager of alumni relations who shall have them duplicated and distributed to the members of the board in a timely manner.

ARTICLE VIII
COMMITTEES

Section 1. Standing Committees

There shall be (at least) three standing committees:

Executive Committee

The members of this committee shall be all officers, immediate past president, chairs of standing committees, and shall include the alumni liaison as an ex-officio member. The executive committee shall be empowered to create the agenda for board of director meetings, have emergency decision-making powers, and carry on the business of the board whenever necessary between regular or special meetings of the board; however, all decision of the executive committee regarding unbudgeted expenditures of funds in excess of $1,000 must have prior approval by a majority vote of the board of directors.

Nominating Committee

A nominating committee of three (3) shall be appointed by the President from any at-large members of the board who are not desirous of being considered as candidates for election. In addition to advancing their own recommended slate, the nominating committee shall solicit nominations from the general membership and put forth a slate advancing candidates proposed by it.

Candidates must be a member of the Alumni Association and a graduate of the College of Communications or its constituent predecessors or working in fields of communication and have declared the College's constituent alumni society as their preferred society. Individuals not specifically placed by nomination as the nominating committee's choice must submit 25 signatures pledging support of their name before being placed in nomination. All nominees will be requested to signify in writing to the nominating committee their willingness to serve and to present a biographical sketch. After review for eligibility, the alumni relations staff shall mail ballots, along with background information on each eligible candidate, to all members of the Society Board for a vote. Tabulation to be verified by a tellers committee composed of three (3) board members other than the nominating committee. Other procedures for conducting the elections shall be determined by the Executive Committee.

Program Committees

Program committees implement initiatives of the Board that support the Society's mission of service to alumni, students, faculty and staff, and the College, in general.

Section 2. Special Committees

The president or the board of directors shall create such special committees as necessary for the proper functioning of the Society. Any member of the Society may serve as a member of a special committee when appointed by the president with approval of the executive committee.

ARTICLE IX
MEETINGS

Section 1. Regular Meetings

The board of directors shall meet at least twice a year. The meetings shall be held on the date and at the place fixed by the board provided that one meeting shall be held during the fall semester and the second meeting shall be held during the spring semester.

Section 2. Special Meetings

Special meetings may be held at such time and place determined by majority of the board. Written announcement must be made at least four (4) weeks in advance of the date of the meeting.

Section 3. Quorum

Fourteen (14) voting board members present or participating via teleconferencing shall constitute a quorum.

Section 4. No Conflict

No provisions or actions may be taken by this Society which would be in conflict with the Constitution and By-Laws of the Penn State Alumni Association or the rules and regulations established by the Alumni Council.

ARTICLE X
AMENDMENTS

Section 1. Amendments

Amendments to this Constitution and By-Laws may originate with the board of directors or by written petition of twenty-five (25) or more members of the Society and must be submitted in writing to the president not less than two (2) months ahead for inclusion on the agenda of the next regular meeting of the board of directors.

Section 2. Special Notice

The alumni director shall send notice of intent to amend the Constitution and By-Laws along with complete information regarding the proposed amendments to each member of the board of directors and the Society at least four (4) weeks prior to the announced meeting.

Section 3. Notice Required

The Constitution and By-Laws may be amended at a regular or special meeting, providing that the special notice required by Section 2 above has been distributed to the board and to the Society.

Section 4. Voting on Amendments

Amendments to this Constitution and By-Laws may be passed by favorable vote of two-thirds of those members of the board of directors present and voting at the announced meeting, or participating via teleconferencing or by written proxy ballot submitted.

Revised 12/04

Board Committees

Awards & Recognition Committee

Ensure the ongoing recognition of outstanding achievements by faculty, alumni, students and friends of the College of Communications.

  • Solicit nominations and suggest candidates for specific awards.
  • Serve as the screening committee for specific awards.
  • Create other recognition programs as deemed appropriate.
  • Provide overall assistance in the awards process for specific recognition programs, including but not limited to: Annual Alumni Society Teaching Award, Alumni Society Student Leadership Award
  • College of Communications Society Annual Awards (Outstanding Alumni Award, College of Communications Achievement Award, and Emerging Professional Award)

Committee Members

  • Susan Rickens, chair
  • Abe Amoros
  • Warren Carmichael
  • Mike Signora

New Media Committee

Utilize new and emerging forms of media and media outlets to educate, inform and connect alumni, friends, faculty, administration and students of the College.

  • Communicate and publicize alumni programs by developing and carrying out communications plans for Alumni Society programs.
  • Help create, build membership in, maintain, utilize and maximize and social media sites.
  • Oversee the creation and use of alumni and Alumni Society Board pages and presence on the College of Communications’ Web site.

Committee Members

  • Cindy del Rosario Tapan, chair
  • Rob Boulware
  • Sharyn Fitzpatrick
  • Bob Heisse
  • Reenie Kuhlman
  • Rocco Impreveduto
  • Katie Krebs
  • Stacy Schwartz
  • Lara Steiner

Nominating Committee

Comprised of the executive committee: president, vice president, secretary and president emeritus.

  • Research, identify, recruit and interview potential nominees to the Alumni Society Board. Make recommendations. (Note: Final selection is made by a majority vote of the Alumni Society Board.)

Committee Members

  • Michele Marchetti, chair
  • Warren Carmichael
  • Jay Grossman
  • Carrie Snyder

Outreach Committee

Provide the vehicle by which alumni may be involved in the affairs of the College and of the University, to provide fellowship and, on occasion, assist in College fundraising and/or develop Board fundraisers.

Committee Members

  • Carrie Snyder, chair
  • Abe Amoros
  • Rob Boulware
  • Rocco Impreveduto
  • Scott Mayes
  • Joyce Tomana
  • David Yadgaroff
     

Professional Liaison Committee

Bring perspective from industry to the College – letting faculty and students know what is happening and changing in the industries.

  • “Build a bridge” with faculty, department heads and administration.
  • Channel information to the College Web site.
  • Bring industry professionals into the classroom.

Committee Members

  • Bob Heisse, chair
  • Michael Danese, Lion Film & Video Guild APG
  • Sharon Fitzpatrick
  • Katie Krebs
  • Reenie Kuhlman
  • Jill Leonard, Collegian APG
  • Scott Mayes
  • Meredith Topalanchik, Ad/PR APG
  • David Yadgaroff

Student Activities/Mentoring Committee

Help prepare students for obtaining internships and employment upon graduation. Encourage alumni interaction with students.

  • Sponsor periodic career seminars and mentoring programs for students at University Park and elsewhere, focusing on the skills and techniques required to obtain internships, scholarships and employment.

Committee Members

  • Rodnell Workman, chair
  • Jeanne Chapkovich
  • Wayne Hilinski
  • Susan Rickens
  • Mig Signora
  • Stacy Schwartz

Student Learning Assessment Committee

Work with the College administration to review, assess and report on the quality of student work, its progress and its application to the professional world. Completed as part of the College’s ongoing accreditation process.

Committee Members

  • Warren Carmichael, chair

Video Committee

A task-oriented ad hoc committee. Create a video to be posted on the College’s Web site, and shared with College alumni and friends, through many channels, such as Facebook. The committee’s initial video will tell the compelling story of students who have been impacted by scholarship support, be a vehicle to build awareness of the financial aid crisis and also attract donors.

Committee Members

  • Jeanne Chapkovich
  • Mark Lima
  • Michele Marchetti
  • Lara Steiner

Alumni Board

Alumni Society Board members, fall 2015

Mission

  1. To help elevate the stature of the College through objective review of its programs, and by dialog with the faculty, students, Dean and associate deans;
  2. To support the College through fund-raising and development efforts to the extent possible;
  3. To assist the Dean, faculty and staff in providing all media with the resources to prepare students for obtaining internships and employment upon graduation;
  4. To foster a sense of pride in and a commitment to the College while enhancing its reputation and prestige;
  5. To provide the vehicle by which alumni may be involved in the affairs of the College and of the University and to provide fellowship; and
  6. To insure the on-going recognition of outstanding achievements by faculty, alumni and friends of the College.

Equipment Room Rules & Procedures

Contact Information and Hours

Reservations
814-867-2516

OPEN:

9 – 5 Monday – Friday

CLOSED:

Weekends

ALL RETURNS ARE BY 3:00pm at the LATEST • Equipment is available to students currently enrolled in a production course AND who have completed the proper workshops for requested equipment. No training, No equipment.

General Inquiries

Mike Zelazny
Equipment Room Coordinator
213B Lubert Building
814-865-6414
maz166@psu.edu

Larger Map

Parking & Buses

There is ample parking behind Lubert building. During our office hours, the Red Link Bus runs from West Campus every 15-25 minutes (depending upon time of day) and stops directly in front of the building. See the CATABUS website for schedules.

Reservations

Reservation Requirements

Reservations will be taken up to two weeks in advance and require the following:

  1. A workshop corresponding to the equipment you want to take
  2. Completed “College of Communications Equipment Workshop Form”
  3. Student ID
  4. Time AND Date that the equipment is to be Picked Up AND Returned
  5. What equipment you want

Student ID Card Mandate

Reservations/checkout/check-ins mandate that you carry your student ID card. No ID card = no checkout. If you are working in groups, the person who makes the reservation with their ID card MUST be the one who picks it up AND returns it.

Course Enrollment Restrictions

Equipment is only available to students currently enrolled in production courses for the specific needs of that course.

Making a Reservation

  • Reservations will be taken in person, and over the phone. Phone inquiries concerning availability are also fine. No reservations left over the answering machine will be accepted.
  • Making a reservation is a detailed process and will take a while. You need to remain on the line until you receive your reservation confirmation number. If you hang up before we have completed the reservation process by giving you this number, your reservation will not be valid.
  • Students with extensive needs are STRONGLY ENCOURAGED to come in and do the reservations in person due to the amount of time required to reserve their gear over the phone.
  • Your reservation is GUARANTEED for ONE HOUR after your scheduled pick up time. If you have not picked up equipment or called by the end of this grace period, it will be given to anyone who asks for it, and you will assessed a “no call/ no show” fine. All equipment room fines must be paid before you can borrow or reserve any new equipment. CALL if you will be late.
  • Cancellations need to be made at least 1 hour prior to pick up time. You cannot cancel your reservation by leaving a message or via email; you will need to call/stop in and speak with someone personally.

Pick-ups & Returns

Equipment is Signed Out Overnight

If you pick up equipment on Friday, you have it for the weekend and it is due back Monday.

Every-other Day Fair Access

Groups and individual may have equipment every-other day. In other words, you can not check out equipment for two days in a row. You must leave at least one day between checkouts in order to allow others fair access.

Check your Equipment BEFORE Leaving!

It is to your advantage to confirm that everything works and is not damaged before you leave

Equipment Return Condition

Return equipment in the neat and orderly condition that you received it in.

Late Return Fines

Late returns will result in a fine. This is strictly enforced whether you are 15 minutes late or a day late.

Arrangements for Flexibility in Pick-ups, Returns, and Extensions

Early pick-ups, late returns, and extension can usually be arranged in advance. We try to be as flexible as possible in order to help you out. If you have a special situation, talk to your instructor and have THEM contact us concerning if we can accommodate you. DO NOT assume that you can pick-up early, return late, etc. without talking to us.

Warning About Equipment and Cars

DO NOT leave equipment in the car. NEVER leave cameras, mics and other sensitive electronics in your vehicle. If stolen, it is your responsibility for replacement costs.

Problems & Fines

Equipment Problems

If you experience a problem with the equipment, make note of it and tell us exactly what happened. Many times "problems" are user errors, so make sure you can show us what you did. This way, we can fix the problem or show you what to do next time

Financial Responsibility

You are financially responsible for the equipment. A typical camera checkout with all accessories can total between $3,000 to $5,000.

Fines

Unpaid fines will constitute a “HOLD” on your Penn State Student Account, rendering you unable to schedule courses or receive your DIPLOMA.

You must pay an outstanding fine immediately BEFORE you may check out equipment again.

WE ONLY ACCEPT LION CASH AT THE COUNTER

Equipment Room Fine Structure
Category Penalty
No show: failure to pickup your reservation $10
Late: day the equipment is due $25
Late: day after equipment was due $50 per day
Late: on a Friday return (meaning it was returned on Monday) $100

A Phone Call Can Save You Money

There may be some leniency by simply calling us PRIOR to due time and letting us know what’s going on, when to expect you, etc.. “I didn’t know your phone number” is NOT an excuse. Calling AFTER your due time will not necessarily save you from sanctions, but is still appreciated.

Don't Burn Bridges

Chances are that you will be here for the next two to three years and will be dealing with the Equipment Room on a regular basis. It’s all about you….showing up, calling when you have a problem, and treating all equipment with respect. Remember, we are here to help, so don’t be afraid to ask us questions and be honest with us.

Facilities & Technology

The Donald P. Bellisario College of Communications has 20 labs in six different buildings on campus. They include numerous facilities available for class work or activities outside of class. Descriptions of each follow, including contact information for using the respective labs.

101 Innovation Park

CommMedia

CommMedia is a 24/7 newsroom and multimedia production facility used by the best students in the College of Communications. It houses a state-of-the-art, high-definition television set for news and sports productions.

Professional-quality content produced by students is broadcast locally and distributed over an HD campus channel and featured on psucommedia.com, the College's student media website. Students can produce live shots from a number of on-campus locations, including Nittanyville and the Trading Room at the Business Building.

While in the field, student use high definition ENG-style or prosumer cameras. These cameras record on an SDHC flash media, making a truly tapeless workflow possible.

The CommMedia facility has 30 Mac Pro computers assigned to different media production roles -- including video editing and encoding, photo editing, audio recording and video playback and capture in the TV studio control room. The Mac Pro's are tied to an xSan, allowing students to access their media from any workstation in the facility.

Shows produced in CommMedia's HD TV studio use AP's industry standard ENPS software, which users connect to through virtual machine technology.

Steve Kraycik
814-865-2802
skraycik@psu.edu

Some of the broad range of video equipment available for student use.

Equipment Center

The Equipment Center (Suite 213B) houses audio and video equipment for use by students for class assignments.

Michael Zelazny
814-865-6414
maz166@psu.edu

Film-Video Shooting Space

The Film-Video Shooting Space (Suite 213E) is a large open room (22' X 28') with a lighting grid, blackout curtain and ample power and space to support the lights and specialized equipment used in the film program.

Michael Zelazny
814-865-6414
maz166@psu.edu

Production space with a green screen setup.

Finestra Digital Editing Lab

The Finestra Digital Editing Lab (Suite 213Q) is a state-of-the-art facility for video post-production is that serves the needs of telecommunications, broadcast journalism and film-video students. There are 20 Apple iMac's with Final Cut Studio editing software available. Students use portable firewire drives in this lab so they can easily move their projects and media to other editing stations and/other editing facilities or computer labs. The lab is generally open and staffed for 70 hours per week and a many as 98 hours a week toward the end of a semester.

Zachary Shourds
814-865-8006
zrs5003@psu.edu

Innovation Park Computer Lab

The Innovation Park Computer Lab (Suite 213A) consists of 20 iMACs. Software applications include Microsoft Office, Dreamweaver and Final Draft, a specialized screenwriting word processor. This lab is used primarily by film and broadcast journalism students. Access is controlled, and communications students have card-swipe access during certain hours outside of scheduled class time.

103 Innovation Park

Digital Audio Laboratory

The Digital Audio Laboratory (Suite 205) serves students in radio production courses, sports broadcasting and broadcast journalism courses. The lab consists of two rooms: an on-air broadcast studio with an AudioArts R-60 Console, RE-20 Mics, SDHC recorder, a digital audio workstation featuring Hindenburg Journalist Pro editing software and other broadcast industry standard equipment.

The lab features 10 DAW's with Hindenburg editing software and card readers. The card readers allow students to "drag and drop" their audio from SDHC cards into the editing software. Other related software includes Audacity, GarageBand, iTunes, QuickTime, Associated Press wire service, and Microsoft Office. Additional resources include a phone transfer station where students can call and record sources for news or sports packages to their SDHC card. Headphones and a music-and-sound effects library are also part of the library. All DAW's are tied to a central server allowing students to transfer, save and access their projects from either the audio or broadcast lab.

SCHC field recorders used in conjunction with this lab may be checked out from the equipment room.

Steve Reighard
814-863-6099
sjr9@psu.edu

Digital Broadcast News Laboratory

The Digital Broadcast News Laboratory (Suite 205) is designed for students in broadcast journalism. The lab consists of two rooms: an on-air broadcast studio with an AudioArts R-60 Console, RE-20 Mics, SDHC recorder, a Digital Audio Workstation featuring Hindenburg Journalist Pro editing software and other broadcast industry standard equipment. The lab features 10 DAW's with Hindenburg editing software and card readers. The card readers allow students to "drag and drop" their audio from SCHC cards into the editing software. Other related software includes Associated Press wire service and Microsoft Office. Additional resources include a phone transfer station where students can call and record sources for news packages to their SDHC card. All DAW's are tied to a central server allowing students to transfer, save and access their projects from either the audio or broadcast lab.

SCHC fiedd recorders used in conjunction with this lab may be checked out from the equipment room.

Steve Reighard
814-863-6099
sjr9@psu.edu

Television Studio

A television studio (Suite 205) is named for WJAC-TV. It is equipped with latest-in-the-industry HD digital technology in both the control room and studio. The studio lab provides students with the opportunity to gain both "on-air" and "behind-the-scenes" experience. This lab is set up for recording and broadcasting productions developed by faculty and students.

The lab can be run as a news station, using different sets to produce a standard network news production, including sports and weather segments. It is also used for specific topic presentations, both student and faculty produced, such as "Icers Hockey Report," "After Hours," "Centre Spotlight" and "Final Cut," to name a few.

Jim Dugan
814-863-6048
jrd138@psu.edu

Carnegie Building

Carnegie Cinema

Camera Equipment

Carnegie Cinema (113 Carnegie Building) is a general-purpose classroom used for for film series, for visiting filmmakers, for analysis of films in film classes that require a high level of control for sound and quality, and for production classes.

Tammy Falls
814-865-9393
tjf13@psu.edu

Carnegie Photo Lab

The Carnegie Photo Lab (6 Carnegie Building) consists of 16 Intel iMac computers, running a variety of software in support of the College's photojournalism courses. Applications include Adobe CreativeSuite, FinalCut Pro and a variety of audio-video utilities and conversion programs.

Access to this lab is controlled, and only students in the above-mentioned courses are permitted to use this facility.

814-865-9209

Pro Tools Studio

The Pro Tools Studio (16 Carnegie Building) building is equipped to help film and video students edit, mix and master their sound. The attached sound booth can be used for re-recording dialogue and recording clean sound effects and voiceovers.

Carnegie Mac Lab

The Carnegie Mac Lab (19 Carnegie Building) consists of 21 Intel iMac computers, running a variety of software in support of journalism, advertising and film classes. Applications include Adobe CreativeSuite, Microsoft Office, Quark Express and FinalDraft, a specialized screenwriting word processor.

Access to this lab is controlled. Communications students may have 24-hour access outside of scheduled class time.

Carnegie Film Lab

The Carnegie Film Lab (21 Carnegie Building) is an unstaffed, 24 hour-a-day, seven-day-a-week video editing resource for junior and senior film-video students. There are 11 editing stations available with Avid Media Composer and Adobe Creative Suite production software installed. Students use portable drives in this lab so they can easily move their projects and media to other editing stations and/or other editing facilities and computer labs.

Donald W. Davis Advertising Laboratory

The Donald W. Davis Advertising Laboratory (121 Carnegie Building) was designed for students majoring in advertising and public relations, and is used exclusively by those students and faculty members. This lab consists of 28 Microsoft Windows 7 Enterprise computers, running a variety of software in support of marketing, advertising, journalism and graduate classes.

John Curley News Writing Laboratory

The John Curley News Writing Laboratory (8 Carnegie Building) consists of 21 Microsoft Windows 7 Enterprise computers, running a variety of software in support of journalism and graduate classes. Software includes Microsoft Office 2010 and qualitative research software such as SPSS 18 and Amos 18.

James Building

Media Effects Lab I

The Media Effects Lab I (306 James Building) The Traditional Media Wing provides mainly graduate students and faculty the opportunity to do research involving radio, news, television, film and video game entertainment. Experiments may be conducted through the one-way mirror that separates the experimental room and observation room. The lab is also utilized by a few undergraduate students and graduate students from other departments, such as Communications Arts and Sciences.

Media Effects Lab II

The Media Effects Lab II (309 James) The New Media Wing has 22 computers and, like the Traditional Media Wing, also provides graduate students and faculty the opportunity to do research and to conduct experiments. For example, researchers can study implicit vs. explicit reactions in participants by testing their reaction time.

Willard Building

Gannett Foundation New Media Laboratory

The Gannett Foundation New Media Laboratory (317 Willard Building) provides a site for more sophisticated training and opportunities for the College's upper-division students. This lab consists of 21 Intel iMac computers, running a variety of software in support of journalism, layout and design. Applications include Adobe CreativeSuite, Microsoft Office and Quark Express.

This lab, used almost exclusively by the Department of Journalism, is designed to encourage collaborative learning. Access is limited to scheduled class time.

Shooting Space

Shooting space (316 Willard Building) is available for photography and film students. There is no official equipment.

Medlar Field at Lubrano Park

The John Curley Center for Sports Journalism has a dedicated classroom/seminar room in the University's baseball stadium. The room -- large enough for a skills class with about 15 students -- also serves as a host location for guests and special events at the ballpark. The space also allows students to study and write in an area separate from the press box.

Students who are in sports broadcasting or sports writing classes can participate a briefing in a classroom session and then go to their respective reporting positions.

The room includes several work stations, cable TV and other typical classroom amenities. In addition, the Medlar Field at Lubrano Park has a broadcast position specifically for CommRadio, the Web-based radio station housed in the College.

Kappa Tau Alpha

The Douglas A. Anderson KTA Chapter

Adviser
Michel Haigh

About KTA
Kappa Tau Alpha is a college honor society that recognizes academic excellence and promotes scholarship in journalism and mass communications. It is the seventh oldest of all college honor societies, founded 104 years ago.

It is the only national honor society in journalism/mass communications recognized by the Association of College Honor Societies.

Membership must be earned by excellence in academic work at one of the colleges and universities that have chapters. Selection for membership is a mark of highest distinction and honor.

The emblem of Kappa Tau Alpha is the key, the oldest symbol of knowledge and communications. The Greek leters mean "The Truth Will Prevail." The letters also suggest three English words: knowledge, truth and accuracy. The society's colors are light blue, significant of truth, and gold, emblematic of worth and high standards.


 

Society of Professional Journalists

Adviser
Steve Kraycik

About
For more than 100 years, the Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ) has been dedicated to promoting and supporting journalists. It offers unique resources to help students as well as working professionals.

The active chapter at Penn State -- which is open to ALL communications majors -- provides numerous opportunities, including:

  • Guest speakers who work in TV, radio, newspaper and other media fields.
  • Resources on media ethics, legal issues and other guidance, tips and advice.
  • Events and social activities with other Penn State SPJ members.
  • Connections to College of Communications students and SPJ members throughout our region and across the country.
  • Travel to annual regional and national SPJ conferences to learn and network.
  • Opportunities to enter students' best work in the SPJ Mark of Excellence Awards.
  • FREE local chapter membership. (SPJ  requires paid national membership, but students receive a substantial discount on the membership fee.)

For more info, visit SPJ's membership and home pages. Or, contact chapter adviser Steve Kraycik.

Membership
https://www.spj.org/joinapp.asp

SPJ Website
www.spj.org

Student Organizations

Research Opportunities

Undergraduate research opportunities in the College of Communications allow students to gain experience in their specified field of study while earning course credit. By working with faculty members in COMM 494, students will learn hands-on research skills such as coding, website/project management, website design, database searches, creative writing, analytical writing and more.

Opportunities are offered every semester and students may apply by contacting the faculty listed with the project that best fits their skills and needs. Faculty members are looking for exceptional students who have a desire to learn and grow in their communication field. Students who enroll in COMM 494 to assist faculty members with research are required to complete the university's Scholarship and Research Integrity requirements.

Undergraduate Research at Penn State

COMM 494 Application for Undergraduate Research Credits

Advertising/Public Relations Related Research Opportunities

Science of Science Communication: Boundaries and Dimensions

Details

One to two students needed to conduct a content analysis of academic research focused on science communication. There is growing interest among communication scholars in how people come to know what is known about science (global warming, nanotechnology, immunization/vaccination, etc.). In fact, enough work has been done in this area that we have an established new field: the science of science communication. This study seeks to bring some clarity to this new field in terms of what issues are being studied, and what about those issues is considered important. The goal is to provide context to guide future research efforts. 

Expected Tasks

Students will be trained to analyze research articles and code them for specific content. The articles will be from the journals Science Communication and Public Understanding of Science, dating back 10 years.

Necessary Skills

Good reading and organizational skills a must; understanding of research methods (COMM420 or equivalent) a strong plus.

Student Benefits

 Students will become adept at analyzing and interpreting social science research articles learn to conduct a content analysis, and learn a lot about current topics in science communication.

Timeline

Fall 2014 and Spring 2015

Contact 

Lee Ahern
814-865-8314
laa182@psu.edu

Sustainability Communication

Details

1-3 credits. The project will look at the way companies and nonprofits are communicating about the environment.

Expected Tasks

The student who works on this project should be familiar with sustainability/environmental topics and have a passion for environmental communication. Specific tasks will include coding and writing. Training will be provided.

Contact

Denise Bortree
814-865-1274
dsb177@psu.edu

Public Relations, Advertising and Health Promotion

Details

One or two students needed for an ongoing study of health promotion in the college setting. (1-3 credits)

Timeline

Ongoing

Expected Tasks

Assist with data collection, management, and analysis

Student Benefits

Students have the opportunity to develop a working knowledge of the role of research in developing messaging strategies.

Ann Major
814-865-3069
amm17@psu.edu

Film-Video and Media Studies Related Research Opportunities

Documentary Filmmaking

Details

Three to four student have an opportunity to work on one or more documentaries with award-winning filmmaker Boaz Dvir. His documentaries focus on ordinary people who become trailblazers under extraordinary circumstances. They include Jessie’s Dad, which captures Mark Lunsford’s transformation from an uneducated truck-driver to a savvy child-protection activist and was named Best Documentary at the 2011 ITN Film Festival in Los Angeles; Discovering Gloria, which paints the portrait of a highly innovative inner-city schoolteacher; and A Wing and a Prayer, which tells the virtually unknown story of World War II-veteran aviators who risked their lives and freedom to prevent a second Holocaust in 1948. 

Timeline

Ongoing

Expected Tasks

Tasks vary and are customized to each students’ skills and career goals. They include, but are not restricted to, research, writing, photography, videography, editing, graphics and promotion.

Necessary Skills

Strong filmmaking or journalistic skills.

Student Benefits

Improve filmmaking or journalistic skills, gain practical experience in documentary filmmaking, have an opportunity to earn a film credit.

Contact

Boaz Dvir
904-307-9075
bcd14@psu.edu

Documentary Filmmaking

Details

Get hands-on experience with award-winning documentary and narrative filmmaker, Pearl Gluck. Opportunities include experience in research and development, production, post-production, or marketing for fiction and non-fiction projects. Gluck’s work blends fiction with nonfiction addressing issues of identity, faith, and sexuality. Her films includes “Divan," an autobiographical documentary film which was developed at the Sundance Lab, “The Turn Out,” a film about a trucker who is drawn into the world of sex trafficking, and other films which have screened at festivals such at Cannes’ Cinefondacion, Starz Denver Film Festival, the Langston Hughes African American Film Festival, and the Wexner Art Center. Gluck teaches Screenwriting, Directing, and Producing.

Expected Tasks

Students will have the opportunity to explore areas of their own interests including storytelling, producing, directing, cinematography, editing, post-production audio or color correcting, social media outreach, and digital or print marketing. 1-3 credits are available.

Necessary Skills

Good communication skills, self-starter, and dependable. Depending on the tasks, previous experience with software and/or equipment.

Student Benefits

Students will meet with Gluck and discuss interests. Students will get hands-on experience in the areas of interest and could possibly earn a film credit.

Contact
Pearl Gluck
pxg28@psu.edu

Generation Gap in Social Media Use

Details

Working on the generation gap regarding social media use, including using mobile media devices such as iPad and smartphones. Specifically we like to see if there is a generation gap between the old and young regarding IT innovation, credibility of online information, online privacy and multitasking. You may also join our projects on how information flows may empower vegetable farmers and vendors. This project introduces the optimization of information flows in local vegetable supply chain as a strategic tool for agricultural development, especially vegetable production, in Chengdu, China. One or two students to join our team on this project.

Necessary Skills

Students must have an avid interest in information and communication technologies

Student Benefits

Opportunity to learn how social scientists work on research projects that have practical implications.

Contact

Bu Zhong
814-865-1023
bxz11@psu.edu

Journalism Related Research Opportunities

Currently no opportunities available.

 

Telecommunications Related Research Opportunities

Internet Marketing

Details

One student needed to research legal issues and controversies related to marketing on the Internet.

Timeline

Ongoing

Expected Tasks

Research current Internet marketing rules and regulations and recent cases and controversies related to Internet marketing.  Examples include rules regarding collecting information from children, spam, data collection and user privacy, use of trademarks, etc.

Necessary Skills

Interest in advertising and marketing regulation and/or interest in Internet law.  Prefer student who has completed COMM 320 and COMM 381 or COMM 403 or COMM 417 or COMM 492

Student Benefits

Improve research skills and develop knowledge of Internet law and marketing regulation.

Matt Jackson
814-863-6491
mattj@psu.edu

Ethics Research

Details

One student needed to research and write ethics assignements and case studies for classroom use.

Timeline

Ongoing

Expected Tasks

Research and write case studies based on ethical dilemmas and controversies within telecommunications.  Examples include  controversial content (sex, violence, stereotypes, political bias, invasion of privacy, etc.), technology (hacking software, eavesdropping equipment, sweatshop labor, copyright infringement, etc.), and business practices (sharing customer data, targeted marketing, intrusive tracking, deceptive billing, price fixing, etc.).

Necessary Skills

Good research and writing skills.  Must have completed COMM 100 or COMM 180.  Background and interest in ethics preferred.

Student Benefits

Improve your skills in research and writing, possible authorship credit, develop knowledge and understanding of media ethics and problems related to telecommunications

Matt Jackson
814-863-6491
mattj@psu.edu

General Research Opportunities

Scholarships

Thanks to the contributions of individuals and foundations, the Donald P. Bellisario College of Communications continues to award a record amount of scholarship support to communications students each year. Most scholarships are awarded by a scholarship committee in May to apply toward the following year's expenses.

Students at the University Park campus interested in applying for scholarships must complete the online application.

Students at non-University Park locations may check with the Office of Student Aid or officials at their respective campus about scholarship opportunities.

There are limited funds for incoming freshmen. Please contact Janet Klinefelter regarding availability and the application process for that support.

Forms to File

  1. The Donald P. Bellisario College of Communications Scholarship Application Form

    Required to be considered for any scholarship from the College.

    Deadline: Applications for the 2017-2018 academic year will be accepted between Jan. 2, 2017, and April 15, 2017 (before midnight).

  2. Free Application for Federal and State Aid (FAFSA)

    Required for scholarships that stipulate financial need. In order to establish and document your financial need, you must complete this form in accordance with instructions from the Office of Student Aid. This form is required for any scholarship awarded for "demonstrated financial need," and more than 95 percent of Donald P. Bellisario College of Communications scholarships require that proof. If you have questions about the FAFSA form, please contact the Office of Student Aid by phone at 814-865-6301.

    Deadline: This financial statement should be filed as soon as possible after Jan. 1 and no later than April 15.

PLEASE BE SURE TO SUBMIT EACH FORM TO THE APPROPRIATE OFFICE ON OR BEFORE THE INDICATED DEADLINES.

Eligibility

Recipient selection is based on the pre-set criteria established for each scholarship. While on scholarship, students must continue to meet the eligibility requirements:

  • Declare a major in the Donald P. Bellisario College of Communications at University Park
  • Complete a full-time course load (12 or more credits per semester with a requirement of 30 credits per year)
  • Maintain a respectful cumulative GPA
  • Attend scholarship recognition events as requested

Eligibility Questions

Janet Klinefelter
814-863-6135
jqk9@psu.edu

Disbursement

After the start of classes in Fall 2017, scholarship monies will be awarded to your student account in the Office of the University Bursar and disbursed as stipulated by the scholarship guidelines. However, monies will not be released from your Bursar account until we receive a thank-you letter to your scholarship donor, per the instructions in your notification email.

Renewals

Scholarships are not automatically renewable and a new scholarship application should be filed each year.

Notification

Scholarship awarding is an ongoing process; however, the majority of the awarding is completed in June before the upcoming academic year. You will be notified by an email to your Penn State address.

ONLY RECIPIENTS ARE NOTIFIED.

If you do not receive a scholarship in the first round, your application will be kept on file for the academic year and will be reconsidered if additional funds become available.

 

Questions
Janet Klinefelter
814-863-6135
jqk9@psu.edu

Other Scholarship Sources

Scholarships

A pair of students on graduation day. Thanks to the contributions of individuals and foundations, the College of Communications consistently awards some $600,000 in scholarship support to students each academic year.

The College has developed a sizable scholarship program specifically for diversity students as well. The major funding source is through a grant from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. Some $40,000 is awarded each year though that program to top-flight students of color.

Most College of Communications scholarship are awarded by a faculty committee during the spring semester of each academic year to apply toward the following year’s expenses. The assistant dean for multicultural affairs serves on this committee.

Scholarship Resources

Student Organizations

Get Involved!

Interested students may join any of the student groups described below by contacting Joseph Selden, assistant dean for multicultural affairs.

Additional information and upcoming events may be found on the Multicultural Affairs Facebook page.

Asian/Hispanic/African/Native American Student Organization

AHANA was created to celebrate the many cultural heritages within the College of Communications. Through heritage programs and other activities, we explore other cultures and backgrounds. We also bring in industry professionals to share their experiences within the communications field. Membership is open to everyone.

Penn State Association of Journalists for Diversity (PSAJD)

The Penn State Association of Journalists for Diversity strives to unite students of all cultures in the field of journalism. PSAJD members publish the quarterly newsletter, “Cultural Expressions,” which showcases the talent and expresses the views of multicultural journalism students. PSAJD is also an important partner for many diverse programs through the Office of Multicultural Affairs that celebrate diversity, including African-American Heritage Month, Asian/Pacific Islander Heritage Month and Hispanic Heritage Month. PSAJD strives to create unity between different cultures and showcase the talents of students across campus.

Diversity Ambassadors

Diversity Ambassadors is an organization of talented students who have dedicated their time and effort to assisting new students with their development and adjustment to the College of Communications and Penn State. The diversity student peer-mentoring program provides every new student of color with a ambassador to assist with their academic pursuits, personal growth and leadership development during their first year of college. Diversity ambassadors act as referral agents, student mentors, campus tour guides and assist the assistant dean of multicultural affairs with his diversity recruitment initiatives throughout the year.

Diversity Scholars

Diversity Scholars is a group of highly motivated academic achievers who meet monthly to enhance their academic, personal, professional and leadership skills by interacting with exceptional faculty, staff, alums and distinguished visitors from the communications industry. The group includes Dean’s List Scholars, scholarship recipients and students in good academic standing. “This is a highly talented group of scholars who come together each month to develop and improve their skills to understanding our highly technological and global society,” Assistant Dean for Multicultural Affairs Joseph Selden said. “They are truly our future leaders for the 21st Century and beyond.”

Diversity Initiatives

Diversity Goals

The Office of Multicultural Affairs both leads and supports the College of Communications in meeting and exceeding diversity fostering goals Penn State.

  • Developing a Shared and Inclusive Understanding of Diversity
  • Creating a Welcoming Campus Climate
  • Recruiting and Retaining a Diverse Student Body
  • Recruiting and Retaining a Diverse Work Force
  • Developing a Curriculum that Fosters U.S. and International Cultural/Competencies
  • Diversifying University Leadership and Management
  • Coordinating Organizational Change to Support our Diversity Goals

Courses with a Diversity Component

A student working on coursework sits behind a computer monitor. For more than a decade, the College of Communications' strategic plan has called for "developing a curriculum that fosters intellectual and international competences by offering courses in each major that incorporate diversity modules where relevant."

As a result, faculty members in the College go to great means to ensure a curriculum that helps to prepare students to live and work in a multicultural society. There has emerged a genuine desire on the part of faculty to incorporate, whenever appropriate, diversity issues into their courses.

As a testament to this fact: Since our first Framework to Foster Diversity report in 2001, instructors have incorporated diversity components into 61 additional course sections, bringing the total number of sections that incorporate diversity issues to 117.

List of Courses with a Diversity Component

Diversity-related Research

Faculty Members' Diversity-Related Research

Academic Support and Services

The Donald P. Bellisario College of Communications’ Office of Multicultural Affairs provides:

  • Extensive academic, personal and financial counseling.
  • Career and internship counseling and assistance. The Office of Multicultural Affairs works in tandem with the Office of Internships and Career Placement to assist students in fully optimizing their career potential.
  • A full array of student organizations, including:
    • Asian/Hispanic/African/Native American Student Organization (AHANA)
    • National Association for Minorities in Communications (NAMIC)
    • Penn State Association of Journalists for Diversity (PSAJD), which publishes Cultural Expressions (our student-run multicultural newsletter)
    • Diversity Ambassadors
    • Diversity Scholars
  • Trips to student job fairs.
  • A wide variety of cultural awareness heritage programs and receptions.
  • The Summer Research Opportunity Program (SROP), which brings talented multicultural undergraduate students to campus who are then matched with research mentors from our faculty.
  • Access for students from underrepresented groups for Bellisario College of Communications, University-wide and national grant and scholarship awards.
  • Leadership to the College in terms of the recruitment and retention of a diverse student body. Each year, the Office of Multicultural Affairs organizes a group of diverse undergraduate and graduate students to conduct phone-a-thons to recruit diverse students and to assist high school students with their admissions applications.
  • input on the recruitment and retention of multicultural faculty and staff.

International Opportunities

Through “embedded” courses or numerous study abroad programs at Penn State, students may gain exposure to different situations that help them open their minds, and possibly change their lives. Such experiences prepare students for the global professional environment of the 21st century.

Embedded Programs

Embedded courses allow students to complement a semester of classroom work with a focused week of study and hands-on work in a foreign country.

COMM 402 International Reporting

This program is designed to give student journalists experience in reporting the news in a foreign country. This course includes an international travel component and had visited Brazil, China, Mexico and South Africa.

Sixteen Penn State students in South Africa for an International Reporting course.

COMM 419 World Media Systems

This course that emphasizes a comparative study of modern media systems of mass communications in selected foreign countries. This course includes an international travel component to Prague, Czech Republic.

The beautiful city of Prague, location of COMM 419 World Media Systems travel component.

COMM 497 International Documentary Production

This program includes an international travel component to England. Students research and produce a short documentary film to be shot during the trip abroad.

International documentary class on location

 

Study Abroad

Penn State Global Programs Website

A traditional study abroad program will open your mind and change your life. It will also prepare you for the global professional environment of the 21st century.

Follow the information under "resources" to begin your exploration of Penn State's 160 study-abroad programs around the world.

Resources

  1. Office of Global Programs

    Lists all programs, options and available financial aid.

  2. Peer Advisers

    Students who have studied abroad will consult on a walk-in basis in 410 Boucke Building.

  3. Education Abroad Advisers (EAAs)

    After talking to a peer adviser, make an appointment with an EAA to discuss: choice of program, the application process and financial aid. EAAs are also located in 410 Boucke Building.

  4. College of Communications Academic Advising
    College advisers in 204 Carnegie Building and the faculty adviser in your major will help make study abroad courses fit your course of study.

You need to know

A traditional study abroad program will open your mind and change your life. It will also prepare you for the global professional environment of the 21st century.

Planning and preparation represent a big part of the process when considering study-abroad opportunities.

  1. Your degree requirements.
    So, please go over audit with an academic adviser.
  2. How your credits abroad will count.
    Studying through a Penn State international program or through a non-Penn State international program differ in terms of accreditation and transfer of credits.
  3. Your financial aid situation.
    If you wish to receive financial aid or have received financial aid in the past, discuss your study-abroad plans with the financial aid office to understand how studying abroad works with your financial aid qualifications and obligations. Go to the Financial Aid Office, 314 Shields Building, or call 814-865-6301.
  4. Your internship possibilities and obligations.
    If there is a possibility of an internship abroad, it is extremely important for you to understand all the internship obligations before going abroad. You must meet with Robert Martin, assistant dean for internships and career placement, 208D Carnegie Building (814) 863-4674.

Communications and Democracy Semester

Washington, D.C., is not only the center of the American government, but it is also a cultural hub, a major media market, and home to trade associations, public policy institutes, law firms, embassies, politicians, and pundits. The Communications and Democracy Semester in Washington, D.C., is an academic program designed to enable students to both complete course work and intern in the nationís capital while earning Penn State credits in their degree programs.

The program is specifically designed for communications and political science majors, yet other students (particulary those in The College of Liberal Arts) will benefit from the participation in the program. Students will have the opportunity to hear from members of the media and government about how Washington works while gaining valuable on the job experience and building an admirable resume.

Coursework

The course schedule for the Washington Program will vary each fall semester and is subject to change based upon the needs of the students and availibility of faculty. During a typical fall semester, the following courses are offered:

  • COMM 403 Law of Mass Communications
  • COMM 407A Media and Government
  • COMM 407B Perspective on American Journalism
  • COMM 495 Internship
  • Plus 400-level political science offerings tht change from year to year

Housing

Instrata apartments, D.C.Students in the Stanley E. Degler Washington Program stay at Oakwood Crystal City. Located in heart of Crystal City, Virginia, the convenient high-rise is just minutes to downtown Washington, D.C., the Pentagon, and Reagan National Airport.

Prior to student arrival, Washington Program staff assign groups of four students of the same gender to fully furnished, two-bedroom apartments within the host property.

Building amenities include a 24-hour front desk concierge, air conditioning, a private washer and dryer, cable television, wireless Internet access, and a kitchen stocked with all necessary dishes, utensils and baking pans. Linens, including comforters, sheets, pillows and towels, are provided by the building staff and are changed regularly. A bi-weekly cleaning service is included in the cost of rent, and student apartment rentals come with two complimentary parking spots. Oakwood Crystal City is just is a short walk from the Crystal City station on the blue/yellow line of the DC Metro rail system -- the subway system used by all program students to commute to their internship locations.

The Washington Program staff renegotiates a discounted group rate with the host provider on an annual basis. We inform students of each session's housing charges prior to that session's official student commitment deadline. Housing charges are posted to each student's Bursar account about two weeks after students have moved to the Washington area."

Internship Samples

Washington Program FAQs

Frequently Asked Questions

  • Penn State students at capitolWhat are the dates of the Penn State Washington Program sessions?
    Spring
    : The second Saturday in January through the second Saturday in May
    Summer: The first Saturday in June through the first Saturday in August
    Fall: The last Saturday in August (the second-to-last Saturday in August if the last Saturday falls on Labor Day weekend) through the first Saturday in December
  • Are all Penn State students eligible to participate in the Penn State Washington Program?
    The Penn State Washington Program staff considers students of all majors in its selection process. However, the program is limited to juniors and seniors because most Washington organizations do not accept internship applications from freshmen and sophomores. Students must be juniors or seniors during the semester that they plan to spend in Washington (or rising juniors and seniors for the summer sessions). 
  • Can students submit an application if they are graduating before their targeted Washington Program session?
    No. The Penn State Washington Program only accepts applicants who will be current Penn State students at the time of their targeted Penn State Washington Program session.
  • Does the Penn State Washington Program guarantee students an internship?
    Utilizing a Washington-area professional network that the program staff has been building since 1995, the Penn State Washington Program guarantees selected students an internship role related to their professional field of interest. The scope of a student’s targeted professional field is determined during the application and interview processes. The Penn State Washington Program does not guarantee students internship roles at specific organizations because hiring decisions are made internally within each organization.
  • How does the internship placement process work?
    The internship placement process can work in one of three ways:
    1. Students can rely on the internship coordinator to seek out their internship (the choice of most students).
    2. Students can collaborate with the internship coordinator on the internship search.
    3. Students can conduct their internship searches independently without the aid of the coordinator. 

    After students sign contracts committing them to participate in the Washington Program for a particular semester, the program’s internship coordinator tailors the internship search to a student’s particular interests in the months prior to their arrival.

    The coordinator typically applies on a student’s behalf to about 4 or 5 organizations at a given time, adjusting the application strategy based on a student’s qualifications as well as the conditions of the Washington internship market. Some students are hired very early in the process, while others may not receive word about a job until shortly before arrival in Washington.

    Since 1995, every single Washington Program student has gotten an internship.
  • What is the typical work schedule for Washington Program interns?
    Internship organizations have complete control over determining internship work schedules, but summer session students typically work Monday through Friday. Semester students typically work Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday, with Thursdays off to take academic courses in the fall. 
  • When does the Washington Program offer academic courses?
    The Penn State Washington Program offers academic courses only during fall semesters.
  • What types of courses are available to Washington Program students?
    The Washington Program offers 400-level Communications and Political Science courses to students. These courses have no prerequisites.  Courses are held in classroom space in Washington, D.C., every Thursday.  All courses are taught by Penn State instructors. Students may also supplement their academic courses with online courses. The program coordinator is available to proctor exams for those courses.
  • Are fall semester students required to take any number of academic courses?
    No.
  • What are the costs associated with the Washington Program?
    While the Washington Program does not charge a program fee, students are responsible for covering the cost of their academic credits, housing, course textbooks (fall semester only), and personal costs such as food and commuting costs.
  • Are students required to receive academic credit for their internships?
    No, but some organizations may require students to take at least one internship credit in order to comply with labor laws if no other form of compensation is made available.
  • Are students required to use the Washington-area housing provided by the program?
    No. Students with close friends or relatives near the Washington area often opt to live with them as a cost-saving measure. Students who choose to find their own housing cannot be included in the Washington Program housing at a later date after shopping around.
  • How much does Washington Program housing cost?
    Housing costs are renegotiated each year in order to secure the most competitive possible rate for the Washington temporary housing market.  The cost of each furnished, two-bedroom apartment is split between four student residents.  Students will be informed of their particular session’s total housing costs before formally committing to the Washington Program.
  • How are students billed for the Washington Program’s associated costs?
    Penn State will bill students’ bursar accounts for Washington Program housing charges approximately two weeks after the program’s move-in date.  The housing costs will be charged in a lump sum, not a monthly rent payment.
  • Do Washington Program students pay in-state or out-of-state tuition?
    All Washington Program students pay the same tuition rates that they would pay at University Park. In-state students pay in-state tuition rates, and out-of-state students pay out-of-state rates.
  • Are internships paid?
    Most internships in the Washington area are unpaid and the internship coordinator does not use compensation as a criterion in student internship searches.  Some students may receive small stipends for their work, but students should not expect them.
  • Are students able to work part time outside of their internships to earn extra money?
    Yes. Past Washington Program students have secured part-time work outside of their internship roles to generate income.
  • Are all applicants accepted to participate in the Penn State Washington Program?
    No.
  • How are candidates evaluated and selected?
    The Washington Program staff takes a “big picture” approach when evaluating applicants. We assess academic performance, past work experience, ability to function in a professional environment, writing skills, and involvement in campus activities. We also determine whether or not the Washington area provides sufficient internship opportunities in a student’s field of interest. Like any city, Washington provides richer opportunities in some industries than others.
  • How many students are accepted for each session?
    Rather than target a specific number of students, the Penn State Washington Program seeks to accept as many students as we can whom we feel can take greatest advantage of the opportunity.
  • I'm interested in the Penn State Washington Program, but I want to keep my options open.  Is it possible to apply for internships in other cities after committing to the Washington Program?
    No, but thanks to our large professional network and internship placement guarantee, shopping around won't be necessary. If selected to participate in the Penn State Washington Program, you will be asked to sign an acceptance memorandum that formally commits you to our spring, summer or fall semester session.

    Because of the trust that we have built up among organizations in the Washington area, each internship application that our staff submits represents our endorsement of your skills, professionalism and maturity. Our endorsement of a student who withdraws from the program at a later date has the potential to erode that trust and damage our longstanding professional relationships. Therefore we cannot conduct an internship search on your behalf without a signed acceptance memorandum demonstrating your full commitment to the Washington Program.
  • Where should I submit my completed application?
    Please submit all completed applications to the drop box located in 201 Carnegie Building. 
  • Who is Stanley E. Degler?
    The program's benefactor and namesake, Stanley E. Degler, earned his bachelor's degree in journalism from Penn State in 1951 and made his mark in the nation's capitol during a career that spanned more than five decades and set a standard for generations of successors to emulate. He started a one-man news bureau serving newspapers in Pennsylvania and later spend 33 years with the Bureau of National Affairs (BNA). The news bureau for provided news for select audiences, and Degler covered the Department of Defense, environmental issues, transportation agencies, the space program and a variety of other issues. He rose to executive editor, in charge of all BNA publications in the 1980s and later became senior vice president. He endowed the Stanley E. Degler Washington Program with a $1 million gift to Penn State in 2016.
     

Washington Program

The White House

Washington, D.C., is a city that offers a wide variety of academic, professional and cultural opportunities for undergraduates. From Capitol Hill to CNN and the Smithsonian, students have the chance to gain valuable on-the-job experience and work with professionals in their fields. The Stanley E. Degler Washington Program gives students the opportunity to tap into all the resources the city has to offer.

Internships

Established in 1995, the Washington Program was started to give students a complete Washington experience, including internship placement and credit, housing, and special events and programs. It was formally renamed the Stanley E. Degler Washington Progam in 2016, when the alumnus -- who built a respected career in the nation's captial -- provided a $1 million endowment to support the program.

Students from all areas of the University have participated in the Washington Program. Over the years, they have worked for organizations like the American Civil Liberties Union, CNN, the Environmental Protection Agency, the office of Sen. Arlen Specter and the Organization of American States.

Academics

Communications and Democracy Semester

In 1998, the program expanded to include its first academic component. The Communications and Democracy Semester, structured specifically for students in the fields of communications and political science, offers Penn State coursework on-site for the Washington interns. Students may take up to 18 credits of classes taught in Washington by Penn State instructors as well as local professionals.

Eligibility

The Stanley E. Degler Washington Program is open to juniors and seniors in any major. Sophomores are considered on a case-by-case basis. Interested students participate in a thorough selection process. Students are selected based on interest, academic standing, writing samples, references, and an interview. If selected, students are placed in internships according to their majors, interests, experience, and career goals.

Throughout the year, information sessions are held to discuss the opportunities available through the Washington Program.

Follow Us for Additional Information

Contact

Academic Semester Programs, Internships

Prof. Robert Richards
814-863-1900
rdr2@psu.edu

Katie Sullivan
814-602-7986
kms5424@psu.edu

Hollywood Program, Snapshots

Hollywood sign viewStudents in the inaugural Hollywood Program have enjoyed many special opportunities -- from meeting alumni and friends in the Los Angeles to conducting group sessions with high-profile entertainers and partcipating in hands-on internships. Here's a look:

Hollywood Program FAQs

  • What are the dates of the Penn State Hollywood program?
    The program coincides with the spring academic semester at Penn State, running from January through May.
  • What kinds of internships will be available?
    The entertainment industry provides a vast array of opportunities that would meet the interests of students in any College of Communications major. Students might intern in production or post-production. Many, if not most, of the television shows you enjoy are produced, at least in part, in the Los Angeles area. Of course, Hollywood is the film capital of the world. And that's just the tip of the iceberg. Students majoring in public relations or journalism might find work in the entertainment publicitiy field working for a network, a particular show, a studio or an independent firm. Los Angeles is the second-largest TV market in the country, so student looking to work in television (including news) will find opportuniites at several networks or network owned-and-operated TV stadions. For those looking to get into the "business" behind the entertainment business, such as entertainment law, programming, talent agencies (just to name a few) myriad opportunities exist. Advertising majors looking for opportunities in the creative side of the field will find that Los Angeles is the site of much television commercial production -- and ad agencies and creative services divisions of television sstations creat a great deal of those spot. Again, this is just a glimpse of the opportunities available, and when music, online and video game opportunities are added to the mix, the possibilities are limitless.  
  • Does the Penn State Hollywood Program guarantee students an internship?
    Utilizing an enthusiastic network of alumni and internship partners in the Los Angeles area who appreciate the reputation of Penn State and the College of Communications, the program has abundant interest from potential internship sites. As a result, the Penn State Hollywood Program guarantees selected students an internship role related to their professional field of interest. The scope of a student’s targeted professional field is determined during the application and interview processes. The Penn State Hollywood Program does not guarantee students internship roles at specific organizations because hiring decisions are made internally within each organization.
  • Are students required to receive academic credit for internships?
    No, but some organizations may require students to take at least one internship credit in order to comply with labor laws if no other form of compensation is made available.
  • Are internships paid?
    Many internships in the entertainment industry and related fields are unpaid and the internship coordinator does not use compensation as a criterion in student internship searches. Some students may receive small stipends for their work, but students should not expect them.
  • Are students able to work part time outside of their internships to earn extra money?
    Yes. If it does not conflict with their internship commitment, Penn State Hollywood Program students may secure part-time work to generate income.
  • Where will students live?
    Housing for the Penn State Hollywood Program will be at Oakwood Toluca Hills, 3600 Barham Boulevard, Los Angeles.
  • Are students required to use the housing provided by the program?
    No. Students with close friends or relatives near Los Angeles can opt to live with them as a cost-saving measure. Students who choose to find their own housing cannot be included in the Hollywood Program housing at a later date after shopping around.
  • Will I need a car while living in Los Angeles?
    Los Angeles is a sprawling metropolitan area, and its reputation for having the worst traffic in the country is well-deserved. That said, having a car is a definite plus. Most people you talk to in Los Angeles will say it's an absolute necessity. (Of course, that's why the traffic is a nightmare!) Additionally, Los Angeles is lacking in the area of public transportation. While bus service is extensive and will get you to most places, often with transfers to other lines, rail service is limited. Buses obviously share the road with all other traffic so getting somewhere on time requires careful planning. That said, in researching what other university programs do, we found that while most students do not bring a vehicle to Los Angeles or procure one while they are there (you may be able to rent a vehicle for the semester), about a third of students rely on public transportation. Some carpool with students who have vehicles. In terms of full disclosure: Transportation is not easy -- but it's not impossible either, and the benefits of testing the waters of the entertainment industry in Hollywood through a low-risk, structured University program that provides an internship, housing and academic course opportunities far outweighs the inconvenience.
  • What does it cost to participate?
    Students will pay their regular Penn State tuition (in-state/out-of-state) as if they were at University Park. We negotiate the housing contract once we have our enrollment figures determined. Penn State does not add any additional program fees. The remaining costs (transportation, food, entertainment, etc.) are, in large part, up to students. Those costs will vary with each individual student. Obviously, the total semester costs will be greater than what you pay at University Park, but you should think about it as an investment in your future. If you have ever dreamed of working in the entertainment business in some capacity, this may be your only opportunity to determine if that lifestyle is really for you. Many people, including hundreds of Penn State alumni, have thrived in Hollywood and have discovered lives beyond their wildest imagination. Others have not enjoyed it and moved away as soon as they could. The greatest advantage of a program like the Penn State Hollywood Program is that it provides you a chance to see what the business ire really like -- from the trenches -- and not as glamorized in fiction. It is a difficult business, but it also is one that opens up tremendous opportunities for people who are willing to work hard at it.

Housing

Oakwood Beverly HillsHousing for the Penn State Hollywood Program will be at Oakwood Toluca Hills, 3600 Barham Boulevard, Los Angeles.

Four students will share a two-bedroom unit that is completely furnished. The facility is used by many people who are planning a short stay in the Los Angeles area, such as actors who have relocated here for “pilot season” or to be part of a short-term production.

Several other universities that run Los Angeles programs also use these apartments. The facility is located near the Universal Studios and Warner Bros. lots.

Of course, students participating in the Penn State Hollywood Program are free to find their own housing or live with friends or relatives instead.

Hollywood Program

Hollywood signOpportunities abound in Hollywood, and the Penn State Hollywood Program exists to help students get valuable experience in the entertainment industry in the city that serves as the creative hub for movie and television production as well as news, public relations and much more.

Offered for the first time in 2016, the program coincides with the spring semester at Penn State. That period from January to May offers an abundance of opportunity in the Los Angeles area.

First, television production is in full swing: dramas, game shows, late-night talk shows and sitcoms are in production at that time. When the shows are in production, the allied fields (entertainment news, programming, publicity, etc.) are in full operation as well.

Second, the spring is “pilot season” in Hollywood. That is the time when networks order pilot episodes of shows that may go on the fall schedule. While some cable networks launch shows at various times during the year, there remains an abundance of new production in the first four months of the year.

Finally, the spring semester starts with "awards season" in Hollywood. The Golden Globes, the Screen Actors' Guild Awards, the Directors’ Guild Awards and, of course, the Oscars all take place during this time period.

About the Program

The Penn State Hollywood Program is an initiative available to juniors and seniors enrolled in the College of Communications in any major. Students selected to participate in the program will have the opportunity to live in Los Angeles and complete an internship in one of several facets of the entertainment industry.

Penn State courses on entertainment industry topics will be offered on site. Additionally, students may enroll in online courses offered through Penn State’s University Park campus or through the World Campus.  Consequently, it is possible to maintain a full course load while living in Los Angeles.

Commencement

Commencement Address, Spring 2017


Future Commencement Dates

  • Summer 2017 (Saturday, Aug. 12)
  • Fall 2017 (Saturday, Dec. 16)
  • Spring 2018 (Saturday, May 5)

For Students and Families

Instructions: Instructions for baccalaureate degree candidates are included in information packets mailed to students who have declared their intent to graduate.

Graduates with Disabilities: Penn State encourages persons with disabilities to participate in its programs and activities. It is important that graduates notify the College of Communications (814-865-1503) if they anticipate needing any type of special accommodations.

FAQs

  • Where do students purchase caps, gowns, announcements and related commencement items?
    The Penn State Bookstore
  • What if a student forgets to purchase a cap and gown?
    The Bookstore is open all weekend during commencement for last-minute caps and gowns.
  • Do those who attend need tickets?
    No, tickets are not required for the ceremony.
  • Is there a rececption after the ceremony?
    Yes, information will be provided for students and their families to RSVP in late April.
  • How do students confirm they have met all the requirements for graduation?
    Students may run a degree audit or visit the advising office in 204 Carnegie Building to schedule an appoinment or make a drop-in visit, which are available weekday mornings.
  • What time do students need to be at the Bryce Jordan Center?
    Graudates are asked to be at the BJC an hour before the ceremony and to REMEMBER TO BRING YOUR NAME CARDS
  • When do students get their diplomas?
    They will be mailed, at no cost, to all graduates who have satisfied all University, College and major requirements approximately four weeks after the cermony.

General commencement information may be found at http://commencement.psu.edu/

Academic Plans, Suggested Schedules

Academic plans, major checksheets and course schedules for each of the majors in the College of Communications.

Advertising/Public Relations

 Advertising Recommended Academic Plan

Public Relations Recommended Academic Plan

Checksheet

Film-Video

Recommended Academic Plan

Checksheet

Journalism

Broadcast Journalism Recommended Academic Plan

Digital and Print Journalism Recommended Academic Plan

Photojournalism Recommended Academic Plan

Checksheet

Media Studies

Film/TV Studies Recommended Academic Plan

International Communications Recommended Academic Plan

International Study Abroad Semester Recommended Academic Plan

Media Effects Recommended Academic Plan

Society and Culture Recommended Academic Plan

Checksheet (all options)

Telecommunications

Recommended Academic Plan (for students at Penn State before 2015)

Checksheet (for students at Penn State before 2015)

Recommended Academic Plan (for students at Penn State since summer 2015)

Checksheet (for students at Penn State since summer 2015)

 

FAQ

Need Answers Quickly?

Browse our FAQs

Students can find the answers to all of the questions listed below, and many others, by utilizing the various information resources provided by this College of Communications Web site, as well as via the eLion System. It is strongly recommended that students consult with a College of Communications academic adviser when using these sources of academic information in their educational planning.

What is the Natural Science requirement for students in the College of Communications?

All students in the College must complete 9 credits of Natural Sciences (GN) as part of their General Education requirements. Any 9 credits of courses designated as GN qualify. Students ARE NOT REQUIRED to complete a laboratory course, although they can choose to do so.

What is the foreign language requirement and course placement policy for students in the College of Communications?

All students at Penn State who are pursuing a Bachelor Arts degree, including College of Communications students, are required to reach the "12th credit level of proficiency" in one foreign language in order to graduate. Students reach the "12th credit level of proficiency" by completing a level 003 foreign language course at Penn State ( SPAN 003, FR 003, GER 003, etc.).

Students' placement in foreign language courses is based on the number of high school Carnegie Units (years) completed in the same foreign language. For example, students who completed 0-1 years of a foreign language in high school are expected to begin study in that foreign language at the 001 level at Penn State, and would eventually need to also complete levels 002 and 003 of that same foreign language to reach the "12th credit level of proficiency" for graduation.

Likewise, students who completed 2-3 years of the same foreign language in high school are expected to begin study of that foreign language at the 002 level at Penn State, and would need only to complete the 003 level of that same foreign language to reach the "12th credit level of proficiency" for graduation.

Finally, students who had 4 or more years of the same foreign language in high school would be expected to begin study of that foreign language at level 003 at Penn State, which by itself would satisfy the "12th credit level of proficiency" for graduation.

Are there any courses that students in the College of Communications can "double-count" for major and General Education and/or Bachelor of Arts requirements?

PSYCH 100, ECON 102, and STAT 200 are requirements for the Advertising/Public Relations major that are permitted to "double-count" in this way. With careful planning, students can use PSYCH 100 and ECON 102 to satisfy 6 credits of Social and Behavioral Sciences (6 credits in General Education); and STAT 200 can be used to satisfy 4 credits of Quantification (GQ) in General Education. In telecommunications, ECON 102 can satisfy 3 credits of Social and Behavioral Sciences in general education or bachelor of arts areas. "Double counting" does not mean 6 credits are received for one 3-credit course. It means two requirements are satisfied by one 3-credit course.

Can College of Communications students take extra COMM courses outside their majors to satisfy elective requirements?

In all College of Communications majors, students must carefully utilize their elective credits because 80 credits of non-COMM courses (65 of those 80 credits must come from courses in the Liberal Arts and Sciences) are required to graduate. This requirement is mandated by the Accrediting Council on Education in Mass Communications (ACEJMC), and is one of the measures used by the ACEJMC to evaluate the College for national accreditation purposes. Students should meet with their Academic Advisor on a regular basis to determine their progress toward the" 80 credit rule" to see if they have room in the electives area to take a few extra credits of COMM courses.

What is the "Other Cultures" requirement? How is it different from the "Cultural Diversity" (also known as the "Intercultural and International Competency") requirement? Can students in the College of Communications use the same course to satisfy the Other Cultures and Cultural Diversity?

The Other Cultures requirement is a 3-credit requirement in the Bachelor of Arts area. It is designed to help students learn about cultures that are non-Western (non-European) in origin. In addition to the Other Cultures Bachelor of Arts requirement, students also must fulfill General Education's United States Cultures (US) and International Cultures (IL) requirements. Students ARE NOT PERMITTED to use the same course to satisfy multiple Other Cultures, US, or IL requirements .

What is the Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) requirement?

The WAC requirement is a graduation requirement for all Penn State students. Its intent is to ensure that students complete a 3 credit writing intensive course selected from "W" courses offered by their major or college. All College of Communications majors offer "W" courses.

When should I start planning for an Education Abroad experience?

Generally speaking, students should begin planning an Education Abroad program at least one year prior to the semester in which they plan to study abroad. Students can visit the Office of Global Programs (410 Boucke Building) to begin exploring programs that match their interests. Most programs have prerequisites and require a recommendation from the student's advisor. Students should schedule an appointment with an advisor to discuss their Education Abroad plans as soon as they become interested.

When and how can students declare a major in the College of Communications?

All College of Communications and Division of Undergraduate Studies (DUS) students can apply for the College of Communications major of their choice during their second year (fourth semester) via the Sophomore Entrance to Major application process. At that time, students declare their 1st, 2nd, and 3rd major preferences. After a review of their qualifications to enter their preferred majors, students are notified by the Registrar's Office in mid-March or early April if they qualified for any of their three choices.

Are College of Communications students required to choose a minor in addition to their majors?

The Journalism major and the Media Studies ( International Communications option) majors are the only majors in which students MUST choose a University approved minor. Students in any other College of Communications major can pursue a minor if they choose to do so.

Can College of Communications students minor in an area of Communications?

College of Communications students can minor in any of more than 100 University-approved minors. However, College of Communications students CANNOT complete a minor within their own college.

Can College of Communications students "double-major" within the College (i. e., major in Journalism and Telecommunications)?

College of Communications students CANNOT "double-major" within the College. If they wish to do a concurrent or Multiple Major program, the second major must be chosen from outside the College.

What is an internship, when should College of Communications students do an internship, and how much credit can they receive for it?

It is important for students to gain practical experience related to their program of study (which is often times referred to as an "internship") whenever the opportunity presents itself (as early as the summer between their first and second years, or as late as their last semester of enrollment). Internships can be done as paid or unpaid experiences, depending on the rules of the site offering the internship. With the approval of the College's internship coordinator, internships can also be done for credit. The College of Communications limits the total number of credits earned for internship experiences to 3 credits.

In addition to internships and major courses, what other ways can College of Communications students get a better understanding of their majors and future careers?

Students in the College of Communications can join various student clubs and organizations (the Advertising Club, The Public Relations Student Society of America, etc.) to get a better sense of what their majors and future career fields are about. Volunteering at local organizations during the school year, or at organizations near home during the summer, also give students opportunities to gain insight into and practical experience within their area of interest.

In addition, the Office of External Relations sponsors a number of programs for students each semester that allow them to make connections with College alumni.

Advising

The Donald P. Bellisario College of Communications recognizes the importance of advising and supports students as they plan and achieve their academic and career goals. To help with that, a dedicated, eight-person staff exists for scheduled appointments and drop-in hours.

The ultimate responsibility for understanding University and Bellisario College policies and for completing all degree requirements rests with the student, but the advising office can assist you with information and advice on:

  • Building Skills for Academic Success
  • Career Goals
  • Choosing a Major
  • Course Selection and Scheduling
  • Education Abroad and Washington Program
  • Internships
  • Independent Learning
  • Requirements & Certification for Graduation

Hours

Drop-Ins 

8:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Monday through Friday
Students are encouraged to arrive early. Hours may vary depending on volume and waiting times.

Appointments

12:30 p.m. to 4 p.m., Monday through Friday during fall and spring semester
*-Summer appointments available by calling 814-865-1503
Make an appointment with this link.

Deadlines

Student Registration: Aug. 20

Regular Drop: Aug. 26 at 11:59 p.m.

Regular Add: Aug. 27 at 11:59 p.m.

Late Drop Begins: Aug. 27

Late Registration Begins: Aug. 28

Late Drop Ends: Nov. 10 at 11:59 p.m.

Withdrawal: Dec. 8 at 5 p.m.

Applications

For honors and special courses.

COMM 494 Application for Undergraduate Research Credits

COMM 494 TA Guidelines

COMM 496H Independent Study

Schreyer Honors College Thesis Guidelines

Office

204 Carnegie Building
814-865-1503
Contact an Adviser

Larger Map // Park: On Campus, Downtown

Policies and Procedures on Academic Integrity

Penn State and the College of Communications have adopted policies to encourage academic integrity. These policies describe activities that violate the principles of academic integrity and responsibility, including cheating on exams and plagiarism, and they provide penalties for such violations. All students should know and understand the kinds of activities that constitute violations and the range of sanctions that can be imposed.

Some examples of violations of academic integrity include, but are not limited to cheating, copying on a test, submitting previously turned-in work, misrepresentation, and plagiarism. Additional examples can be found at Penn State Erie's Position Statement on Academic Integrity.

The College of Communications Academic Integrity Policy spells out the procedure for dealing with violations. Every student in the College should read and understand the policy and be aware of their rights and responsibilities within the process.

It is very important that students understand the steps involved in working through a suspected violation of AI, what they are likely to encounter, and what happens at each step in the process. To learn about what you need to know if you are suspected of violating the academic integrity policy, please visit the Davis Program in Ethical Leadership's pages on the consequences of cheating.

Academic Integrity Policy

On August 29, 2000, the Council of Academic Deans adopted “A Statement on Academic Integrity at Penn State,” stating:

Academic integrity mandates the pursuit of teaching, learning, research, and creative activity in an open, honest, and responsible manner. An academic community that values integrity promotes the highest levels of personal honesty, respect for the rights, property, and dignity of others, and fosters an environment in which students and scholars can enjoy the fruits of their efforts. Academic integrity includes a commitment neither to engage in acts of falsification, misrepresentation, or deception, nor to tolerate such acts by other members of the community.

Academic integrity is a fundamental value at Penn State. It must be at the heart of all our endeavors and must guide our actions every day as students and as members of the faculty, administration, and staff. Because we expect new and continuing members of the University community to meet the high standards that are the foundation of a Penn State education, this message must be clear and reinforced frequently.

The College of Communications, in agreement with these principles, seeks to foster an environment of academic trust and integrity within its student body. Consistent with Senate Policy 49-20, the College shall establish a Committee on Academic Integrity to be comprised as follows: Three faculty members (at least one tenured member with graduate faculty status who will serve as Chair) appointed by the Dean; two students chosen by the Dean from a list of nominees provided by the College; and a Department Head from within the College. The Associate Dean will provide administrative support. The faculty members shall serve two-year terms. The student members may be appointed for one or two years and should be declared majors within the College.

The Committee is charged to develop and maintain a statement of principles of academic integrity suitable for inclusion in course syllabi and consistent with Senate and administrative policies. The faculty shall be asked to include that statement of academic integrity in all course syllabi and review that policy with students during the first week of classes.

The Chair of the Committee (or designate) shall participate in all orientation programs held for new students at the beginning of each semester to review the academic integrity policies and procedures.

The Associate Dean shall ensure that all full-time and part-time faculty members are informed of the College’s statement on academic integrity and that the statement and associated policy are part of the faculty orientation and faculty development procedures.

The Committee shall hear all cases involving violations of academic integrity formally brought to its attention. The starting point for all such cases is the faculty member bringing the charge. To formally process the complaint, the faculty member shall notify the Coordinator of Undergraduate Education in the office of the Associate Dean. The Associate Dean shall convene the Committee once a formal complaint has been contested.

COLLEGE OF COMMUNICATIONS

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY PROCEDURES

The process for adjudicating a formal complaint shall be as follows:

A. When Academic Dishonesty is Suspected

(1) The faculty member must communicate the specifics of the charge to the student, while taking into account the need to respect each student’s privacy and the goal of maintaining an environment that supports teaching and learning;

(2) The faculty member must explain to the student the specific academic integrity policies at issue;

(3) The faculty member may provide a cooling-off period after presenting a student with the allegation that she or he violated academic integrity;

(4) The student must be provided an opportunity to explain the conduct or respond to the faculty member’s charge;

(5) The faculty member must convey to the student the action to be taken (reduction in assigned grade, reduction in course grade, etc.) and ask the student to sign the College’s Academic Integrity Disposition Form;

(6) The faculty member must explain the options to the student (i.e., accept or contest the charges) and sanction.

(7) It is preferable that the faculty member and student meet to discuss the charges, relevant academic integrity policies, proposed disciplinary action and student options. When circumstances prohibit such a meeting, however, the instructor may communicate the relevant information by email to the student’s PSU access account.

(8) Following the faculty student meeting or email communication, the student will have five business days to respond and to sign the Academic Integrity Disposition Form, accepting or contesting the charges and sanction(s). If the student fails to sign the form within that time period, the process will move forward as if the student had accepted responsibility for the allegation.

 

B. If the Student Accepts Responsibility for the Violation and the Proposed Academic Sanction

(1) If the student accepts the charges and the faculty member’s sanction or fails to respond within the allotted time period, the Disposition Form will be considered complete, and will be delivered to the Coordinator for Undergraduate Education for transmittal to the Office of Student Conduct. This closes the academic sanction element of the case;

(2) In all cases, before submitting the Academic Integrity Form to the Office of Student Conduct for recording, it is the responsibility of the Office of the Associate Dean to determine through consultation with Student Conduct if the student has prior academic integrity violations.

(3) If a prior recorded violation is discovered after the Form has been submitted to the Coordinator for Undergraduate Education, a new academic sanction may be considered. Information concerning prior academic misconduct may not be used as a basis for judging a student’s guilt, but it may be used as a basis for imposing additional academic sanctions or deciding whether disciplinary action is also warranted.

(4) The faculty member may opt to pursue disciplinary action in conjunction with the College Academic Integrity Committee and the Office of Student Conduct.

(5) Throughout the academic integrity process, grading authority remains the responsibility of the instructor.

 

C. If the Student Does Not Admit Responsibility for an Academic Integrity Violation

(1) If the student contests the charges and/or academic sanction(s), then the faculty member forwards the case to the Academic Integrity Committee, which shall be convened to hold a hearing on the charges;

(2) Bringing the case is the responsibility of the instructor of record. If the charges are based in whole or in part on evidence or reports provided by a teaching assistant, the instructor must have reviewed the evidence or report and be willing to personally stand behind it, and it becomes part of his or her case;

(3) The student shall have the right to at least ten days notice of the hearing.  The student shall have the right to appear before the Committee to contest the charges and/or to provide additional relevant information. Such information must be submitted to the Committee at least five business days in advance of the hearing. The student will have the right to be accompanied by an advisor; to examine all relevant documents; to take notes; and to be heard in response to witnesses or evidence presented;

(4) The student may waive his or her right to attend the hearing, in which case the Committee may proceed with an administrative review based on the written record, including submissions by the student, to reach a conclusion;

(5) The faculty member shall have the right to appear before the Committee to discuss the charge.

(6) In reaching its conclusion with respect to a violation, the Committee shall be guided by the standard of clear and convincing evidence;

(7) The Committee will reach its conclusion and issue its report within ten days of the conclusion of the hearing and the submission of all relevant evidence;

(8) The student may at any time during this process revoke his or her decision to contest the allegation and accept the academic sanction imposed by the instructor, at which time the hearing process will terminate;

(9) The Committee may concur in the academic sanction proposed by the instructor or it may suggest a different sanction. In case of the latter, the Committee may meet with the instructor to discuss its suggestion. If the Committee does not find sufficient evidence to support the allegation of a violation of academic integrity, it shall recommend that no sanction be applied.

(10) The results of that hearing (and any sanction imposed) shall be reported to the Associate Dean who will, in turn, transmit the information to the Office of Student Conduct.

 

D. Disciplinary Sanctions and the “XF” Grade

(1) In any instance in which the instructor believes disciplinary sanctions are warranted, and whether or not the student has admitted responsibility, the case is forwarded to the College Academic Integrity Committee for administrative review and determination of possible academic sanctions. The case then is forwarded to the Office of Student Conduct for appropriate fact finding and judgment and possible disciplinary action, including the XF grade;

(2) An “XF” grade is a formal University disciplinary sanction;

(3) “XF” sanctions are only recorded with the concurrence of the instructor, the College Academic Integrity Committee, and the Office of Student Conduct. Reliance on the “XF” should be a rare occurrence and reserved for the most serious breaches of academic integrity;

(4) If an “XF” grade has been given and placed on the student’s permanent transcript, the student may subsequently appeal to the Committee for its removal (and replacement with an academic “F”) based on additional information not reasonably available to be provided at the original hearing. The Committee will receive and review such information, and will forward it to the Office of Student Conduct with its recommendation.

Nothing in this Policy or Procedure shall be contrary to the policies and procedures outlined in Research Administration Policy RA-10 or Administrative Policy AD-47 which set forth statement of general standards of professional ethics within the academic community, and which provide procedures to follow in cases of alleged misconduct in research or other scholarly activities that are normally handled through research administration channels.

 

College of Communications

Adopted Language on Academic Integrity

For College of Communications’ Syllabi

Academic Integrity: Academic integrity is the pursuit of scholarly and creative activity in an open, honest and responsible manner, free from fraud and deception, and is an educational objective of the College of Communications and the University. Cheating, including plagiarism, falsification of research data, using the same assignment for more than one class, turning in someone else’s work, or passively allowing others to copy your work, will result in academic penalties at the discretion of the instructor. In serious cases it could also result in suspension or dismissal from the university or in the grade of “XF’ (failed for academic dishonesty) being put on your permanent transcript.

As students studying communication, you should understand and avoid plagiarism (presenting the work of others as your own). A discussion of plagiarism, with examples, can be found at:

http://tlt.its.psu.edu/plagiarism/tutorial/cutpaste/

 

The rules and policies regarding academic integrity should be reviewed by every student, and can be found online at: www.psu.edu/ufs/policies/47-00.html#49-20, and in the College of Communications document, “Academic Integrity Policy and Procedures.” Any student with a question about academic integrity or plagiarism is strongly encouraged to discuss it with his or her instructor.

 

Updated August 2012

Academic Integrity

One of the four Penn State Principles, academic intergrity is defined by the Faculty Senate as “the pursuit of scholarly activity in an open, honest and responsible manner." Academic integrity is a basic guiding principle for all academic activity at Penn State, and all members of the University community are expected to act in accordance with this principle.

Consistent with this expectation, the University's Code of Conduct states that all students should act with personal integrity, respect other students' dignity, rights and property, and help create and maintain an environment in which all can succeed through the fruits of their efforts.

Please visit the University's full policy on Academic Integrity at PSU Faculty Senate Policy 49-20.

As a student and a member of the Penn State Community, it is important to have a clear understanding of your ethical responsibilities. As a member of the Donald P. Bellisario College of Communications and a future communications professional it is especially important that you appreciate your civic obligations and cultivate strong habits of integrity and responsibility.

Academic Intergity Disposition Form

Current Student Resources

Submit Alumni Note

Alumni Notes

Online Faculty Manual-2016

If you are interested in teaching online for the Donald P. Bellisairo College of Communications as an adjunct, please refer to our list of classes to see which ones we are currently accepting applications for.

Please note: if you are not familiar with Penn State there are two different academic units that teach communications.

The Bellisario College teaches professional communications:

  • advertising
  • public relations
  • journalism
  • film/video
  • telecommunications
  • media studies

The Department of Communication Arts and Sciences, housed in the College of the Liberal Arts, teaches the following. If you are interested in any of these subjects, please contact them directly

  • interpersonal communications
  • organic communications
  • rhetoric
  • public speaking

FACULTY MANUAL FOR TEACHING ONLINE AT PENN STATE


Welcome to online teaching! While there are many similarities between online and face-to-face teaching, there are also many differences. This site will provide you with important information about teaching online at Penn State.

BEST PRACTICES AND EXPECTATIONS FOR TEACHING ONLINE

The online learning environment presents a unique set of challenges that require clear definition of instructor performance. The following Instructor Performance Expectations are considered best practices. They identify the minimum level of interaction and management needed between students and instructors to maintain a quality online learning environment.

 

AS A COURSE INSTRUCTOR, IT IS ANTICIPATED THAT YOU WILL…

  1. Follow the established course start and end dates. When students register for your course, they expect that it will start and end as stated in the Schedule of Courses. Schedule adjustments may, however, be needed to meet deadlines for graduating students and others with special circumstances.
  2. Follow consistent guidelines for managing your online course. These guidelines identify tasks that should be performed on a daily, weekly, or semester basis.
  3. Monitor assignment submissions and communication with students to remind them of missed and/or upcoming deadlines. You can help insure a successful learning experience by practicing proactive course management strategies. Good practice suggests posting a note to your class at least once a week, to tell students what you will be covering in the coming week and to remind them of any due dates. One tool to monitor student activity is the “recent activity” feature in ANGEL.
  4. Early in the course, establish a regular schedule for when you will be logging in to the course and communicate this to students. Normally this is once per day. Many of the students studying via the World Campus are adult learners who have work and family responsibilities. These students tend to be more active in courses on weekends, so you may also wish to reserve time in your schedule to monitor courses at least once on weekends.
  5. Give prior notice to your students and to the administrative unit overseeing your course (e.g., your academic department for resident courses or World Campus Student Services, at pennstateonline@psu.edu, for World Campus courses) in the event that you will be unable to log into the course for several days or more (e.g., during professional travel). Providing this information up front will help to forestall many student inquiries. You should also consider finding coverage for your online course if you are going to be out of contact with students for more than a couple of days, especially if they are to be working on assignments while you are gone. If you will be away from the course in cases of personal emergency, you are asked to notify students and the administrative unit overseeing your course as soon as possible.
  6. Provide feedback to student inquiries within one business day. Because online learners must manage their time carefully, timely instructor feedback is especially important to them. If you cannot provide a detailed response within one business day, it is good practice to respond to the student within one business day to let them know when you will provide them a more detailed response.
  7. Provide meaningful feedback on student work using clear and concise language. You have ideal “teachable moments” when providing feedback on student work. Simply telling a student "good job" or "needs work" does not give them the information they need to succeed. They need (and want!) more specifics. What was it that made the work good? (So they can do it again!) What needs more work and how can they improve the quality of their work? (Specifically!)
  8. Communicate to your students in advance when you will grade and return all assignments and exams. Online students need to self-regulate their time and learning and will need to adapt as needed. If you do not tell them this information, students will likely ask you to provide it.
  9. Provide a teaching and learning environment that supports academic freedom, as outlined in University Policy HR64. Penn State faculty are entitled to freedom in the online classroom in discussing their subjects. Students must also be free to express their opinions without fear of ridicule, intimidation, or retaliation by any instructor. Consistent with Policy HR64 “Faculty members are expected to present information fairly, and to set forth justly, the divergent opinions of other investigators that arise out of scholarly methodology and professionalism.”
  10. Make sure you have immediate and predictable access to the same technology that is required for students in your course. Your course syllabus is an excellent place to communicate to your students the technology they must have in place to effectively participate in your online courses. You will want to make sure you are also using a computer system and network that can meet those technology requirements. World Campus courses typically list that information in the course catalog listing for the course. General World Campus technical requirements are posted online as part of the World Campus web site.
  11. In accordance with University policy, post final course grades to eLion within two business days of the course end date and/or receipt of the final assignment/exam. If you think that you will not be able to meet that requirement due to the nature of your course assessments, please discuss this with the administrative unit overseeing your course.
  12. Encourage your students to complete your end-of-course survey (typically, the SRTE). Penn State uses an online version of the SRTE. Students access their SRTEs through their profile page in ANGEL. At the end of the semester, the SRTE system generates an email to students to announce the availability of their SRTEs. This message includes instructions on where to complete them and how long they are available. Automated email reminder messages are sent to students who have outstanding forms to complete. (For more information, see “Frequently asked questions about online SRTEs.”).  SRTE forms may be changed, but these changes must be discussed with your academic program administrator. For more details on this process, please refer to the “Creating and editing forms for campuses, colleges, and academic units” Web site.

Research has shown that the strongest influence on whether a student completes an end-of-course survey is you, the instructor! Please send your students a note encouraging them to complete the survey and assuring them that the information that will be used to improve the course is important.

MANAGING STUDENT EXPECTATIONS


Managing student expectations is an important task as your course begins. You will be doing a great deal to help ensure your course runs smoothly and that your students know you are there for them by providing them with information about key elements of your course, such as:

  • how—and how quickly—you will grade assignments;
  • how often you will check—and respond to—course communications like email and discussion postings;
  • how and when you will conduct office hours. Refer to some of the “Best Practices” at the beginning of this guide paying particular attention to numbers 3 – 8.

There are various areas in your online course that can be helpful in communicating this information to your students. The course syllabus should include your course grading rubric, as well as any specific grading policies that you follow. Weekly emails or creating announcements using the announcements feature (located under the Communications Tab and Resources tab in ANGEL) of your course Web site is another way in which you can communicate with your students. This site can be updated regularly to help you keep your students informed about your virtual office hours, changes to your schedule, lesson expectations, and grading/communication turnaround time.

 

EMPLOYMENT INFORMATION

 

COMPENSATION
Compensation for online teaching varies widely across the University system. Current faculty may be teaching online as part of their normal teaching load, while others may receive supplemental pay for teaching that exceeds their normal duties. Still other individuals may be hired as independent contractors (adjuncts) by an academic department. Please contact your supervisor or academic department financial officer if you have questions regarding your payment for your online teaching assignment.

 

FAMILY EDUCATIONAL RIGHTS AND PRIVACY ACT (FERPA) TRAINING

All employees who will be accessing the data warehouse or access to any database containing student data must complete a FERPA quiz. For more information about FERPA and this policy, see the “FERPA Tutorial” page.

 

“REPORTING CHILD ABUSE” TRAINING
Penn State requires all employees to take training on how to recognize and report suspected child abuse, through Policy AD72. Students and volunteers who are considered "authorized adults" (those who work with children and have responsibility for children's programs) also are required to take the training.

The mandatory training course, "Building a Safe Penn State: Reporting Child Abuse," is available online. For complete details about this training requirement, see the “About the Content for the online Reporting Child Abuse Training” Web page.

 

COURSE TECHNOLOGY


Faculty teaching online courses need to have consistent and predictable access to the same technology as is required for student participation. Course design and technology requires access to high-speed Internet access (DSL, cable modem, or satellite). Please refer to the World Campus list of “Technical Requirements” to make sure that you meet the technical requirements.

For technical assistance with your online course, contact your campus Help Desk. If you are unsure where to turn, contact the IT Service Desk at mailto:ITServiceDesk@psu.edu or (814) 865-HELP and they will put you in contact with the individuals who can help you!

online course contacts


INSTRUCTIONAL INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY AGREEMENTS
Online course materials are governed by University Policy IP03 Courseware.

 

REGISTRATION


ENROLLMENT CAPS AND INSTRUCTOR WORKLOAD
All semester-based courses have maximum section sizes. The World Campus works with each academic department to set enrollment caps that are appropriate for the course topic and online course design.

In general, the minimum enrollment for a course to run is 10 students but exceptions are sometimes made in both directions (a few more or a few less). If your course will be cancelled due to low enrollment, Shannon Kennan will contact you as soon as possible.

COMM also maintains control over the maximum number of students enrolled in a course. This number varies depending on the type of course, level and curriculum. But, with few exceptions, we will not add more students to your course than its posted limit.

To view which courses are being offered each semester and monitor enrollment, go to: http://schedule.psu.edu/


STUDENT SCHEDULING FOR WORLD CAMPUS COURSES
All students in semester-based courses schedule through the University’s eLion online registration, according to the priority registration schedule. Students currently enrolled at other campuses cannot use the online system to register for online courses at other campuses (including the World Campus); these students must contact Student Enrollment Services to request registration.

Please refer all such requests to the World Campus Office of Student Enrollment Services (800 252-3592; registrar@outreach.psu.edu) rather than approving these requests, since the availability of materials needs to be confirmed before increasing enrollment caps. In addition, the course may already have a waiting list of students who need your course for graduation.  You may also want to encourage students to use the “Watch” feature in eLion.

 

OVERRIDES
Please do not approve students into your courses as an override without consulting with Shannon Kennan (skennan@psu.edu) first. As mentioned above, we closely monitor and guard the upper enrollment levels of all of our courses because the enrollment caps are set to ensure the highest possible educational quality. Approving two or three extra students as overrides may not seem like much, but it adds time onto your weekly grading load as well as divides your attention among more students. Any time you have students requesting an override, please notify Shannon.

 

COURSE PREREQUISITES
Penn State’s registration system does not currently prevent students from scheduling courses for which they have not completed the prerequisites. Therefore, instructors are encouraged to review student prerequisites at the beginning of the course. eLion provides instructors with a list of students who have not met the prerequisites. [From the left side bar in eLion, select “Prereq Class List.”]

If you believe that specific prerequisites are imperative, you may want to send an email to these students to emphasize the importance of completing course prerequisites. Sometimes a student’s life experiences may convince an instructor that a specific student can successfully complete the course without the prerequisite. Penn State is developing strategies to incorporate prior learning through Prior Learning Assessment (PLA). To learn more about PLA, visit a conversation featuring Dr. Pat Shope, Enrollment Services Specialist in the Adult Learner Advocacy Office at Penn State Outreach and Online Education.

Instructors have the prerogative to refuse admission to a class if it appears obvious that this will not be a successful learning experience for the student. In such cases, students should be told to drop the course via eLion if the course is in eLion. If students do not comply by dropping the course, please contact your department office (for resident education courses) or the World Campus Registrar (for World Campus courses) for assistance.

 

COURSE DROPS
If students in your class approach you about the procedure for dropping a course, please encourage them to discuss this action with an advisor to assure that dropping the course will not negatively impact progress to degree or financial aid eligibility. Further down, you will find more information on the financial ramifications for student drops related to grade reporting.

For resident education students: See the information on Dropping Courses from the Office of the University Registrar.

For World Campus students: The World Campus policy and procedures for dropping a course are posted on the Student Enrollment Services Web site. During the standard drop-add period, drops and adds can be made directly by students through eLion.


ACADEMIC INTEGRITY


Every College and campus has its own Academic Integrity policy and procedure. It is important that you find the policy to which your academic unit adheres so that you know the parameters, definitions, and procedures. The World Campus does not have a separate academic integrity policy and upholds the University policy and College processes.

There are many helpful resources related to academic integrity:

FAIR USE
A frequent concern is use of copyrighted material in your course. As you are teaching, you may locate items such as articles, handouts, or diagrams that you wish to send out to students enrolled in your course. One of the issues that the University asks us to be very careful of, for legal reasons, is the inclusion of externally copyrighted materials. If any article or handout you wish to use has been pulled from a textbook, journal, or other external source, it may need to be cleared for copyright permission before it can be distributed to students. The clearance process can take time and can significantly add to the cost of course materials.

Factors related to fair use should be examined to determine whether the items you wish to use require clearance. Some items, such as materials produced by the government or items that have passed out of copyright protection, are available for use without going through the formal clearance process. There are also individuals and organizations that create useful materials and clearly indicate that those materials may be used “for educational purposes.” Some publishers do not permit their publications to be placed in an electronic environment such as the Web; others stipulate that items may be used if the site is protected in some manner.

One option to consider is to use the Electronic Reserve system through the University Libraries. The library can provide fair and accessible online resources for courses. For more information on use of the eReserve system, visit the “Electronic Reserve Request Form” page.

For additional information, please visit the Copyright Perspectives Fair Use Web site.

If you are unsure where to find the information you need to determine what materials you can use in your course that fall within fair use, consult with your instructional designer or your College librarian.

 

STUDENT USE OF COPYRIGHTED MATERIALS
If your students create Web pages of their own as part of their course work, it would be beneficial to discuss with them in advance the liability that can arise regarding the placement of copyrighted materials – such as software, film or music clips, photos or articles from magazines – on their Web sites. Students, instructors, and employees of the University who violate copyright law and other conduct standards place the University in legal jeopardy. Further, according to Policy AD20 Computer and Network Security, “Transmitting or making accessible offensive, obscene or harassing materials, and transmitting or making accessible chain letters, etc., are prohibited.”

Faculty who become aware of a potential problem regarding the electronic distribution of copyrighted materials or other materials that would violate University computing policies are advised to contact the student and request that he or she remove it, or that such behavior immediately desist. Misuse of University resources such as Web space and electronic mail accounts can result in the suspension of computing privileges for the offending user.

 

PUBLIC ACCESS TO YOUR COURSE
Student data (such as name, address, major, etc.) is protected by The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA). This Act indicates that information from records, files, and data directly related to a student shall not be disclosed by any means (including telephone) to individuals or agencies outside the University without the signed, dated consent of the student in writing, except pursuant to a lawful subpoena or court order. By sharing course postings, e-mails, assignment submissions, etc., you would be in danger of violating a student’s rights.

Check with your academic administrative unit for alternative options for granting public access to or sharing student content in your course.

 

GRADING

 

UNIVERSITY GRADING POLICIES
Instructors are encouraged to become familiar with Faculty Senate Policies 47-00, 48-00, and 49-00 regarding grades. Please pay particular attention to the two main components of policy 47-20, Basis for Grades:

  1. This policy emphasizes that students’ grades are to be based on the instructor’s judgment of student scholastic achievement. The instructor is considered the academic authority within a course he or she is teaching, with the backup of the academic unit offering the course.
  2. This policy states that the basis for grades must be provided to students in writing at the start of the course. An explanation of how final course grades are determined should be stated in the course syllabus, but you should review that document to confirm that your grading basis is properly relayed. You are encouraged to be familiar with the published grading system and to use it in determining student grades.

POSTING GRADES IN ELION

secure i.d. token

Within 48 hours after the final exam or final assessment of the course, student grades must be entered by instructors in eLion, a Web-based service for students, advisors, faculty, and parents that provides secure real-time access to academic and financial records in the University's administrative database. Access to eLion is automatically granted when you are identified as the instructor for a course. (If you do not have access, check with your academic department.)

In COMM, there is some flexibility with the 48-hour rule. For example, if you are teaching a course where the final assessment is a multiple-choice exam you will need to have grades entered in eLion within 48 hours. If you are teaching a course where the final project is a 10-page research paper you may need longer than 48-hours to finish grading.

Always enter graduating seniors’ grades into eLion as soon as possible. They need their grades reported promptly to meet the Registrar’s graduation deadlines (see below).

In order to input your course grades through eLion, you will need a securID token (also referred to as a “second factor authentication token”) Please contact your academic department to obtain this token (see above).

At the end of the semester, you will receive an automated e-mail message indicating that you can submit your final course grades to eLion. Please note that you cannot submit grades until the semester ends, which is the timing of the automated e-mail message. Your first step in reporting grades is to log in at the eLion Web site. (Choose the “Faculty” link from the main screen.)

Need help? See “Help for Grade Entry”on eLion.

 

ELION GRADE REPORTING REQUIREMENTS
If a student seems to have stopped participating in your course, does not respond to you, and their grade is reported as an “F”, their financial aid must be reviewed to fulfill the federal regulations of Return to Title IV funds (federal grants and loans).

When a grade of "F" is assigned, the Office of Student Aid must make a determination whether or not the grade was "earned" or the result of a student "walking away" from the class (ceasing enrollment) without taking the proper academic action (dropping the class).

Noting the student's Last Date of Attendance (LDA) in a class is a critical component in the federal review of a student record in the determination of student aid adjustments. The LDA should be recorded as the last day of participation in an academically-related activity. Simply logging in to the course isn't sufficient. The accurate reporting of student’s LDA, when assigning the “F” grade, supports the University’s responsibility in compliance with federal regulations.

For more information visit the “eLion Grade Reporting” site.

 

GRADES FOR GRADUATING SENIORS
Students who plan to graduate are advised to communicate directly with their instructors to ensure that all work can be completed and graded in time for graduation. It may be necessary for a student to submit assignments or take exams early in order to assure that you have time to determine a final grade.

The deadline for instructors to post final course grades in eLion for graduating students is typically the Wednesday before commencement, though it may vary—your graduation list letter will state the exact date that grades are due for graduating seniors.

 

DEFERRED GRADES
A student can request a deferred grade (DF) if he or she is “prevented from completing a course within the prescribed time” (University Policy 48-40). These requests may be made due to illness (their own or a family member’s), injury, death in the family, traumatic life events, natural disasters, or similar circumstances.

Deferred grades are governed by University Policy 48-40: Deferred Grades. All requests for deferred grades are negotiated between you and your students, provided the student has completed the requisite minimum portion of the course (as defined by the college where the course originates). Dates and deadlines for deferred grades can be found at the University Registrar Web site.

There are positive and negative reasons for granting a DF. Positive reasons for the student is time to cope with the situation that prompted the DF and to finish the course without losing money or academic credit. However, the student must complete the work independently without the support of a cohort or much attention from the instructor. A negative effect for the instructor is a carry-over of grading responsibilities once the student turns in his or her delayed assignments.

It is important to work with the student and to establish a communication plan and a clear schedule for completion. At the undergraduate level, all coursework must be complete and grades must be entered into eLion ten weeks after the course end date. If the course is not completed within the agreed-upon time frame, you should plan to submit the student’s final grade based on completed lessons.

If you agree to grant a deferred grade, post "DF" for the grade in eLion at the end of the semester. DF grades automatically convert to an F if they are not updated by the deadline. Once the grade has automatically changed to an F, you will still have one academic year to submit a change of grade. If you wish to change a grade more than one academic year after the course was offered, you will need to pursue this change through the Faculty Senate.

Students who have not finished during the allotted amount of time may request an extension of the deferred grade. Normally the student should have some kind of extenuating circumstance to justify such an additional extension. If you approve the extension, please contact Student Enrollment Services; the new approved end date of the course will be need to be recorded, as this is reported to the University Registrar.

 

POLICY INFORMATION FOR WORLD CAMPUS STUDENTS
World Campus students have access to student policies via their Student Enrollment Services Web site. This site includes information on World Campus policies and procedures for actions such as academic integrity, course drops, deferred grades, and the grading system, as well as general information on time management, study habits, and writing skills. Faculty are encouraged to review these policies prior to beginning to teach online.

 

HANDLING PROCTORED EXAMS FOR WORLD CAMPUS STUDENTS
In World Campus delivered courses that utilize proctored exams, instructors should put the exam grades in the ANGEL grade book and provide any feedback to students through ANGEL. The exams are not made available to the student, as the exams do not change each semester and may be used again. For review purposes, a student may contact the World Campus Student Services Office to request that the exam be sent back to the proctor. The student may then review the exam with their proctor. If the student has any questions regarding the exam, they can be written on the exam or an additional piece of paper. The exam and any questions should then be returned to World Campus Student Services, where they will be forwarded to the instructor. Under no circumstances are students permitted to make copies of exam content.

For more information on proctored exams through the World Campus, visit the “Taking Exams and Securing a Proctor” Web site.


COURSE MATERIALS

 

MAKING MODIFICATIONS TO YOUR ONLINE COURSE
As an instructor you may be interested in making modifications to your course as you teach throughout the semester. However, before making any content-related changes or additions you should contact your department head or the instructional designer (if provided) for the course, as your academic unit may have special policies and procedures for how such changes are made. Some academic units may not allow individual instructors to make any changes to a particular online course, while others may provide instructors with the freedom to change, update or personalize the content. It is important for you to know the parameters your academic unit has in place.

 

WORKING WITH AN INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGNER
Most online courses at Penn State are developed with the assistance of an instructional designer (also known as a “learning designer”). An instructional designer (ID) is an education expert who specializes in pedagogy and technology. Instructional designers work with faculty content experts to create online courses that are informed by tested learning theories, research, and practices. In addition to helping develop an online course, the ID often assists with the delivery of the course each semester by getting it ready for new instructors and handling technical issues. Your ID might be housed within your academic unit or may work for the World Campus.

online course contacts


Assuming you have the liberty to make changes to the online course you are teaching, your instructional designer can explain the structure of the course and advise you of potential pitfalls and ramifications such as:

  • the need to connect new assessments to your gradebook;
  • the impact of making your online course available to your students before the semester begins;
  • the relationship between the current assessments and stated learning objectives;
  • the cautions and issues related to merging course sections;
  • how changes to content pages may impact the course syllabus;
  • how to make sure additional readings are available on e-reserves;
  • the impact of modifying scaffolded activities.

In addition, if your desired modifications are beyond small changes your instructional designer may direct you to your department head or the World Campus program manager for your course to discuss the timing of a larger revision.

 

POSTING OF REQUIRED COURSE MATERIALS, INCLUDING TECHNOLOGIES
The Higher Education Opportunity Act (Public Law 110-315) requires that the University post all materials, technology requirements, and costs at the time a course becomes available on the Schedule of Courses and, if applicable, the World Campus Course Catalog. Any changes to, or removal of, previously released material will affect both the course content and student finances. Changes may also affect the technological relationships within the course. For this reason, instructors should never change materials or technology related to a course without first consulting the administrative unit overseeing the course.

 

ACCESS AFTER THE COURSE ENDS
Unless you deactivate the course site, students (and you) will continue to have access to your password-protected course materials for one year from the last day of the course, provided their Penn State Access user ID and password remain valid. (Students must continue to be registered for Penn State courses in order to maintain a valid Penn State Access account.)

Even after your course has officially ended, some students will continue to check back into the course to review material and check their grades. Because you will not continue to check into the course every day, you should post a message to your course announcements, discussion group, and/or e-mail to let your students know that if they need you after that date, they should contact you directly through e-mail. Be sure that your students have your University e-mail address. This way, a student is discouraged to post something to the course bulletin board or to your course-specific e-mail account expecting an answer from you.


SAVING STUDENT WORK
In the future you may wish to distribute to your students examples of “exceptional” student essays, papers, etc., from past offerings of the course. This is a good idea, as it permits students currently enrolled in the course to develop a better understanding of your expectations for their performance. Students frequently comment on the usefulness of such examples, and request that more such examples be included in online courses. One of the issues that you need to consider is that ownership of student work submitted during participation in a course still rests with the student. If you wish to distribute such items or include them in your course in an ongoing manner (for example, by placing them on a course Web site), you should clear the use of these items with the original authors (getting such permission in writing is a good idea). It would also be a good idea to find out whether the student wishes to have his/her name associated with an example when it is used in the course.


PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

 

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT RESOURCES
Units across the University offer a wealth of professional development resources related to teaching and learning online. The Web Learning @ Penn State Web site includes a listing of many of these resources, from web-based materials to speaker series and workshops.

 

WORLD CAMPUS OPPORTUNITIES
World Campus Faculty Development offers online courses to provide faculty with an “online student experience” while exploring a rich variety of critical topics necessary for mastery in the online classroom.

The Certificate for Online Teaching is a professional development program to prepare for online teaching success. This fully online, five course series provides faculty an “online student experience” while exploring a rich variety of critical topics necessary for mastery in the online classroom.

The Penn State World Campus Faculty Convocation is a gathering of online faculty and teaching and learning practitioners to focus on trends and ideas concerning online education. This is an opportunity to create a space for rich dialogue and community especially for those who are often unable to meet face to face.

All Penn State faculty are invited to participate in Faculty Development activities and some academic programs may require faculty to complete one or more of these online offerings. More information on these programs and how to register for courses can be found at the Outreach and Online Education Faculty Development Web site.


ACCESSIBILITY AND USABILITY


At Penn State, we are committed to providing a welcoming, encouraging, and empowering environment for students with disabilities to ensure equal access, full participation and reasonable accommodations for their academic pursuits. If a student with a disability self-identifies to you and requests accommodations, please direct the student to contact Office of Disability Services (814-863-1807) as soon as possible.

You are not required to provide accommodations for students with disabilities unless you have been provided with a letter from a Penn State Office of Disabilities specifying the academic accommodations for which the student is eligible. This might involve extended time for exams, textbooks in alternate formats, etc. The process of determining a student’s disability and eligibility for appropriate accommodations can be a relatively lengthy one, and the earlier it begins, the sooner the appropriate accommodations may be provided.

In some cases, you will not be providing the adjustments directly, but you need to be aware that such accommodations are being provided. While the student may or may not disclose to you the nature of the disability, this information will not be specified in any communication you receive from ODS.

For more information see:

World Campus Faculty Development offers an online course, OL 1800 Accessibility, for which faculty may register and complete at any time. It is an asynchronous, independent study model. To register for OL1800, see the Outreach and Online Education Faculty Development Web site. 

 

COURSE-RELATED DISPUTES


Penn State can assist faculty and students with course-related issues that may improve through resolution or mediation with a third-party representative.

You may contact Shannon Kennan (skennan@psu.edu) for advice about how COMM handles student issues or for World Campus course-related student concerns, you may contact the World Campus at wdresolution@outreach.psu.edu or (814) 865-6285. Additionally, if you are teaching your course through the World Campus, the World Campus staff may contact you regarding a student’s concern in your course.

 

STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES


If you are teaching a World Campus course, many offices can help you and your students with questions:

If an instructor of a graduate course has a question regarding advising, he or she needs to contact the academic department for the name of the graduate advisor.

To reach World Campus Academic Advising, Academic Support, Career Services, or Disability Services by phone:

  1. Dial 800-252-3592
  2. Select option 1 for World Campus
  3. Select option 5 for Academic Advising, Career Counseling, or Disability Services
  4. Select the option that meets your needs


World Campus Technical Support is available by phone, chat or email.

Do you work with military students and veterans? See the World Campus Web page related to Military & Veteran Services.

College Committees

2016-17 College of Communications Committee Appointments 

Executive Committee: Marie Hardin, Jane Agnelly, Bob Baukus, Russ Eshleman, Matt Jackson, Shannon Kennan, Bob Martin, Matt McAllister, Karen Mozley-Bryan, Kevin Musick, Anthony Olorunnisola, Jamey Perry, Ford Risley, Steve Sampsell, Joe Selden, Maura Shea, Chad Simpson.

Dean's Advisory Committee: John Affleck, George Anghelcev, Rod Bingaman, Marcia DiStaso, Rob Frieden, Anne Hoag, Matt Jordan, Mary Beth Oliver, Bu Zhong

P & T -- Departments Committee: Lee Ahern, Denise Bortree, Matt Jordan, Matt McAllister, Mary Beth Oliver (Alternate: Bu Zhong)

P & T -- College Committee: Colleen Connolly-Ahern, Russell Frank, Rob Frieden, Patrick Parsons, Bob Richards (Alternate: Michael Schmierbach)

Curriculum and Liaison Committee: Colleen Connolly-Ahern (chair, ad/pr), Richie Sherman (film-video), John Affleck (journalism), Michael Schmierbach (media studies), David Norloff (telecommunications)

Academic Integrity: Ford Risley (administrator), Denise Bortree (chair, ad/pr, ends 2018), Maura Shea (film-video, ends, 2018), Russ Eshleman (journalism, ends, 2018), Kevin Hagopian (media studies, ends, 2018), Yael Warshel (telecommunications, ends, 2018), Azeta Hatef (GSIC appointee), Katie McFadden (Student Council delegate)

Assessment Advisory Committee: Frank Dardis (advertising), Rod Bingaman (film-video), Russ Eshleman (journalism), Michael Elavsky (media studies), Marcia DiStaso (public relations), Ben Cramer (telecommunications) 

Sabbatical Committee: Patrick Parsons (chair), Lee Ahern, Bob Baukus, Marcia DiStaso

Faculty Meeting Chair: Frank Dardis (2016-18)

Ombudsman: Marcia DiStaso (2014-2017), Michel Haigh (alternate)

Exit Interview Officer: Marcia DiStaso (2014-2017)

Graduate Committee: Matt McAllister (chair), Lee Ahern (ad/pr), Mary Beth Oliver (film-video and media studies), Bu Zhong (journalism), Patrick Parsons (telecommunications), Michelle Rodino-Colocino (graduate council, ex-officio)

Student Scholarships: Janet Klinefelter (chair), Joe Selden, Jamey Perry, Bill Mahon (ad/pr), Pearl Gluck (film-video), Will Yurman (journalism), Sascha Meinrath (telecommunications)

Diversity Advisory Committee: Marie Hardin (co-chair), Joe Selden (co-chair), Robin Bierly, Yu-tai Chung, Jo Dumas, Matt Jackson, Shannon Kennan, Karen Mozley-Bryan, John Sanchez, Chad Simpson, Ken Yednock, Erica Hilton (graduate student), Alana Richardson (undergraduate student)

Equipment Committee: Karen Mozley-Bryan (chair), John Beale, Maria Cabrera Baukus, Marty Camden, Yu-tai Chung, Jim Dugan, Matt Jackson, Ann Kuskowski, Chris Maurer, Steve Reighard, Richie Sherman, Brian Shoenfelt, Zachary Shourds, Mike Zelazny

United Way: Steve Sampsell (chair), Frank Dardis, Janet Klinefelter, Sherry Kyler, Trey Miller

University Committees

Graduate Council: Michelle Rodino-Colocino (ends 2018), Russell Frank (alternate, ends 2018), Lee Ahern (Committee on Fellowships and Awards), Marcia DiStaso (Subcommittee on New and Revised Programs and Courses)
University Faculty Senate: Michel Haigh (ends 2017), Colleen Connolly-Ahern (ends 2018), Marcia DiStaso (ends 2018), Matt Jordan (alternate)

Monday Memos

Summer 2017

Spring 2017

 

 

 

Fall 2016

Summer 2016

Spring

 2016

Fall 2015

Summer 2015

Spring 2015

Fall

 2014

Summer 2014

Faculty Staff Resources

What's New

  • The Student Health Insurance Task Force webpage is now active. It includes a variety of information including the task force charge, members and a detailed list of FAQs. The Task Force is providing a report and recommendations to Provost Jones in early August and welcomes input from the University community. Questions and suggestions can be directed to the Task Force through their webpage.
  • A March, 2014, reminder from Nick Jones, Provost: In accordance with Penn State Policy HR35, campaigning for or supporting the campaigns of any political candidates should not be conducted during work hours or at work-related events and cannot be conducted using any Penn State resources, including a Penn State e-mail account or databases. While it is an individual's right to support whomever he or she chooses in an election, that support should not be presented in any way as an endorsement by the University at large or any part of the University.
  • Box at Penn State is a secure, cloud-based file storage, sharing, and collaboration service that is free for all Penn State faculty, staff, and students. Using Box allows you to upload and share files/folders from any device in addition to creating project teams that can comment directly on a file. You also receive 50 GB of storage space, which is ideal for image and presentation files. Interested parties can register for ITS Training Services sessions, which offer in-person training and online training sessions. You are also able to access the Quick Start Guide, which highlights the basics of Box at Penn State. Please contact itstraining@psu.edu if you have questions about the various training opportunities.

Academic Integrity

Benefits/Human Resources

College Committees

Computer Virus Protection

Executive Committee Meetings

First Year Seminars

Information for faculty teaching First Year Seminars.

Letterhead Template

ListServes

  • Faculty/Staff: l-comm-facstaff@lists.psu.edu
  • Faculty: l-comm-faculty@lists.psu.edu
  • Staff: l-comm-staff@lists.psu.edu

Only authorized users may send mail on the lists. Please contact Tasha Smith (tce105@psu.edu) or Sherry Kyler (slk31@psu.edu) for information.

Monday Memos

The Monday Memo lists college events and announcements, as well as news about faculty, staff, students and alumni. The memo is e-mailed weekly during the academic year and every other week during the summer.

Previous Memos

Policies & Guidelines for Faculty

  • Academic Administrative Policies and Procedures Manual
    For information on academic policies and procedures such as those for attendance and final exams.
  • Awards, Honoraria
    Policy on Awards, Honoraria and Other Tokens of Appreciation for Faculty, Staff, Students, Lecturers/Speakers and other campus visitors. 
  • College's Operating Guidelines
  • Core Council letters
  • Digital Measures
    Digital Measures is the College's system for reporting faculty research, teaching, and service activities. Any questions can be directed to Elaine Files.
  • Faculty Activity Cards are submitted electronically in the State Mandated Collection System (SMCS). This can be found online in the Employee Self-Service Information Center (ESSIC). After logging on to ESSIC, faculty will see a link for the State Mandated Collection System in the navigation menu on the left of the screen. Faculty will no longer be submitting hard copies of scantron sheets to Sherry Kyler. Please submit your hours using the State Mandated Collection System by the end of the semester. Detailed instructions about SMCS can be found at here. Questions regarding the new process should be directed to Jane Agnelly or Annette Jones.
  • Faculty Handbook
  • Faculty Senate Resources Page
    Curricular information and links to university sites on issues such as Academic Integrity, assessment, first-year engagement, faculty rights and responsibilities, and more.
  • GURU (General University Reference Utility)
    University forms, policies, procedures and more.
  • Identity Finder Program: The University requires that each unit identifies, removes, and/or protects Personally Identifiable Information (PII), on all Penn State desktops, laptops, and servers and it is important that the College is in compliance. Identity Finder is a tool that automatically runs in order to locate PII, and it is the responsibility of each user to review the results. Identity Finder can also be run manually on an Apple/Mac by going to Applications and selecting "Identify Finder" or on a Windows/PC by clicking the Windows Icon, "All Programs" and then Identity Finder. Tutorials are available for Windows and for Mac systems. Please contact IT Support at 865-1233 with questions.
  • Letters of Recommendation
    FERPA states the letter may reveal information about the student's educational record ONLY IF the student has provided prior written consent. The Registrar's Office has issued a request form to better facilitate the gathering of consent.
  • Mandatory Training: Faculty and staff are required to complete an online training module on how to report suspected child abuse. Each calendar year, you will need to obtain your certification by receiving an 80% or better on the assessment at the end of the online training. Keep a copy of the Certificate of Completion for your records.You should have received an email from Skillsoft with a user name and a temporary password that enables you to access the training. If you did not receive an email, please contact the Center for Workplace Learning & Performance at learning@psu.edu or 865-8216.
  • Posters Policy: Outlines use of posters in Carnegie Building display space for College of Communications events.

PowerPoint Template

Professional Communication

The Faculty Communities is an initiative of the University Faculty Senate to promote communication within disciplines across all Penn State locations. Any Penn State faculty or staff member may access the Faculty Communities Hub.

Research Resources

  • GURU (General University Reference Utility)
  • Office of Sponsored Programs
    • Find Funding (funding searches, Faculty Research Expertise Database of Investigators at Penn State and The Milton S. Hershey School of Medicine
    • Prepare Proposals (proposal guidelines and tutorials, write a proposal, develop a budget, agency forms and guidelines)
  • Proposal Processing:
    • Contact your research coordinator, Elaine Files, with key words for your funding searches.
    • If you are interested in submitting a proposal, please send Elaine an email with a link to the Request for Proposal (RFP) once you have decided to submit.
    • Attach the Proposal Information Form with the first six areas complete (budget portion will be completed at a later time). *Note: Depending on the funder and their requirements, submission time could range from three (3) weeks to several months.
    • A scheduled, initial meeting with Elaine will help to work through the process and timeline for the proposal submission.
    • Budget information can be completed with the help of the research coordinator. Use of the budget portion of the Proposal Information Form can aid in that discussion.
  • Qualtrics -- If you are interested in gaining access to Qualtrics, login to https://pennstate.qualtrics.com with your Penn State user ID and password. Once you have created an account email Yu-Tai Chung requesting a Qualtrics Upgrade Code. If you are planning to use Qualtrics with your class, include an eLion class list in your email.
  • Rates & Schedules (per diem lookup tool, car rental rates, graduate assistants table of stipends)
  • Research Protections (human participant research, responsible conduct)
  • Scholarship and Research Integrity -- Faculty who are working with undergraduate students on research should make sure those students have completed an online training module on ethics and best practices in research. Completion of this training is required by the university. For more information: http://www.research.psu.edu/training/sari.
  • University Policy Manual (research administration policies and guidelines)

Teaching Resources

  • Accessibility
  • COMM 494 Form -- Application for Undergraduate Reasearch (Updated 2016)
  • COMM 496 & COMM 496H Forms -- Application for Independent Study (Updated 2016)
  • FAQs on the University's Attendance Policy (Updated FA 11)
  • Final Exams: See Faculty Senate Policy 44-20
  •  Financial Literacy Guide for faculty and students
  • First Year Seminars: Info about course requirements, releated activity ideas and more.
  • Handling crises in the classroom: Should faculty members encounter a troubled student in their class, the University offers various ways to help the student. If the student is not an immediate danger to self or others, you can advise the student to call CAPS, or you can call CAPS (3-0395) to get counsel from the pros about how to address the student. If you believe the student could be a danger to self or others, call University Police Services (3-1111) or 911.  Other resources include:
  • Interfaith Holiday Absences: The Center for Ethics and Religious Affairs has compiled an Interfaith Holiday Listing that specifies holy days of the major world religions. Students may request exemptions from class attendance and other University obligations. See Faculty Senate Policy 42-27.
  • Media Commons is a university-wide initiative to enrich the teaching and learning experience through multimedia technology, classroom training and direct support for students, faculty and staff. To learn more, contact Ryan Wetzel at rlw32@psu.edu or 814-867-3695. If you are interested in scheduling a classroom workshop, please complete the On Demand Workshop request form.
  • Ordering textbooks:
    • bookrequest.psu.edu(password-protected site). A form should be completed for each course you teach. (If you don't plan to use a textbook, you should still complete the form so students know.).
    • Faculty are also able to submit their textbook information online using Faculty Enlight.
    • Desk copies: Please visit facultycenter.net or notify Sherry Kyler (slk31@psu.edu).
  • Syllabus reminders and classroom-related reminders for faculty (Updated July 2014)
  • Teaching and Learning with Technology
  • Teaching with Technology certificates: Faculty members and graduate students teaching in the College of Communications can earn TWT certificates by visiting http://advising.psu.edu/epr.htm or emailing Shannon Kennan
  • Technology Learning Assistant (TLA) program: Faculty members may apply to have a technology-savvy student provide one-on-one assistance on a range of issues. To learn more or make a request, please visit http://tlt.its.psu.edu/tla/.
  • Tips for encouraging students to complete their SRTEs
  • Instructors using Turnitin writing assessment service are urged to always use their PSU Access Account email address consisting of their user ID (ie: xyz123@psu.edu) and NOT their PSU email alias (ie: lastname@psu.edu) or another non-PSU account, such as Gmail. Failure to do so could affect how Turnitin grades and classes are processed. Instructors should remind their students to use their PSU access account email within Turnitin. Questions should be directed to turnitin@psu.edu.

Travel/Purchasing Info and Resources

Weather Policies & Information

Journal of Information Policy

The Journal of Information Policy is an open access, peer-reviewed professional journal providing insight on issues of technology and communication for policymakers in an online format. The journal is the first online/print-on-demand journal for Penn State Press, which took on the journal in 2015.

Growth in demand, either through views or downloads through JSTOR or Project MUSE, has grown exponentially. Monthly article views and PDF downloads on JSTOR for instance, grew from 3,012 in March 2015 to 6,499 in December 2016.

FACT Working Group

The Future of American Communications (FACT) Working Group, consisting of 16 scholars from 11 leading American universities working under the auspices of the Institute for Information Policy in the College of Communications at Penn State, has produced a volume titled “… And Communications for All: A Policy Agenda for a New Administration.”

The book outlines a new vision for communications policy in America and the practical steps needed to achieve it. The book of recommendations, published by Lexington Books and launched on Jan. 26, 2009, at the New America Foundation, was funded by the Media Democracy Fund.

AMERICA’S FORGOTTEN CHALLENGE – UNIVERSAL AND RURAL ACCESS
A future universal service policy can help prepare the United States for the competitive challenges that lay ahead. A special challenge lies with regard to access in rural regions, in which roughly 17 percent of the U.S. population lives.  Now that President Obama’s priorities include expanding broadband throughout the country, we need to insure that all Americans have access not only to high speed networks but also to the expertise to use new technologies.

UNIVERSAL BROADBAND – MORE THAN ACCESS
An alternative vision of universal service and its contribution to rural populations must focus on cultivating the ability of people to improve their lives—with the types of improvements to be determined by the people themselves.  Current data show that only 39% of rural households have high speed Internet, that 20 million Americans do not have access to a single high speed Internet provider, and that many others simply cannot afford it.  A renewed focus on self-determination in the communications/telecommunications environment is essential, and this is more viable with the onset of social networks and new types of telecommunications services. Public policies that acknowledge not just rural parity with urban regions, but also self-determination, could make telecommunications more meaningful to life in rural regions.
New ways to use network capabilities for improved safety, health and education services, and business opportunities should be part of a national telecommunications policy.

UNIVERSAL SERVICE POLICIES
The current universal service program delivers subsidies to telecommunications providers to help cover the higher costs endemic to serving rural regions, and, through its E-rate program, it helps schools and libraries and rural medical facilities maintain Internet services.  However, it is hindered by outdated bases for collecting and distributing revenues, and it has not worked effectively to encourage the benefits competition can bring.
While universal service requires reform, the core principles driving investment in a broadband infrastructure include:

  • Be technology neutral: Use whichever technologies are (or become) appropriate (e.g. fixed line, wireless, WiMax, cable, fiber or other means);
  • Foster competition by supporting a variety of service providers; reverse auctions or competitive subsidy bids may be effective in bringing broadband to new territories quickly;
  • Use subsidies and loan guarantees where necessary to create incentives for innovation, efficiency, and consumer choice.
  • Insuring that the expenditure and use of funds for broadband are transparent.

COMPREHENSIVE POLICY FOR RURAL COMMUNITIES
Current universal service program are inadequate to meet the needs of rural America.  Above all, we need to adopt a national broadband policy that is capable of guaranteeing sustained investment in telecommunications infrastructure in all geographic regions.  Implementing the Federal-State Joint Board on Universal Service’s Broadband Infrastructure Fund specifically for unserved areas should be a priority (estimated to cost $15 billion over three years). Our national policy needs to coordinate meaningfully with state policies.

Specific new policy initiatives for redressing rural broadband problems beyond extending the network itself should:

  1. Establish grants for Internet training. The target populations could be not only individual users but also small businesses. Technological literacy is as fundamental as ‘reading’ literacy.  Grants should go to various entities, including NGOs and nonprofits, towns, counties, colleges and local government that are on the front lines of delivering services.
  2. Funds should be used to enhance projects undertaken by communities that are designed to extend their telecommunications capabilities and applications.
  3. Invest in community college-based Internet applications capabilities classes for individuals and small businesses and create incentives for colleges that enroll small business owners, with some outcome-based measure being the trigger for an incentive “subsidy” or payment.
  4. Create “rural leadership academies” that select aspiring or actual rural leaders for training not only in using the Internet but also in running computer education clinics or courses, in the “nuts and bolts” of broadband infrastructure, and in resource sharing across institutions.

THE E-RATE
The e-rate program has been invaluable for our cash-strapped public schools, and for poorer inner city and rural schools, it may be the only way Internet access has been affordable.

  1.  Continue the USF programs for schools, libraries and rural health care (E-Rate) as a permanent component of universal service.
  2.  Continue the following E-Rate policies: Fund connectivity and related facilities; maintain discounts based on poverty and rurality; Maintain competitive bidding process for vendors.
  3.  Keep responsibility in the FCC, but establish advisory committees with members from other government agencies, professional organizations, and consumer groups.
  4.  Require a triennial review of FCC and USAC procedures to improve efficiency,    effectiveness and transparency of funds disbursement.
  5.  Require a small percentage of E-Rate funds be used for outreach to increase awareness of the programs and for evaluation to monitor program utilization and assess impacts of USF support.

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS
There is negligible cost to the streamlining of universal service policies. However, adopting a comprehensive policy promoting smart networks with access in rural communities may require up to millions of dollars in staged investments.  One estimate, for example, recommends the country spend $44 billion in 2009 alone on broadband initiatives.  In the long term, this investment will bring increased economic opportunities.

FOR MORE INFORMATION
Benton Foundation has many resources addressing broadband
Rural Policy Institute for comprehensive rural policy background and information
Free Press 

CONTACT

  • Rural Broadband: Sharon Strover, Ph.D., University of Texas (sharon.strover@austin.utexas.edu)
  • Universal Service: Krishna Jayakar, Ph.D. Penn State University (kpj1@psu.edu)
  • E-Rate: Heather E. Hudson, Ph.D., University of San Francisco (hudson@usfca.edu)
  • Municipal broadband: Andrea H. Tapia, Penn State University (atapia@ist.psu.edu)
  • Amit M. Schejter, Ph.D., Group Director, Penn State University (schejter@psu.edu )

Recent Projects

  • Broadband 2021: Report of the Interdisciplinary Workshop on the Development of a National Broadband Research Agenda (View PDF)
  • Small Business and Broadband Working Paper
    "Small Businesses and Broadband: Key Drivers For Economic Recovery"
    Krishna Jayakar, Amit Schejter and Richard Taylor (View PDF)
  • The Rural Conundrum: Intrastate Access Charges In Pennsylvania
    Krishna Jayakar, Amit Schejter and Richard Taylor (View PDF)
  • Beyond Broadband Access: Developing Data-Based Information Policy Strategies
    Edited by Richard D. Taylor and Amit M. Schejter, Fordham University Press (View book info) (on Amazon)
  • Future of American Communications (FACT) Working Group “And Communications for All”
    Edited by Amit M. Schejter, Lexington Books (View book info) (on Amazon)
  • Universal Service Working Group
    The Universal Service Working Group is a collaboration between the Benton Foundation and the Institute for Information Policy.

Leadership

Co-Directors

Co-Directors Emeriti

Affiliated Faculty and Fellows

Affiliated Faculty

Current Doctoral Fellows

Past Doctoral Fellows

About

Mission

The Institue for Information Policy conducts groundbreaking research and innovative programs on the social implications of information technology, with an emphasis on the potential of information technologies for improving democratic discourse, social responsibility and quality of life.

Organizational structure

The IIP is co-housed in the College of Communications and the College of Information Sciences and Technology at Penn State.

Leadership

Since its formation, the IIP has operated with co-directors. The current co-directors are Amit Schejter of the College of Communications/Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Krishna Jayakar of the College of Communications and Carleen Maitland of the College of Information Sciences and Technology. Richard Taylor of the University of Hawaii, Manoa and Jorge Schement of Rutgers University are Co-Directors Emeriti.

Activities

The IIP undertakes both research and programmatic activities (e.g., conferences) aimed at making a direct contribution to society (“public scholarship”) and to advancing the understanding of information technology processes and outcomes.

Funding

The IIP conducts its research and programs through generous support from a variety of sponsors, including the Ford Foundation, Google, The Media Democracy Fund, Verizon and AT&T, among others. Since its formation, the IIP has received approximately $2.31 million in external support, excluding in-kind contributions (see gifts and grants received from 1997 to 2016). 

Operations

The IIP operates on the basis of teams of faculty and others as appropriate to implement particular projects. As a research center co-housed in the College of Communications and the College of Information Sciences and Technology, the IIP is also assigned graduate student assistants from both colleges for its activities. A graduate student currently serves as the Managing Editor of the Journal of Information Policy, published by the IIP. The IIP has regularly employed graduate students (and often undergraduates), mostly during the summer, and on occasion during the school year.. 

Program Partners

Launched in 2005, the Pennsylvania Newspaper Journalists Oral History Program is a joint project of Penn State University's Department of Journalism and the Pennsylvania Newspaper Foundation.

The Department of Journalism is one of four departments in College of Communications, one of the largest accredited mass communications program in the country. The department provides instruction in digital, broadcast, visual and multimedia journalism to students interested in careers as reporters, editors, producers and photographers. The department has 20 full-time faculty and annually enrolls about 600 students. In addition to teaching, faculty members are engaged in various research, professional, and outreach activities. 

The Pennsylvania NewsMedia Foundation is an independent, non-profit corporation whose goals are to provide Pennsylvania NewsMedia Association members with training and resources, to develop the next generation of readers and journalists, and to educate the public about the role of a free press. The Pennsylvania NewsMedia Association's mission is to advance the interests of Pennsylvania newspapers, promote the importance of a free and independent press, and provide a forum for critical and innovative thinking about the future of journalism and the newspaper industry. 

About the Program

Lancaster newsroomThe purpose of the Pennsylvania Newspaper Journalists Oral History Program is to record the life histories of leading reporters, editors, publishers, photographers and cartoonists from across the Commonwealth.

The subjects interviewed for the program are selected by the Penn State Department of Journalism in consultation with the Pennsylvania NewsMedia Foundation.  All the individuals interviewed spent a significant part or all of their careers working at Pennsylvania newspapers.

All interviews are recorded and the recordings transcribed.  Scholars, journalists, students and others interested in using the transcribed interviews are asked to contact Ford Risley, program coordinator. 

Credit must be given to the Pennsylvania Newspaper Journalists Oral History Program in any work that uses the interviews. Contact Risley for information about using the original tape recordings.

Ford Risley
jfr4@psu.edu
814-865-2181

Thanks for Your Submission

Thank you for submitting your research abstract.

MERL Checkout

WebcheckoutGo to Web Checkout

 

UP-COMM - Media Effects Lab - Equipment and Room Reservation


First time user? Click the video above for a tutorial.


To better serve the Media Effects Research Lab (MERL) members, a new lab facility checkout system is implemented for lab reservation and equipment checkout. The system will allow users to directly view the availability of lab room and equipment, and make reservations on their own.

This system is only accessible to the authorized MERL members, you will be able to reserve/check out the following recourses for research purpose:

* All the desktop PCs are located in room 309. Reserving room 309 is required in order to use the desktop PCs

To ensure each member has equal accessibility to all the MERL resources, please follow the following checkout policy during your use of lab equipment.

  1. Absolutely no lab equipment can be taken off of lab premises without making an online reservation.
  2. Please note that you SHOULD NOT check out the lab equipment yourself without the presence of the lab coordinator or authorized personnel (not applicable to lab room reservation).
  3. On the online reservation website, you should indicate the equipment you intend to use and how long you will be using them.
  4. Once you make your reservation, the lab coordinator will contact with you to schedule a time for you to pick up your reserved equipment (This is not applicable for lab room reservation). Therefore, all the reservations must be made at least 2 days, but not more than 30 days, before the day you retrieve the equipment so that the lab coordinator can fully prepare everything you need.
  5. Once an item is checked out, the user needs to take a full responsibility of taking care of the item until return the item to the lab. Users are required to return the items by the end of the reservations.
  6. If you need to extend your checkout, you can renew your items anytime before the return deadline.
  7. Most of the time, you will be able to pick up and/or return equipment to the lab coordinator from 9am to 5pm, Monday through Friday. You can also return your equipment by using the drop-off cabinet in room 309 if the lab coordinator is not available. 
  8. To use a drop off cabinet, find an available drawer and store your equipment with a label indicating your name. Remember to use a provided lock to lock the drawer to protect your return. The lab coordinator will retrieve your returned equipment later.
  9. The researcher(s) who made the online reservation is (are) responsible for any damage to the equipment and will be expected to pay for repairs undertaken to restore the equipment to original working condition.

If you agree to this policy and would like to make a reservation, please click the link below to access our online checkout system. You will leave the Media Effects Research Lab website.

Resources

Media Effects Books

Click on book covers for more information about each book.

Book Cover of Media Effects - Advances in Theory and Research
Book Cover of Media Effects Research
Book Cover of Media Processes and Effects
Book Cover of A Cognitive Psychology of Mass Communications
Book Cover of Advertising Theory
Sundar
MBO

Psychophysiology Books

Click on book covers for more information about each book.

Book Cover of Handbook of Psychophysiology
Book Cover of Psychophysiology - Human Behavior and Physiological Response
Book Cover of Psychophysiology Recording

Relevant Journals

Journal of Communication Cover
Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication Cover
Journal of Media Psychology Cover
Psychophysiology Journal Cover

Media and Psychophysiology Labs

National and International Media and Communication Organizations

Other Resources

Teaching

An important mission of the Media Effects Research Laboratory is to serve as a training ground for young media effects researchers. As part of its teaching mission, the lab offers hands-on experience with the practical aspects of conducting laboratory experiments to undergraduate as well as graduate students. Students enrolled in Penn State classes on media effects and research methods use the lab for conducting their class assignments on observation and measurement techniques as well as for performing their end-semester group projects.

For syllabi of current courses which make use of the lab, click any of the course links below:

Undergraduate Courses

COMM 118 Introduction to Media Effects
COMM 418 Media Effects
COMM 420 Research Methods in Advertising and Public Relations
COMM 413W Mass Media and the Public

Graduate Courses

COMM 517 Psychological Aspects of Communication Technology
COMM 518 Media Effects
COMM 597C Video Game Effects
COMM 506 Introduction to Mass Communications Research
COMM 516 Quantitative Data Analysis
COMM 597B Advanced Data Analysis

Undergraduate Grant

Since 2005 we have been able to train select undergraduate media effects students in collecting psychophysiological data thanks to the President's Fund for promoting theory-based undergraduate research. Students who apply and are selected typically meet with lab coordinators once per week throughout spring semester to learn the various methods and even collect some data from participants.

This is a great opportunity for those interested in media effects research, and especially those considering graduate school in the field. Psychophysiological measures are being looked to more in the research field, especially as technology advances, so experience in collecting and analyzing a variety of psychophysiological data is a strong selling point for any media effects student.

People

Student Researchers

Jose Aviles

Jose earned his bachelor of arts in psychology at Bard College. Following completion of his bachelor’s degree, he spent two years working as a research assistant at Yale University for the Yale-Bridgeport GEAR UP (Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs) partnership. In 2013, he completed his master’s degree in communication at the College of Charleston.

While at Penn State, Jose has continued to explore media effects, positive uses of video games, virtual embodiment, group interaction, and stereotypes and prejudice. His dissertation will focus on exposure to and interactions with raced avatars to examine their influence on real-world racial attitudes. Jose currently teaches Gender, Diversity, and the Media and is interested in teaching classes in the area of media effects, research methods, and intergroup communication.

Eugene Cho

While research projects during her master's training centered on socio-psychological effects of using social media, Eugene’s academic interests are also widely open to various forms of media effects caused by digital media usage.

Pratiti Diddi

Her research interests focus on understanding the psychological effects and cognitive processing implications of media messages in improving public health.

Sara Erlichman

Her research interests focus on how and why individuals develop parasocial relationships, and how it can be used for prosocial causes.

Arienne Ferchaud

Her research interests include new media entertainment, tackling phenomena including relationships in user-generated content, binge watching, and a continued focus on entertainment narratives.

Andrew Gambino

His research is situated in the fields of communication and technology, human-computer interaction, and computer-mediated communication. Specifically, he is interested in the relationships people form with their devices.

Jin Kang

Her research interest is in self-representation in virtual environments. She would like to examine how a user’s interaction with virtual avatar may affect their offline cognition, behavior, and affect.

Jinyoung Kim

Her research interests include persuasive effect of online media (e.g., web sites, social media) on informing the public of accurate health-related information and on changing people’s risky health behaviors (e.g., smoking, obesity).

Sushma Kumble

She is interested in studying the interactions of message features and positive emotions, and their impact on attitudes (both implicit and explicit) and behavior in health and prosocial behavior contexts

Bingjie Liu

Her research interests are the effects of new technologies on human psychology, such as psychological well-being, cognition and attribution processes in the context of social media, etc.

Maria Molina Davila

Her research interests include the acculturation process of international students as well as on selective exposure and mediated communication, and media effects on immigration.

Jinping Wang

Her research interests include the effects of web-based communication and studying users’ engagement in online expression, discussion and other forms of interactive activities

Anli Xiao

Her interests include how social media and applications mediate public relations outcomes for such groups; to see how social media and applications affect the legitimacy and efficacy of these organizations’ initiatives, and more.

 

Penn State Alumni Associated with Media effects research lab

 

Erin Ash

Assistant professor at Clemson University, Clemson, SC.

Erica Bailey

Assistant professor at Angelo State University, San Angelo, TX.

Saraswathi Bellur

Assistant professor at University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT

Bimal Balakrishnan

Associate professor at University of Missouri, Columbia, MI.

Tayo Banjo

Associate professor at University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH.

Corina Constantin

Vice president of Media Analytics, PHD, in New York, NY.

Yuki Dou

Associate professor at Ritsumeikan University, Kyoto, Japan.

Edward Downs

Assistant professor at University of Minnesota Duluth, Duluth, MN.

Eun Go

Assistant professor at Western Illinois University, Macomb, IL.

Nokon Heo

Assistant professor at University of Central Arkansas, Conway, AR.

Jennifer Hoewe

Assistant professor at University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL.

Yifeng Hu

Associate professor at The College of New Jersey, Ewing, NJ.

Yan Huang

Assistant professor at Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX.

Haiyan Jia

Assistant professor at Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA.

Eun Hwa Jung

Assistant professor, National University of Singapore, Singapore.

Sriram Kalyanaraman

Professor at University of Florida, Gainesville, FL. 

Hyunjin Kang

Assistant professor at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

Guan-Soon Khoo

Assistant professor at Roanoke College, Salem, Virginia.

Jinhee Kim

Assistant professor at Cleveland State University, Cleveland, OH.

Youjeong Kim

Associate professor at New York Institute of Technology, New York.

Hyang-Sook Kim

Assistant professor at Towson Universoty, Towson, MD.

Keunyeong (Karina) Kim

Assistant professor at Californa State University Dominguez Hills, CA.

Yoon-Jeon Koh

Vice president of Product Business Unit, Telecom & Convergence Business Group, KT in Seoul, Republic of Korea.

Maja Krakowiak

Associate professor at University of Colorado, Colorado Springs, CO.

Sang Yeal Lee

Associate professor & Strategic Communications Program Coordinator at West Virginia University, Morgantown, WVA.

Sangki Lee

Associate professor at Arkansas Tech University, Russellville, Arkansas.

Ruobing Li

Assistant professor at Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA.

Anthony M. Limperos

Assistant professor in the Division of Instructional Communication & Research at the University of Kentucky.

Sampada Marathe

Senior user researcher, Ericsson, Inc., Lowell, MA.

John McGrath.

Associate professor at University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown, PA.

Anne Oeldorf-Hirsch

Assistant professor at University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT.

Jeeyun Oh

Assistant professor at University of Texas, Austin, TX.

Srividya Ramasubramanian

Associate professor at Texas A&M University, College Station, TX.

Meghan Sanders

Associate professor at Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA.

Marc Seamon

Assistant professor at Youngstown State University, Youngstown, OH.

Drew Shade

Assistant professor at University of Cincinnati Blue Ash, Blue Ash, OH.

Brett Sherrick

Assistant professor at University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL.

Carmen Stavrositu

Associate professor at University of Colorado, Colorado Springs, CO.

Mina Tsay-Vogel

Assistant professor at Boston University, Boston, MA.

Michail Vafeiadis

Assistant professor at Auburn University, Auburn, AL.

Thomas Franklin Waddell

Assistant professor at University of Florida, Gainesville, FL.

Ruoxu Wang

Assistant professor at University of Memphis, Memphis, TN.

Mu Wu

Assistant professor at California State University, LA, CA.

Julia Woolley

Assistant professor of Communication Studies at California Polytechnic State University.

Qian Xu

Associate professor at Elon University, Elon, NC.

Chun Yang

Assistant professor at Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA.

Bo Zhang

User experience researcher, Facebook, Inc., Menlo Park, CA.

Facility

About the Facility

The Media Effects Research Laboratory housed in the Donald P. Bellisario College of Communications is a facility dedicated to conducting empirical research on the psychological effects of communication technologies and media psychology. Several experimental studies involving hundreds of subjects have been conducted in the lab since its opening in 1997. Experiments have been executed by faculty as well as undergraduate and graduate students taking classes in media effects, psychological aspects of communication technologies, and introduction to communication research method.

Experiments with television and computers in the Traditional Wing have tested the effects of structural features such as modality, and psychological outcomes of various content. More recently, research in this lab has also tested various psychological effects of video game play. Experiments in the New Media Wing have involved studying the effects of animation on websites, loading time of websites on subjects' attention, arousal, memory, content perception, effects of content on stimulation of stereotypical thoughts, emotional and cognitive responses to media entertainment, media violence, reality-based television programs, gender and media, and media portrayals of racial groups and the effects of such portrayals on viewers' racial attitudes.

In addition to providing a physical space for conducting controlled experiments, the Media Effects Research Laboratory acts as a resource facility for researchers conducting experiments and surveys in all aspects of media effects. The lab also serves as an impetus for effects researchers to collaborate and share results and ideas. The lab helps prepare and pretest stimuli, and its personnel offer assistance in designing experiments and questionnaires.

Traditional Wing

The Traditional Wing is comprised of an Experimental Room, an Observation Room and a Waiting Area. The Observation Room contains audio/visual equipment (VCR, DVD player, laserdisc player) and a Mac computer for analysis. The A/V equipment is connected to a surround-sound speaker system and an overhead projection system which displays stimuli on a nine-foot screen in the Experimental Room. The Observation Room can accommodate two observers and allow for unobtrusive observation through a two-way mirror.

The Experimental Room features a 46-inch, flat-panel LCD television, DVD player and the following video game consoles: Nintendo Wii, XBOX 360, Playstation 2, Nintendo Gamecube, PSP, and Nintendo DS. This room is often used to collect questionnaire data following experiments in which the participant is exposed to e to film, tv, or advertising clips, or engages in video game play. The space can seat up to 12 viewers for the main screen, comfortably accommodate two video game players, and psychophysiological data can be collected simultaneously from four participants at a time.

New Media Wing

This wing is home to 18 computers equipped with reaction time software. Experimenters use this space to gather cognitive and behavioral measures in reaction to interacting with websites or other media online. Researchers can also examine unconscious or implicit attitudes through the use of reaction time tests. As with the traditional media lab, psychophysiological measures can be collected in this lab for up of 8 participants at one time.

Psychophysiology

The media lab is equipped with the Biopac system for collecting a wide variety of cardiac, brain, muscular, and ocular data. The most common measurements used in the lab are heart rate, galvanic skin response (or skin conductance), facial electromyography (EMG), electrooculography (EOG), and electroencephalography (EEG).

ICT4D Resources

Journals

Conferences

Grants

  1. International Development Research Centre, Canada

    Contact: Ms. Isabella Mugo, Project Coordinator, University of Nairobi

  2. The Swedish Program for ICTs in Developing Regions - Spider Grant

    Contact: Stockholm University

  3. Microsoft Research Foundations

    Contact: Dr. Jonathan Donner

  4. LirneAsia

    Contact: Dr. Rohan Samarajiva, CEO of LirneAsia

  5. Infodev, World Bank

    Contact: Dr. Tim Kelly

  6. UNESCO - UNITWIN Grant

    Contact: Dr. Tim Unwin

  7. Nokia Research Centre
  8. The Center for Rural Pennsylvania
  9. The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation - Grand Challenges in Global Health Grant

Links

  1. Michigan State University ICTs + ICT4D

    Professor involved : Dr. Charles Steinfield, Dr. Mark Levy, Dr. Jennifer Olson, Dr. Kurt Demaagd

  2. University of Colorado-Boulder Atlas Institute

    Professor involved : Dr. Revi Sterling

  3. Royal Holloway-University of London ICT4D

    Professor involved : Dr. Tim Unwin

  4. University of California-Berkley ICTD

    Professor involved : Dr. Jenna Burrell, Dr. John Chung, Dr. Tapan Parikh, Dr. AnnaLee Saxenian

  5. University of Southern California Institute for Creative Technologies
  6. Illinois Institute of Technologies

    Professor involved : Dr. Laura Hossman

  7. University of Manchester Institute of Development Policy and Management

    Professor involved : Dr. Richard Heeks

  8. The ICT University
  9. The International Network for Post Graduate Students in the area of ICT4D

    Professor involved : Grad student forum

  10. The University of Washington CHANGE

Speaker Series

Dr. Tim Brown, Carnegie Mellon University 

Dr. S. Revi Sterling, USAID

Current Projects

  • Local Economic Impacts of Investments in Community Technology Centers: An Empirical Investigation (Dr. Krishna Jayakar & Jenna Grzeslo)
    Project Description: Community technology centers (CTCs) have a long pedigree, both in the United States and abroad. Historically, their motivation was to extend information and communication technology (ICT) access and training services to communities and individuals deprived of such services because of low socioeconomic status or lack of digital literacy. Although community technology centers (CTCs) provide a host of services that may have economic consequences, few studies have attempted to empirically assess the impact of CTCs on local communities. Controlling for broadband availability and demographics, this study found that there is a small but positive and significant impact of CTC quality on median household income, at the county level. In addition to bridging the digital divide for disadvantaged populations, our research shows that there are also quantifiable economic benefits from CTC investments.
  • Is IT Enough? Evidence From a Natural Experiment in India's Agriculture Markets (Dr. Chris Parker)
    Project Description: Access to information and communication technologies (ICTs) such as mobile phone networks is widely known to improve market efficiency. In this paper, we examine whether access to timely and accurate information provided through ICT applications has any additional impact. Using a detailed dataset from Reuters Market Light (RML), a text message service in India that provides daily price information to farmers, we find that this information reduces geographic price dispersion of crops in rural communities by as much as 5.2% (std. error 2.6%, p-value 4.5%), over and above access to mobile phone technology and other means of communication. To identify the effect of information on price dispersion we exploit a natural experiment where bulk text messages were banned unexpectedly across India for twelve days in 2010. We find that access to RML information has the highest impact in areas where RML has the largest number of subscribers. Also, the effect is largest for perishable crops. RML thus reduces the higher risk associated with high value perishable crops. We discuss implications for development organizations and for information providers.
  • Information Flow Empowers Vegetable Supply Chain in Chengdu (Dr. Bu Zhong)
    Project Description: This ICT4D project introduces the optimization of information flows in local vegetable supply chain as a strategic tool for agricultural development, especially vegetable production, in Chengdu, China. The vegetable supply has been a challenge to Chengdu, China’s fourth largest city where 14 million people live. After analyzing the current information flows in the vegetable supply chain, an information hub is proposed to build up in Chengdu, providing information to local vegetable farmers and vendors such as sales data, inventory level, order status, sales forecast, production and delivery schedule. The date from the information hub should facilitate vegetable farmers and vendors to make SWOT analyses (evaluating the Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats). The information hub should assist them in identifying new information needs, which are not anticipated currently, such as information for forging alliances for collective benefits or monitoring systems for corrective measures. Dr. Zhong joins Dr. David Abler, professor agricultural economy in the College of Agriculture at Penn State to partner in this study.
  • If You Build It, Will They Come? Understanding the Information Needs of Users of BTOP Funded Broadband Internet Public Computer (Dr.Amit Schejter)
    Project Description: As the Internet becomes an integral way by which individuals receive information, participate in civic activities, and conduct economic and social transactions, understanding barriers and opportunities of effective online use for traditionally marginalized communities becomes paramount. Our “Building Digital Bridges” research project in Pittsburgh seeks to aid broadband policy initiatives by revealing how inclusion of local social and cultural capital is integral in enabling effective use of broadband Internet. Graduate student Brandie Martin joins Dr. Schejter in this study. 
  • In Machines We Trust: What Predicts the Success of Electronic Voting Machines in India (Dr. S. Shyam Sundar)
    Project Description: Several underdeveloped nations in Asia and Africa are rapidly embracing information and communication technologies to automate processes, reduce human involvement and improve quality of life. For example, India is moving toward 100% diffusion of information technologies, such as the electronic voting machine, while more developed nations such as the US have not fully adopted them. However, the reverse is true for certain other technologies, such as the national identification number—while most Americans have embraced it, there is considerable opposition to its adoption in India. It appears that Indians mistrust the technology and the uses to which it can be put by the government (https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2012/05/growing-mistrust-india-biometric-id-scheme). While their endorsement of electronic voting machines is premised on a perception of reduced voter fraud and minimal human involvement in the electoral counting process, their misgivings about the national biometric ID scheme rest upon the technology’s potential to allow human misuse of the information. These two examples signal opposite attitudes toward technologies that collect, process and store individual information on a mass scale.

    The goal of our research is to understand such contradictions by investigating the social and psychological factors underlying trust in information and communication technologies (ICTs) in the development context, with a specific focus on the theoretical mechanisms that predict trust in electronic voting machines and mistrust in unique identity cards. Drawing on MAIN Model, Technology Acceptance Model, Diffusion of Innovations Model and related theories from psychology (e.g., halo effect) and human-computer interaction (e.g., captology), this project seeks to identify key technological features, social factors and user attributes that predict trust in ICTs, using survey and field-experimental methods. In addition to advancing theory and knowledge about user perceptions of ICTs, our findings are expected to have practical implications for the design and deployment of ICTs on a large scale. The PI is S. Shyam Sundar, with Akshaya Sreenivasan serving as graduate researcher and Jianghanhan Li as undergraduate researcher.
  • Crisis in Nigeria's Secondary Education as Communications Break Down (Dr. Anthony Olorunnisola)

Areas of Focus

Development Informatics

Information policy discourse has traditionally been inundated by numbers and metrics, which purportedly describe the "information society" and reflect national levels of such things as "E-readiness" and the "digital divide." Most approaches involving quantitative "indicators" produce results, which are primarily descriptive and comparative and the mere calculation of penetration levels provides information that ultimately directs policies, which are solely focused on increasing access. But in today's multimodal multimedia ICT environment, what is their value? Looking ahead, are they the numbers that matter? For the future, can we find numbers that would make a difference to development goals? A serious assessment of "development informatics" should quantitatively and qualitatively assess the information universe at ICT4D project sites--before, during, and after a given project is implemented. Across projects, we will be able to develop theoretically meaningful indicators of both need for ICTs critical for development and success of ICT4D projects. In the long run, this will help us do development work with more focus on critical indicators of need and success.

Social Media and Empowerment

Areas of social media and (dis)empowerment research inquiries include investigating the relationships between multiple strata of society and social media; the ability for new information and communication technologies (ICTs) to serve as a platform for empowerment or disempowerment. Social media offer a potential platform from which a greater spectrum of society can participate in activities in sectors that include: education, agriculture, commerce, social services, social movement organizations, non-governmental organizations and in shaping public policy. As adoption of new ICTs increase, foregoing areas of engagement provide opportunity for researchers to critically assess the interrelationships between technologies and society. Investigations can include taking stock of diverse uses and engagement as well as factors associated with the political economy of social media (digital divide, regulation of social media, and commoditization of surveillance).

Trustworthy ICTs

If we assume that ICT deployment and adoption are important for development, individual and societal acceptance of ICT systems is essential. Understanding the decision making processes that go into development programs, and perceptions of them (along with perceptions of the corporations and the countries they represent) could help develop better and more productive partnerships between providers and recipients of ICT4D projects. Unlike previous generations of ICTs that were conveyors of information, modern ICTs have the additional capability to collect and store user information and often interact with them. If in the "Old ICT" world people communicating over media needed to trust only each other, "new ICTs" themselves pose a risk to their users as a result of the personal information they store. This research stream will investigate how ICTs become trustworthy in the development context, what kinds of cultural, societal, psychological, economic, policy and usability factors influence the formation of trust in the machine at all levels (from individual farmers adopting ATMs to countries adopting electronic voting machines), how trust influences development initiatives, and how can trust be designed into systems and programs (e.g., corporate social responsibility) for better achieving development objectives.

ICT Use for Formal and Non-Formal Education

The Consortium believes in the transformational potential of education in people's lives, and the potential of information and communication technologies to aid educational strategies which seek to produce real, collaborative solutions. Motivated by this belief, we will conduct research and outreach on the educational applications of ICTs, both in the formal and informal sectors. Our research will address topics such as ICT access in the classroom, the development and evaluation of educational technology applications and related pedagogical initiatives, digital literacy among both traditional and non-traditional student populations, and ICT applications in non-formal and continuing education. Through our outreach efforts, we seek to communicate the findings of our research to non-governmental organizations, community groups, and governments at all levels as a means for further stimulating the efficacy and humanitarian intent of our research outcomes.

Scholarly Citations

The research of the Pennsylvania Center for the First Amendment has been cited in the following scholarly publications:

  • Albany Law Review
  • American University Journal of Gender, Social Policy & the Law
  • American University Law Review
  • Arizona Law Review
  • Arizona State Law Journal
  • Boston College Law Review
  • Boston University Law Review
  • Brandeis Law Journal
  • Brigham Young University Law Review
  • Brooklyn Law Review
  • California Law Review
  • California Western Law Review
  • Capital University Law Review
  • Cardozo Arts & Entertainment Law Journal
  • Cardozo Law Review
  • Cato Supreme Court Review
  • Chicago-Kent Law Review
  • Columbia Human Rights Law Review
  • Columbia Journal of Law and Social Problems
  • CommLaw Conspectus
  • Communications Law & Policy
  • Connecticut Law Review
  • Denver University Law Review
  • Duke Law Journal
  • Federal Communications Law Journal
  • First Amendment Law Review
  • Fordham Intellectual Property, Media and Entertainment Law Journal
  • Georgetown Journal of Gender & the Law
  • Georgetown Journal of Law & Public Policy
  • Georgia Law Review
  • Georgia State University Law Review
  • Harvard Law Review
  • Hastings Communications and Entertainment Law Journal
  • Hastings Constitutional Law Quarterly
  • Hofstra Law Review
  • Houston Law Review
  • Indiana Law Journal
  • Iowa Law Review
  • Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology
  • Journal of Law and Policy
  • Journal of Legislation
  • Journal of National Security Law & Policy
  • Journal of Transnational Law & Policy
  • Journal of Technology Law & Policy
  • Kansas Law Review
  • Law and Contemporary Problems
  • Law and History Review
  • Law and Psychology Review
  • Lewis & Clark Law Review
  • Loyola Law Review
  • Loyola University Chicago Law Review
  • Loyola of Los Angeles Entertainment Law Review
  • Maine Law Review
  • Maryland Law Review
  • McGeorge Law Review
  • Michigan State Law Review
  • Minnesota Law Review
  • Mississippi Law Review
  • Missouri Law Review
  • New York City Law Review
  • New York Law School Law Review
  • New York University Law Review
  • North Dakota Law Review
  • Northern Kentucky University Law Review
  • Northern Illinois Law Review
  • Northwestern University Law Review
  • Notre Dame Journal of Ethics, Law & Public Policy
  • Notre Dame Law Review
  • Ohio State Law Journal
  • Oregon Law Review
  • Pace Law Review
  • Penn State Law Review
  • Pepperdine Law Review
  • Pierce Law Review
  • Rutgers Computer & Technology Law Journal
  • Rutgers Law Journal
  • San Diego Law Review
  • Seattle University Law Review
  • South Carolina Law Review
  • South Dakota Law Review
  • Southern California Law Review
  • Southern Illinois University Law Journal
  • Southwestern Law Review
  • St. John's Journal of Legal Commentary
  • St. John's Law Review
  • St. Louis University Public Law Review
  • St. Thomas Law Review
  • Stanford Law & Policy Review
  • Syracuse Law Review
  • Texas Review of Entertainment & Sports Law
  • Touro Law Review
  • University of California Davis Law Review
  • UCLA Entertainment Law Review
  • UCLA Law Review
  • University of Cincinnati Law Review
  • University of Illinois Law Review
  • University of Miami Law Review
  • University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform
  • University of Pennsylvania Law Review
  • University of Pittsburgh Law Review
  • Valparaiso University Law Review
  • Vermont Law Review
  • Villanova Law Review
  • Villanova Sports & Entertainment Law Journal
  • Virginia Sports & Entertainment Law Journal
  • Washington & Lee Law Review
  • West Virginia Law Review
  • Whittier Law Review
  • William and Mary Bill of Rights Journal
  • William and Mary Journal of Women and the Law
  • Wisconsin Law Review
  • Wyoming Law Review
  • Yale Journal of International Law Yale Journal on Regulation
  • Yale Law Journal

Pennsylvania Center for the First Amendment

Pennsylvania Center for the First Amendment Logo

A leading national research center about the First Amendment housed in the Donald P. Bellisario College of Communications.

For more than 15 years, the Pennsylvania Center for the First Amendment has been a leader in education, research and outreach concerning the fundamental rights of free expression and free press in the United States. Founded in 1992, the Center has continuously provided educational programs, sponsored speakers, published books and articles in the popular and academic press, and served as a media resource on a wide array of First Amendment topics.

Expert Testimony, Commentary

The work product of the Center has been cited to Congress, state legislatures and the United States Supreme Court. By providing expert testimony to legislative bodies and the courts and expert commentary to the regional and national media, the Center’s co-directors regularly represent the Center to the public and extend its reach beyond the academic environment. This notion of public scholarship – disseminating research to a wide audience where it is both applicable and influential – lies at the core of the Center’s mission.

  • Adult Entertainment Law
  • Commercial Speech
  • Free Speech in Public Schools
  • Freedom of Information Act
  • Freedom of the Press
  • Higher Education Speech Cases
  • Privacy, Cell Phones and YouTube
  • Protests and Demonstration
  • Reality Television
  • SLAPP Suits
  • Violent Video Game Laws

Publications and Recent Research

Publications by the Center’s members include three books, more than 75 law review articles and more than 100 op-ed pieces in some of the nation’s leading newspapers. These works are regularly cited in both academic and popular publications.

Contact

 

Davis Program Lectures & Symposia

About Don Davis Sr.

Don Davis Sr.For 40 of his 62 years, Donald W. Davis dedicated his life to advertising. Over the years, he presented his philosophy of advertising to thousands of professionals and students.

Davis (1986-1959) began his career as an advertising manager for a conglomerate of newspapers in Springfield, Mass., in 1919. Early on, he expressed concerns about cigarette and alcohol advertisements that could be considered harmful. Davis was able to persuade the Springfield newspapers’ publisher to refuse advertising dollars from the cigarette and alcohol manufacturers, setting a precedent in the newspaper and advertising industries.

Among his many professional affiliations, Donald Davis served as vice president of the Advertising Federation of America (AFA) during the 1920s and as national president of Alpha Delta Sigma from 1947 to 1949. He was a member of the Board of Directors of the New England Newspaper Advertising Executives Association from 1935 to 1936, and the Board of Directors of the AFA in 1948.

Davis will be most remembered for his 37 years of teaching, predominantly at Penn State. In 1936, he was invited to establish a curriculum in advertising at the University, and under his leadership, enrollment in advertising courses grew to be the largest in the country.

About Don Davis Jr.

Don Davis Jr.Donald W. Davis Jr., a Penn State alumnus and the retired chairman and CEO of Stanley Works who died in 2010, spent his life emphasizing “doing the right thing.” That concept guided Davis during his years at Stanley Works, one of the largest international manufacturers of builders’ hardware and tools. Under his leadership, Stanley grew to a “Fortune 200” company. In addition, for 16 years, Davis taught courses in ethics and leadership at Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Establishing an endowed professorship in ethics was one of a series of gifts to the College of Communications by Don Davis, who graduated in 1942 with a degree in journalism and in 1972 was named a Distinguished Alumnus of Penn State -- the highest honor the University bestows upon its alumni. The award salutes the achievements of outstanding alumni whose “personal lives, professional achievements and community service exemplify the objectives of their Alma Mater.”

Davis previously endowed the College’s student chapter of the American Advertising Federation, the Donald W. Davis Mass Communications Fund, the Davis Symposium in Advertising Ethics and a Trustee Scholarship in the name of his sister, Maralyn Davis Mazza. He also provided funds to establish the Donald W. Davis Advertising Lab.

“Establishment of the professorship in ethics is the result of the convergence of a number of factors,” said Davis, who cited his father’s legacy of emphasizing ethics and his own teaching experience. He also noted the commitment of the adminstration and faculty of the College, across all departments, to maintaining a high ethical standard.

“There has been an increased interest and attention of society generally concerning ethical behavior, resulting from the excesses of the dot-com revolution, recent corporate scandals and excessive executive compensation,” Davis said. “Ethical dilemmas exist every day for communicators, from the always present tensions between news and partisan opinion to the conflict between a communicator’s own sense of social responsibility and the motivation for commercial success.”

About

The Don Davis Program in Ethical Leadership was founded in 2005 through the generous support of Don Davis Jr., a 1942 graduate of Penn State and the retired chairman and CEO of Stanley Works. His father, Donald W. Davis Sr., founded the advertising program at Penn State in 1936. The program was created in order to establish an across-the-curriculum program in ethics for the College of Communications and to provide the resources necessary to support the College’s focus on social responsibility.

Specific weeks will be designated each semester during which all departments in the College will place particular emphasis on ethics and social responsibility. Contemporary case studies will be created each year that will be constructed around the way a media outlet, agency or company handled a thorny ethical issue. The Davis Professor in Ethics, in consultation with others, will be responsible for selecting and devising case studies for each of the four departments in the College.

The concentrated and coordinated weeks emphasizing ethics will bring to campus major players from the companies, agencies or outlets that found themselves entangled in the challenging issues. The weeks also will involve systematically designed readings and simulations to prepare students for the critical thinking that must go into resolving complex situations.

Ethics and the College of Communications

The College of Communication has a long history of emphasizing the importance of ethics and social responsibility through both its curriculum and practice. It has two has endowed lecture series on the topic: the Donald W. Davis Symposium in Advertising Ethics and the N. N. Oweida Lecture in Journalism Ethics.

In 2004, the College also launched the Arthur W. Page Center for Integrity in Public Communication, whose research and programming centerpiece is ethics and responsibility. In addition, Jimirro Center for the Study of Media Influence, established in 2002 and housed in the College, devotes time and resources to the study of ethics, fairness and balance.

A course in media ethics is required of all journalism majors. In addition, questions of ethics, fairness, responsibility, credibility and good citizenship are woven into the fabric of the majority of courses throughout the entire College curriculum.

Davis Awards

The Davis Award recognizes College of Communications students who distinguish themselves in the classroom, and in their activities around campus and in the community. Faculty members nominate students who have displayed an above-and-beyond commitment to service and integrity, and who deserved to be recognized as ethical leaders or role for the next generation.

Recent honorees:

  • 2014 -- Four students honored. STORY
  • 2012 -- Six students honores. STORY

Resources and Links

Penn State Ethics Programs

  • The Rock Ethics Institute
    The mission of the Rock Ethics Institute is to promote ethical awareness and inquiry in the University and in the public and professional sectors by supporting curricular innovations designed to improve moral literacy across the University curriculum, building collaborative research projects around ethically based initiatives, and encouraging public dialogue on ethical issues.
  • The Arthur W. Page Center
    The Page Center is a research center dedicated to the study and advancement of ethics and responsibility in corporate communication and other forms of public communication.

University Ethics Centers

  • University of San Diego Ethics Update
    An excellent resource—arguably the best out there—geared for students and ethics instructors, alike. Includes pages on ethical theory, case-based social issues (i.e. controversial issues—abortion, race, animal rights, etc.), and an excellent resource section including case studies, classic texts in ethics, videos and books, and other resources.
  • The Center for Business Ethics at Bentley University
    The mission of the Center for Business Ethics is to give leadership in the creation of organizational cultures that align effective business performance with ethical business conduct. It endeavors to do so by the application of expertise, research, education and a collaborative approach to disseminating best practices.
  • University of Montana Center for Ethics
    The Center for Ethics is charged with conducting responsible moral discourse concerning both societal ethics (e.g., the values that inform health, economic growth, education, and conservation policies) and the ethical practices of a wide range of professionals (e.g., public administrators, business managers, health workers, teachers). The Center's functions include ethics inquiry and education (to be achieved through courses, public lectures and conferences, professional development workshops, and a resource center) and funded research.

Professional and Non-profit Ethics Sites

  • The Poynter Institute (Page on Ethics)
    Great resource for journalists and students, all around—everything from decision making to interviewing and how they should be conducted ethically. Includes a regularly published article on journalistic ethics, which is very interesting.
  • The Ethics Resource Center
    Very interesting organization with lots of publications put out by them. Their site has great resources, including an extensive reading list of both books and articles, links to other organizations, and many other resources at http://www.ethics.org/resources/ online.
  • The First Amendment Center
    Has several resources for students, teachers, and researchers on ethics, mostly focused around journalistic ethics related to the First Amendment.
  • Independent Press Councils
    This site contains the largest collection of press codes of conduct in the world. And the site is dedicated to media accountability systems (M*A*S), first among which are press councils. Lists codes of ethics for 370 organizations, mostly in countries other than America.
  • Business Ethics Magazine
    Quarterly magazine dealing with ethical issues in the business world. Ranks 100 best corporate citizens. Looks at scandals and solutions. Social and corporate change through the business world.
  • The Ethics Officer Association
    The Ethics Officer Association is a non-consulting, member-driven association exclusively for individuals who are responsible for their company's ethics, compliance, and business conduct programs.
  • Business Ethics Balance
    Provides business ethics consulting, business ethics training, and speaking engagements on relevant themes. Provides a clearinghouse for business ethics research, and analysis; Business Ethics course development to colleges, universities and schools in the central Pennsylvania area.
  • Public Agenda Online
    Public Agenda is a nonpartisan, nonprofit public opinion research and citizen education organization based in New York City. It was founded in 1975 by social scientist and author Daniel Yankelovich and former Secretary of State Cyrus Vance. The two-fold mission of Public Agenda is to (1) Help leaders better understand the public's point of view on major policy issues and, (2) Help citizens better understand critical policy issues so they can make their own more informed and thoughtful decisions.

Paralympics, 2016

RIO de JANEIRO, Brazil -- For a handful of Penn State College of Communications student journalists, the end of the Rio 2016 Olympics marked the beginning of a new adventure -- covering the Rio Paralympics for The Associated Press.

In early September, nine students from the John Curley Center for Sports Journalism and four members of the faculty, including Dean Marie Hardin, came here to cover the Rio Paralympics, the second-largest international multi-sport event in the world.

Reporter Emily Peacock at workDuring a week on location after their departure from Happy Valley, the students produced numerous articles about the Paralympics that were published by such outlets as The Washington Post, The New York Times and ESPN. Students from Penn State and the University of Georgia partnered with The Associated Press to cover the event.

Fifty-two American reporters traveled to Rio to document the games -- and 13 were from the Curley Center. The Curley Center’s goal? To get hands-on experience covering a large-scale event and to also spread nationwide support for the Paralympic sports.

-- Emily Peacock ('18 Ad/PR)

 

Here are some articles published by the students:

More work by Penn State students: 

Paralympics photographerReporter Garrett Ross

U.S. Open, 2016

U.S. Open wide angle photo

Students conduct interviews at U.S. OpenEach year, hundreds of media members attend and cover the U.S. Open for outlets across the country. In 2016, that contingent included four Penn State students.

Matt Martell, Anna Pitingolo, Mark Puleo and Roger Van Scyoc traveled to Oakmont Country Club near Pittsburgh to report on the championship for the USA TODAY Network through a partnership with the John Curley Center for Sports Journalism, housed in the College of Communications.

One of golf’s four majors, championship play at the tournament was conducted June 16-19. 

“This is such an incredible opportunity," said Pitingolo, a senior journalism major from Berkeley Heights, New Jersey. "It’s something that in a million years, I never thought that as a college student I’d be traveling to a major event like the U.S. Open.”

Pitingolo and the other students wrote about golfers with local ties to media outlets served by the USA TODAY Network. The studnet journalists got up early and got home late, with long days at the course, during the tournament.

In addition to the experience covering such a popular event, the Penn State students were also able to network a bit with other journalists covering the tournament. Many Penn Staters were in that group as well. Among them recent graduate John McGonigal of the Centre Daily Times and veteran golf writer Gerry Dulac of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

“If the event itself hadn’t sold me, that certainly did,” Pitingolo said.

John Affleck, director of the Curley Center and Knight Chair for Sports Journalism and Society at Penn State, supervised the students on site and acted as a liaison with the network’s editors.

“It’s tremendously exciting for us to be able to offer our students this opportunity. We’re very grateful to the USA TODAY Network for this partnership,” he said. “Also, the chance to cover the Open in Pennsylvania and at one of the most challenging courses in American golf just made it that much more special.”

College of Communications alumnus Pete Kowalski was also at the U.S. Open, serving as the director of championship communications for the United States Golf Association. Another alum, PR pro Rob Boulware, served as a member of Kowalski's team of volunteers at the event.

The students work appeared across the country. Here's a sampling:

Super Bowl XLVIII Coverage

Croke Park Classic

Curley Center Ireland studentsBefore, during and after the Croke Park Classic, eight Penn State students comprised a working news bureau coordinated by the John Curley Center for Sports Journalism that served media organizations throughout Pennsylvania by providing coverage of the season-opening college football matchup between Penn State and the University of Central Florida in Ireland.

As part of the agreement with the Pennsylvania NewsMedia Association, the partner news organizations had the first chance to use stories, multimedia materials and photos produced by students each day.

A chronolological look at the students' work follows, along with a Storify compilation of their social media efforts.

Epilogue

From Dublin

Preview Stories

Trip Background

 

Baseball in Cuba

Curley Center students cover historic Penn State trip

Students at work in Cuban press boxEight Penn State students traveled more than 1,250 miles from University Park to spend what would have been be their Thanksgiving break working in Cuba in November 2015. 

The students, members of the John Curley Center for Sports Journalism, followed the Penn State baseball team during its historic trip to Cuba to play three games against Cuban National Series teams. The communications students left campus Nov. 20 and returned Nov. 29.

Throughout the week, the College of Communications group—a mix of broadcast, multimedia and photojournalism students accompanied by three faculty members—chronicled the trip and shared their content with media outlets in Pennsylvania and beyond through a partnership with the Pennsylvania News Media Association.

Special: "Centre County Report in Cuba"

Curley Center in Cuba

In all, the students compiled:

  • nine text stories,
  • eight videos,
  • 53 photos and
  • produced three radio broadcasts of the games.

Curley Center pieces were published in 10 places, including MLB.com.

Along with the baseball games, the Penn State student-athletes attended cultural events and lectures by leading Cuban scholars, visited important historical sites, and traveled the countryside to get a glimpse of real Cuban life outside the tourist centers of Havana. On Thanksgiving Day, the team learned about the history of sport in Cuba with special guest Yosvany Aragón, a former star on the Cuban national baseball team.

Penn State baseball was the fourth U.S. collegiate contingent to visit Cuba this year. The Princeton track and field team traveled to Cuba in June, and the Coastal Carolina men's basketball squad visited in August. A group of Vanderbilt student-athletes and staff visited in July.

“We want students to get experiences here that are not possible anywhere else. And we are lucky enough to have quality students who can undertake such endeavors, grow personally and, at the same time, help news organizations by providing meaningful content.” — John Affleck, Knight Chair in Sports Journalism and Society and director of the Curley Center

Students prepared for the trip to Cuba for months without knowing until early in the fall semester whether the trip would get approval from the Cuban government. It is the second trip featuring students from the College of Communications in the past three years to Cuba. A separate group in an international reporting class traveled to Havana in 2014.

The students’ Thanksgiving “family” meal was conducted Nov. 20 at a hotel in Philadelphia before they left for Havana.

In the past, Penn State students have covered the Croke Park Classic, Super Bowl, Final Four and Olympics as part of similar endeavors. John Affleck, the Knight Chair in Sports Journalism and Society and director of the Curley Center, said the center is committed to providing real-time, professional experiences and covering events of cultural significance. “The trip to Havana could not come at a more important moment for U.S.-Cuba relations, and we are excited that we’ll be there to tell the story for everyone back in Pennsylvania,” he said.

Students gained valuable, real-world experience while covering a major event. Like other such trips, the mix of cultural and professional challenges exemplifies the goal of the Curley Center in preparing student sports journalists through unrivaled and thought-provoking opportunities.

“We want students to get experiences here that are not possible anywhere else,” said Affleck, who started planning another trip -- to the Paralympic Games in Rio in 2016 -- nearly a year ago. “And we are lucky enough to have quality students who can undertake such endeavors, grow personally and, at the same time, help news organizations by providing meaningful content.”

Cuba selfie
Cuba downpour

Internships

Potential Internships & Careers

Students in the Curley Center complete internships across the nation in a variety of roles. They work for leagues, news organizations and teams at the college and professional level gaining hands-on experience that helps shape their eventual career path.

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More Information

Office of Internships and Career Services
208 Carnegie Building
814.865.4349
cms324@psu.edu

Experiences and Facilities

Experiences

The combination of the Donald P. Bellisario College of Communications, one of the largest programs of its kind in the United States, and Penn State Intercollegiate Athletics provides fertile territory for aspiring sports journalists. What the Curley Center regularly offers often goes far beyond campus, though.

Students have covered the Croke Park Classic, NASCAR, the Final Four, the Olympics and the Super Bowl in recent years. Curley Center students even chronicled the historic trip by the Penn State baseball team to Cuba. Additionally, Curley Center students have gained valuable hands-on experience as regular selections for highly competitive national internships at organizations such as CBS Sports Network, ESPN, MLB.com and many more.

Facilities

The Curley Center has its own dedicated radio booth, classroom and workspace inside Medlar Field at Lubrano Park. Additionally, the Bellisario College facilities at Innovation Park provide access to two HD television studios and the studio space for CommRadio, our Internet-based radio station.

The Steve Jones Broadcasting Complex, accessible for students and used by networks for events on campus, is a state-of-the-art remote production facility. It enables students to hone their production skills using the same hardware as those in the industry. Housed in Rec Hall and named for the play-by-play voice of the Nittany Lions who also serves as an instructor in the Curley Center, the space provides unrivaled hands-on experience for students. Similar spaces exist — and are often staffed by Penn State students — in the Bryce Jordan Center and Pegula Ice Arena on campus.

Courses

Explore Issues and Trends in Sports Journalism

COMM 170 Introduction to the Sports Industry

Since 1987 the sports industry has grown from $50 billion to more than $200 billion, becoming one of the 10 leading industries in the United States. It is an industry unlike any other in its structure and operating principles. This course provides a basic understanding of how the principles of business apply in the industry of sports.

Foot traffic heading to Beaver Stadium before a football game

COMM 412 Sports Media and Society

This course is designed to help students more critically view the role of sport media in American culture. The influence of/relationship between sport media and issues such as race, gender, sexuality (homophobia), nationalism, capitalism/consumerism, violence and civic life will be examined. Issues in relation to journalism ethics and the production of sport media also will be examined.

  • Instructor:
Members of the media interviewing a football player.

COMM 476 Sports Writing

This is an upper-level course designed to prepare students to write sports stories for newspapers and magazines. Modern sports writing requires sportswriters to not only attend games and interview coaches, but also to use statistics, profile people and explore trends. Through a variety of assignments, the course will provide students with the experience that will prepare them for the demands of being modern sportswriters. And it will ground them in the ethical principles that all journalists must follow.

Student interviewing a Penn State wrestler

COMM 477 Sports Broadcasting

This is an upper-level course designed to prepare students to broadcast sports events and news. These specialized broadcasts -- including play-by-play, studio sportscasts, field reporting and features -- requires well-prepared and well-rounded students. Through many hands-on assignments, students will hone their sports broadcasting skills.

Foot traffic heading to Beaver Stadium before a football game

COMM 478 Sports Information

This is an upper-level course designed to prepare students for a specialized form of modern media relations -- sports information. Sports information professionals combine skills of both journalists and public relations specialists. Such professionals work for leagues, organizations or teams and serve audiences that include fans as well as sports media. With hands-on, practical exercises and experiences, the course will expose students to the demands and skills necessary to succeed as a sports information professional.

Foot traffic heading to Beaver Stadium before a football game

 

Certificate Program - Student Information

Requirements

To complete the program, students must meet the following requirements:

  1. Be accepted into the emphasis via application to the John Curley Center for Sports Journalism. Applications for the Curley Center accepted each fall semester, and applications are available online. APPLY HERE
    Students MUST complete COMM 260W before they can apply to the Curley Center.
  2. Complete the mandatory major credit hours required for a bachelor's degree in communications. Most applicants are journalism or public relations majors.
  3. Earn a minimum of six credits from COMM 476, 477 and/or 478 and complete an on-campus sports media activity (ComRadio, Daily Collegian, WKPS-FM "The Lion," Intercollegiate Athletics).
  4. Complete an  on- or off-campus internship in sports media.

Applications

Applications for the John Curley Center for Sports Journalism are accepted each fall semester. 

Juniors and seniors are encouraged to submit the application as soon as possible. All majors are welcome to apply.

Students must complete COMM 260W before they can apply to the program. 

CLICK HERE TO APPLY

Questions?

Jamey Perry
814-865-1503
jrp5@psu.edu

Scholarships

Thanks to support provided by the Ridge Riley Journalism Scholarship in Sports Writing and the George E. Paterno Memorial Scholarship Fund, top students who choose to specialize in sports journalism may earn support for their studies.

General Scholarship Information

Alumni

Hundreds of Donald P. Bellisario College of Communications and Penn State alumni hold positions in sports journalism and related fields. A partial list includes:

  • Paul Alexander, Root Sports
  • Marty Aronoff, ESPN/Fox Sports*
  • Mark Ashenfelter, ESPN
  • Blake Berson, CBS Sports Network
  • Laila Brock, College Football Playoff
  • Jennifer Bullano, Pittsburgh Penguins*
  • Judson Burch, ESPN*
  • Jim Buzinski, Outsports*
  • Cathy Bongiovi, University of Akron
  • Paul Casella, MLB.com
  • Gene Collier, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
  • Melanie Collins,
    Yahoo Sports/Golf Channel/CBS Sports
  • Kurt Deichert, Fox Sports Southwest
  • Dustin Dopirak, Knoxville News-Sentinel
  • Gerry Dulac, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
  • Sean Fitz, 24/7 Sports
  • Matt Fortuna, ESPN.com
  • Deb Gelman, CBS Sports*
  • Pete Gergely, New York Yankees
  • Amanda Gifford Lockwood, ESPN Radio*
  • Evan Harris, Spike TV
  • Scott Horner, Octagon*
  • Ryan Hockensmith, ESPN
  • Pete Jensen, NHL.com
  • Kimberly Jones, NFL Network
  • Sheil Kapadia, ESPN
  • Emily Kaplan, Sports Illustrated*
  • Rob King, ESPN
  • Pete Kowalski, U.S. Golf Association
  • Matt Millen, Fox Sports/Big Ten Network
  • Mike Missanelli, 97.5 The Fanatic
  • Nate Mink, Syracuse Media Group
  • Sweeny Murti, WFAN/SNY
  • Dana O’Neil, ESPN
  • Will Pakutka, New York Daily News
  • Marisol Renner, Baltimore Ravens
  • Quinn Roberts, MLB.com
  • Michael Robinson, NFL Network*
  • Rob Roselli, Rutgers University
  • Rich Russo, Fox Sports*
  • Lisa Salters, ESPN
  • Eric Scarcella, Reading Phillies
  • Jared Shanker, ESPN
  • Michael Signora, National Football League
  • Audrey Snyder, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
  • Wayne Staats, Augusta Chronicle
  • Larry Tiscornia, Major League Soccer
  • Tom Verducci, Sports Illustrated/Fox Sports*
  •  Jenny Vrentas, Sports Illustrated
  • Michel Weinreb, Author/Writer*
  •  John Weiss, NFL Films
  • Mark Wogenrich, Allentown Morning Call
  • Mike Wolf, Big Ten Network
  • Rodnell Workman, New York Cosmos

*-Member of Advisory Council

 

Alumni Council

A 12-member group of alumni serves as an advisory group and resource for the Curley Center overall, and for its students specifically. Members include:

  • Marty Aronoff – A 1960 graduate and a Penn State Alumni Fellow, Aronoff serves as a sports statistician for major TV networks, covering Major League Baseball, the NBA, NFL and major college basketball and football. He logs more than 300,000 miles of travel each year.
  • Jennifer Bullano – A 2003 advertising/public relations graduate, Bullano serves as the senior director of communications for the Pittsburgh Penguins. She is the only female to hold her position in the NHL.
  • Judson Burch – A 1992 journalism graduate, Burch is a senior coordinating producer at ESPN.
  • Jim Buzinski – A 1980 journalism graduate, Buzinski is the co-founder of Outsports.com, a website devoted to LGBT sports fans and athletes. The site is run by SB Nation.
  • Deb Gelman – A 1991 broadcast-cable graduate, Gelman is a producer/director who works extensively with CBS Sports on both NFL coverage and the NCAA basketball tournament. An Emmy Award-winning talent, she also serves as president of Creative Spark Productions.
  • Amanda Gifford Lockwood – A 2004 journalism graduate, Gifford Lockwood is a senior director for the ESPN Radio Network, overseeing sports talk programming to millions of sports fans nationwide.
  • Scott Horner – A 2002 advertising/public relations graduate, Horner is a senior director of the North American Sales and Marketing Group for Octagon, a leader in sports marketing, talent representation, event management, entertainment marketing and research.
  • Emily Kaplan – A 2013 journalism graduate, Kaplan is a staff writer for Sports Illustrated, producing content for The MMQB.
  • Michael Robinson – An advertising/public relations (2004) and journalism (2005) graduate, Robinson is a studio analyst for the NFL Network and the Big Ten Network. He played football for Penn State and went on to a career in the NFL with the San Francisco 49ers and the Seattle Seahawks.
  • Rich Russo – A 1984 graduate of Penn State, Russo serves as the lead NFL director for Fox Sports and directs many other sports as well, including MLB, NASCAR, college basketball and college football. Russo has directed multiple Super Bowl broadcasts.
  • Tom Verducci – A 1982 journalism graduate, Verducci is a senior writer for Sports Illustrated and is an analyst for Fox Sports and MLB Network. He's a two-time Emmy Award winner for his television work and was named National Sportswriter of the Year by the National Sportscasters and Sportswriters Association in January 2015.
  • Michael Weinreb – A 1994 journalism graduate, Weinreb is a writer and author who contributes to publications including Rolling Stone. He was a writer for the former ESPN sports feature site Grantland.com.

 

About

Studio Photo of John Curley in a dress shirt and tie
John Curley

The John Curley Center for Sports Journalism explores issues and trends in sports journalism through instruction, outreach, programming and research.

The Curley Center's undergraduate curricular emphasis includes courses in sports writing, covering the business of sports, sports data, sports broadcasting and sports information. Along with core courses, the Curley Center places an emphasis on internships and hands-on experience with broadcast, multimedia and print outlets as well as weith league, sport and team publicity operations.

In September 2005, the Center was awarded a $1.5 million grant from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation to establish the Knight Chair in Sports Journalism and Society.

The Center was established in 2003. It was named the John Curley Center for Sports Journalism in September 2006, honoring Curley, whose more than five decades of newspaper experience included work as a reporter, editor, publisher and, ultimately, president, CEO and chairman of the Gannet Co. He was the first editor of USA Today.

Undergraduate Curriculum

Undergraduate Curriculum in Sports Journalism

The Curley Center's undergraduate curricular emphasis includes courses in sports writing, covering the business of sports, sports data, sports broadcasting and sports information. Also, a course on sports and public policy is cross-listed with the Penn State Dickinson School of Law.

Internships

Internships in Sports Journalism

The Curley Center's approach includes a strong emphasis on internships. Whether at national organizations (CBS Sports Network, ESPN, MLB.com) or at campus outlets (ComMedia, The Daily Collegian and many more), hands-on opportunities are vital.

Center Highlights

The first on-campus guest lecture conducted under the auspices of the Center featured John Walsh, senior vice president and executive editor of ESPN, in 2003. Since then, the varied group of events and visitors has included broadcasting legends Bob Costas and Brent Musburger and regular meetings of Associated Press sports editors from the region on campus. Some recent highlights follow ...

October 2016

  • Nine students from the Curley Center travel with four faculty members to cover the Rio Paralympics for The Associated Press. Paralympics Coverage
  • Rob King, senior vice president of "SportsCenter" and news for ESPN, presents a free public lecture and meets with classes during a campus visit.

June 2016

  • A team of Curley Center students covers the the U.S. Open at Oakmont Country Club as part of a partnership with the USA TODAY Network. 

Feburary 2016

  • Veteran NBA reporter Marc Spears of Yahoo! Sports focuses on "Covering Race, Covering Sports" during an on-campus visit and free public lecture as part of the Conversation Series.
  • Trio of Curley Center students get experience at Super Bowl 50 as one student works with the NFL media relations team and two others cover the game and all that surrounds it for ComMedia.

November 2015

A team of Curley Center students chronicles the Penn State baseball team's historic trip to Cuba as part of a partnership with the Pennsylvania NewsMedia Association.

September 2015

Knight Chair and Curley Center director John Aflfleck hosts panel at Schlow Library in State College titled "The Sport of Sportswriting" Panelists include: Harvey Araton of The New York Times, Nancy Armour of USA Today, Filip Bondy of the New York Daily News and author Michael Weinreb, a Penn State alumnus who has writted several books and also contributes regularly to Rolling Stone and other publications.

August 2014

Curley Center students partner with the Pennsylvania NewsMedia Assocation to cover the Croke Park Classic and related events in Ireland.

January 2014

The Curley Center, in conjunction with Investigative Reporters and Editors, hosts a weekend training session on campus.

November 2013

The Curley Center welcomes Jesse Washington, national writer on race and ethnicity for The Associated Press, for a free public session titled "White Ballers, Black Dreamers and Indian Mascots: Covering Race in American Sports” that attracted a standing-room only audience on campus.

September 2013

Author John U. Bacon visits campus to discuss his book about college football, "Fourth and Long."

August 2013

John Affleck, an editor and reporter more than two decades of experience at The Associated Press, becomes the Knight Chair in Sports Journalism and Society. STORY

April 2013

  • Penn State and the Curley Center play host to the annual regional meeting of the Associated Press Sports Editors. 
  • Summer internships begin for the two most recent Penn State students selected through the MLB internship program. STORY

March 2013

The Curley Center honors John Branch of The New York Times with the annual Award for Excellence in Coverage of Youth Sports. LINK

January 2013

The Curley Center welcomes Eric Collins of the Big Ten Network for an on-campus session with students. He serves as keynote speaker for an informational student session conducted at the Bryce Jordan Center before the Michigan State-Penn State men's basketball game.

September 2012

  • The Curley Center conducts a free public session titled "The Future of the NCAA and Its Membership," with a panel that includes two former NCAA presidents. The session at The State Theatre in State College attracts more than 300 people and gets streamed live online. LINK
  • Sports writer Joe Posnanski, author of "Paterno," visits Penn State for a session sponsored by the Curley Center and discusses his book and the issues surrounding. VIDEO (Part 1) / VIDEO (Part 2)

News Coverage

August 2012

Students from the Curley Center work the the U.S. Olympic Committee and provide exclusive coverage of the Olympic Games in London. They also maintain a blog with their insights and opinions and stories about Penn Staters at the Games.
STORY / BLOG

July 2012

  • Knight Chair Malcolm Moran shares insights during a "Penn State Special Report" that airs on the Big Ten Network (July 13, 2012)
  • "Montclair's Emily Kaplan is Olympics-Bound, As Reporter" STORY
  • "Olympics Popular Among Women" and "Why Women Watch the Olympics" focus on research by Curley Center Associate Director Marie Hardin
    phys.org STORY (July 6, 2012) counselheal.com STORY

June 2012

  • Curley Center fenior sellow John Nichols talks about "College Athletics' Broken Model" in The Washington Post STORY
  • Curley Center associate director Marie Hardin writes about Title IX in monthly Curley Center commentary COLUMN
  • PSU Grad Snyder Wins Flamminio Scholarship STORY

May 2012

Knight Chair Malcolm Moran writes "Skowron Has a Knack for Making Memories" in The New York Times STORY

April 2012

  • Curley Center associate director Maire Hardin writes "Winning the Sports Beat: Female Writers Need Wide Angle Lens" for On The Issues Magazine. STORY
  • Rob Rossi of the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review accepts Award for Excellence in Coverage of Youth Sports during on-campus ceremony.
  • Senior Audrey Snyder was part of a team from the Reading Eagle (Division II, circulation 40,000-74,999) that was honored with a Keystone Press Award. The team earned second place in the division for its coverage of the firing of Joe Paterno.

March 2012

  • Alumni Mark Viera ('09 Journ) and Wayne Staats ('10 Journ) place among winners in the Associated Press Sports Editors competition. Viera, with Pete Thamel of The New York Times, places first in the Breaking News category among papers with a circulation of more than 175,000. Staats, of the Augusta (Ga.) Chronicle, finishes fifth in the Breaking News category among papers with a circulation of 30,000 to 70,000.
  • Newspaper series on concussions earns Award for Excellence in Coverage of Youth Sports STORY
  • Knight Chair Malcolm Moran earns Jake Wade Award from CoSIDA STORY
  • One of the sports anchors for student-produced TV shows in the College of Communications was named the best in the nation. STORY

January 2012

  • Knight Chair Malcolm Moran writes "Paterno lived and died with football" for The Philadelphia Inquirer
  • Faculty members, including Knight Chair Malcolm Moran, discuss Joe Paterno's death, impact with The Chronicle of Higher Education STORY
  • ComRadio's Patrick Woo and Willie Jungels interview Washington Post columnist Sally Jenkins regarding her interview and subsequent story about Joe Paterno.
  • Knight Chair Malcolm Moran appears on "Basketball and Beyond with Coach K" on Mad Dog Radio and discusses the appointment of Bill O'Brien as the Penn State football coach. AUDIO
  • BCS Logo 2012Knight Chair Malcolm Moran serves as the pool reporter to speak with officials, if necessary, for the fourth consecutive BCS Championship Game. (It was not necessary.)
  • Two Curley Center students prepare to cover Bowl Championship Series national championship game. STORY

December 2011

Knight Chair Malcolm Moran provides some perspective about the ongoing news at Penn State, and the work of students during the situation. an on-campus session. STORY

November 2011

  • Knight Chair Malcolm Moran moderates an on-campus session, "A Conversation About Covering Controversy," featuring: Mark Viera of The New York Times; Sarah Ganim of the Patriot-News from Harrisburg, Pa.; Jerry Micco of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette; Christine Brennan of USA Today; and Jeremy Schaap of ESPN.
  • Knight Chair Malcolm Moran quoted in The Philadelphia Inquirer and appears on variety of radio/TV outlets regarding Penn State situation.
  • Numerous Curley Center alumni drive local, regional and national coverage of the Penn State situation.

October 2011

  • Five Penn State journalism students provide daily coverage of the 16th Pan Am Games as part of an exclusive partnership between the Curley Center and the U.S. Olympic Committee.
  • Basketball experts Jim O'Connell of the Associated Press and Mike Breen of ESPN/ABC make classroom presentations and participate in an evening lecture and question-and-answer session.
  • An online chat addresses "Issues in Covering Initial Eligibility" with Coquese Washington, Penn State women's basketball coach, and Steve Weiberg of USA Today.

August 2011

  • Researchers at Penn State and a study by the Coalition on Intercollegiate Athletics find best practices for academic integrity often go unused STORY (Aug. 30, 2011)

July 2011

  • Difference MakersCurley Center alumnus Matt Fortuna, an associate reporter for MLB.com, covers Derek Jeter's 3,000th hit on July 9. STORY

June 2011

  • "Difference Makers: Life Lessons with Paterno and Krzyzewski" airs June 30 on ESPN and ESPNU.
  • An ESPN taping of the special "Differnce Makers: Life Lessons with Paterno and Krzyzewski" takes place June 20 at Eisenhower Auditorium. Hosted by Rece Davis of ESPN, the session features Penn State football coach Joe Paterno and Duke men's basketball coach Mike Krzyzewski, as well as Jay Bilas, Matt Millen, Michael Robinson and Jay Williams. The on-campus portion of the event was sponsored by the Curley Center
  • Curley Center advisory board member Ken Denlinger writes a commentary about sports journalism ethics as part of the Center's monthly series of commentaries.

May 2011

  • Six Penn State students -- the most from any college or university in the nation -- began summer internships with mlb.com, covering individual teams and working in the organization's digital headquarters. Reporters and their summer assignments are: Paul Casella, Chicago White Sox; A.J. Cassavell, Los Angeles Dodgers; Matt Fortuna, New York Yankees; Nate Mink, Philadelphia Phillies; Audrey Snyder, Milwaukee Brewers; and Jeffrey Lowe, who will be working with the overall digital operation.
  • Curley Center advisory board member Jon Jackson writes a commentary about reporters and "spin" as part of the Center's monthly series of commentaries.
  • Curley Center advisory board member Dana O'Neil of espn.com writes about locker room access for women in "Tipoff," the U.S. Basketball Writers Association newsletter.

April 2011

  • A meeting of regional members of the Associated Press Sports Editors was conducted April 18 on campus.
  • The presentation of the Award for Excellence in the Coverage of Youth Sports to George Dohrmann was conducted April 15 at the Nittany Lion Inn.

March 2011

  • Final Four 2011Two senior journalism majors and students in the Curley Center, Matt Fortuna and Nate Mink, provided coverage of the Final Four for NCAA.org throughout the event in Houston. That work (part of an exclusive relationship with the NCAA facilitated by Knight Chair Malcolm Moran) and other stories were also featured on Final Four Focus 2011. The opportunity for the student journalists is expected to be part of an annual relationship between the Curley Center and the NCAA at the Final Four.
  • The Curley Center conducts the annual "Full Court Press" sports writing seminar at the Final Four in Houston. Moderated by Knight Chair Malcolm Moran, the panel includes Bryan Burwell of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Pat Forde of ESPN.com and Jim O'Connell of The Associated Press. Students who attend the session are then credentialed to cover one of the initial days of the Final Four, either Thursday or Friday.
  • The Curley Center conducts its fourth online chat, "Ethical Issues in Coverage of Youth Sports," featuring Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter George Dohrmann, Steve Barr of Little League Baseball and Tracy Greer of the North Country Times.

February 2011

  • Alumna Lisa Salters of ABC/ESPN returns to campus for a presentation coordinated by the All-Sports Museum at Beaver Stadium as part of its programming for Black History Month.
  • The Curley Center conducts is third and, to date, most popular, live online chat. The session addresses "Issues in Covering Recruiting."

January 2011

  • Tom Verducci conversationNearly 200 people converge on the HUB-Robeson Center Auditorium on Jan. 25 for "A Conversation with Tom Verducci," as Knight Chair Malcolm Moran spends an hour discussing sports journalism with Sports Illustrated senior writer Tom Verducci, a Penn State alumnus.
  • "Megamoney Comes from Megadonors at OU and Auburn," an Associated Press by Eddie Pellis regarding the BCS Championship Game participants includes prominent opinion and quotes from retired Penn State communications professor John S. Nichols (Jan. 6, 2011)
  • Senior journalism major Matt Fortuna received honorable mention recognition in the Best Writing Contest sponsored by the Football Writers Association of America. He is the first writer from a student publication to be honored in at least the last 10 contests. His story about the return of former Penn State player Jerome Hayes from multiple knee injuries was entered in the Features category. Steve Richardson, the association's executive director, said he was not aware of another student being honored in the 18-year history of the contest. Fortuna was recognized Monday at the annual FWAA breakfast in Scottsdale, Ariz. After serving as a football beat reporter for The Daily Collegian during the 2009 season, Fortuna covered Penn State football and other sports for the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review last year. He will return for a second season as an associate reporter for mlb.com this summer. He covered the Pittsburgh Pirates last year. His assignment for 2011 will be covering the New York Yankees.
  • Knight Chair Malcolm Moran, director of the Curley Center, was selected to serve at the pool reporter for the BCS Championship Game for the third year in a row in the event that the officials need to explain a ruling on the field or in the replay booth.

December 2010

  • Knight Chair Malcolm Moran, director of the Center, and alumnus Mark Viera have articles appear side-by-side in sports section of The New York Times on Dec. 19.
  • Knight Chair Malcolm Moran and Marie Hardin, associate professor and associate director of the Curley Center, contribute articles to Nieman Reports Sports, a publication of the Nieman Foundation for Journalism at Harvard University.

November 2010

  • Award-winning on-air talent Leah Secondo, who has handled play-by-play and color commentary duties for outlets such as the Big Ten Network, CBS College Sports, Fox Sports Net and ESPNU meets with students on campus.

November 2010

  • Second Curley Center Chat, "The Intersection Between Fantasy Sports and Sports Coverage: Implications for Journalists and Predictions for Media Organizations," an online panel discussion, features Joe Dolan of fantasyguru.com and Sirius Satellite Radio; Nate Ravitz, deputy editor for ESPN.com Fantasy Sports; Alexandre Simon, senior director of digital business development for the National Hockey League; and Malcolm Moran.
  • Knight Chair Malcolm Moran participates and the Curley Center helps coordinate three tapings of the television show "Expert Opinion with Graham Spanier" at the Newseum in Washington, D.C. The shows, which will air on the Big Ten Network, include a one-on-one interview with Penn State President Graham Spanier and Mark Emmert, president of the NCAA.

October 2010

  • Alumnus Mark Viera ('09) writes an article for The New York Times about paralyzed Rutgers football player Eric LeGrand, featuring Penn State football player Adam Taliaferro, who recovered from a similar injury.
  • Knight Chair Malcolm Moran participates in a panel discussion titled "Journalism and its Coverage of the Steroid Crisis" at the University of Texas.
  • Initial Curley Center Chat: "Who Should be in the Press Box and Why? Issues in Credentialing Bloggers and Journalists," an online panel discussion, features Michael Signora of the NFL, Jerry Micco of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette and Knight Chair Malcolm Moran.
  • Alumnus Rich Frank, director of advertising and new media for the Baltimore Orioles, visits campus for a variety of classroom sessions, addressing the sports industry and the differences between consumer marketing and sports marketing, as well the importance and use of social media and other marketing approaches for professional sports.

September 2010

  • Michael Oriard, Distinguished Professor of American Literature and Culture at Oregon State University, and a former walk-on football player and eventual team captain at Notre Dame, presents "A Conversation About College Football, Past and Present" on Sept. 24 during a session with faculty, staff and students interested in sports and sports journalism. Earlier in the day, he was the featured speaker at the Penn State Forum, addressing a similar topic.
  • ESPN Radio's "The Herd with Colin Cowherd" broadcasts live from campus. In addition, Cowherd tapes the TV show "SportsNation" live from campus with broadcast partner Michelle Beadle.
  • Knight Chair Malcolm Moran speaks to undergraduates, graduate students, faculty members and staff members at the student newspaper at the University of Alabama. The sessions were organized by Dr. Jennifer Greer, chair of the journalism department in the College of Communication and Information Sciences. In addition, he serves as a guest on an hour-long television program on WVUA-TV in advance of the Penn State-Alabama football game.

July 2010

  • Curley Center board member Charles Pittman authors an op-ed piece about football coach Joe Paterno for the South Bend Tribune.
  • Knight Chair Malcolm Moran and Marie Hardin, associate director of the Curley Center, participate in an AEJMC Hot Topics online chat titled "Sports and Social Media: Issues and Predictions." Hardin moderates the session while Moran serves as one of the panelists for the event.

April 2010

  • "Full Court Press," annual U.S. Basketball Writers Association of America session for high school and college journalists at the site of the Final Four, coordinated by the John Curley Center for Sports Journalism on April 1. Session includes: Steve Carp of Las Vegas Review Journal; Jim O'Connell of the Associated Press; Dana O'Neil of ESPN.com; and Shannon Shelton of the Detroit Free Press. Session moderated by Knight Chair Malcolm Moran.

March 2010

  • Baseball writer Jayson Stark of ESPN participated in the annual Foster Conference of Distinguished Writers on March 24.
  • Knight Chair Malcolm Moran was quoted in a USA Today article about the NCAA Tournament that appeared on the cover of the paper's March 18 edition.

February 2010

  • Knight Chair Malcolm Moran, director of the Curley Center for Sports Journalism, and Marie Hardin, associate director of the Center, taped segments of "Expert Opinion," which is hosted by Penn State President Graham Spanier and airs on the Big Ten Network.
  • Marie Hardin discusses women in sports as a guest on "To the Point."

December 2009

  • Penn State and the College of Communications again played host to the annual Associate Press Sports Editors meeting.
  • Over a three-day period, John Lowe, of the Detroit Free Press, president of the Baseball Writers Association of America, met with students in class, conducted a separate session with Penn State's numerous candidates for internships with MLB.com and participated in an installment of the Curley Center's signature Conversation Series.

November 2009

  • "A Conversation with Michael Aresco" provided a programming highlight on Nov. 13 as Curley Center Director Malcolm Moran talked with Michael Aresco, the executive vice president of CBS Sports in Carnegie Cinema.

October 2009

  • Both Curley Center Director Malcolm Moran and Associate Director Marie Hardin were part of separate panel discussions taped for television by the Big Ten Network as part of the regular "Expert Opinion" series hosted by Penn State President Graham Spanier

September 2009

  • George Bodenheimer at IPDuring a jam-packed day with students, faculty and staff from the College of Communications, ESPN President George Bodenheimer (right) started things with a breakfast meeting with Knight Chair Malcolm Moran and Marie Hardin, associate director of the Center for Sports Journalism. Later in the day (after a presentation to some 350 Penn State faculty and staff during the Penn State Forum at the Nittany Lion Inn), Bodenheimer visited the Division of Broadcasting facilities, featuring ComRadio studios and the television studio. He met with students who lead ComRadio, on air and behind the scenes, and with Thor Wasbotton and his students who put together the weekly "Centre County Report" TV news program.
  • Students meet with Big East Conference associate commissioner John Paquette during sports writing classes on campus.

August 2009

  • Mark SilvermanStudents get the opportunity to meet with Big Ten Network President Mark Silverman during a special session conducted the John Curley Center for Sports Journalism at the Nittany Lion Inn.
  • An article titled "Most bloggers aspire to higher standard" appears in Aug. 24-30 edition (Vol, 12, Issue 17) of Sports Business Journal detailing recent research about sports bloggers conducted by the John Curley Center for Sports Journalism.

July 2009

  • A series of three "Expert Opinion" programs focusing on sports make their debut in July on the Big Ten Network. Malcolm Moran, the Knight Chair for Sports Journalism and Society, and director of the Center for Sports Journalism, appears as a guest on one of the shows and helped coordinate guest for all of the programs, which are hosted by Penn State President Graham Spanier. The shows begin airing July 9 on the Big Ten Network.

May 2009

  • On May 23 in Philadelphia, Malcolm Moran and Marie Hardin led a session titled "Head of the Class: Crossing Over Into Academia" at the Association for Women in Sports Media convention. The session was designed to introduce sports journalists to the basics for moving into adjunct or full-time teaching at the college level.

April 2009

  • Chris FowlerOn April 24, ESPN "College GameDay" host Chris Fowler participated in a "conversation" and question-and-answer session with students from the Center. The well-attended session was followed by a news conference with local members of the media for Fowler. Because his visit to campus came the day before the annual Blue-White Game, he visit was especially timely. 
  • An April 19 trip to PNC Park provided the opportunity for sports writing students to cover a Pittsburgh Pirates baseball game and meet with beat writers and team officials regarding the relationship between the media and a team.
  • An April 2 article in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette about the move of western Pennsylvania native John Calipari to Kentucky quoted Malcolm Moran about the long history of high-pay for college coaches.

March 2009

  • In mid-March, Marie Hardin presented "Growing Pains: Women, Sports and the Media" during a special public session at the Penn State All-Sports Museum. She also served as a panelist on disability and gender issues during a symposium at Widener University School of Law on March 16.
  • On March 13 at the Big Ten Men's Basketball Tournament, the Center for Sports Journalism coordinated a student journalist seminar. Panelists for the session, created exclusively for student journalists, addressed everything from access at events to advice on career paths.
  • Author and Sports Illustrated writer Michael Bamberger participated in the Foster Conference of Distinguished Writers on campus. His morning session March 4 was attended by more than 300 people.
  • A columnist from The New York Times includeD the perspective of Marie Hardin, the Center's associate director, in a March 3 story about the Alex Rodriguez case--and accompanying media coverage. STORY

February 2009

  • A columnist from Newsday features a perspective from Knight Chair Malcolm Moran and the Center for Sports Journalism regarding the media's duty in the Alex Rodriguez case. STORY
  • A crowd with a mix of students, University faculty and staff and members of the community attended the Feb. 19 event -- "A Conversation with John Feinstein" in the Forum Building.
  • Several Penn State alumni from the College of Communications and members of the John Curley Center for Sports Journalism played important roles during Super Bowl XLIII. Those people hold positions with the NFL, as members of the media or as members of companies that support media groups. A story on Penn State Live documented the involvement.

January 2009

  • Knight Chair Malcom Moran asked to create an ethics policy for members of the Football Writers Association of America. He also served as the pool reporter for the BCS Championship Game in Miami and was assigned to speak to game officials in the event of a controversy that affected the outcome of the game. Additionally, at the recently completed NCAA Convention, Moran became secretary-treasurer of the Forum for the Scholarly Study of Intercollegiate Athletics in Higher Education and will serve on the group's board of directors through 2011. Also at the Convention, he was part of a panel discussion titled "Engaging Your Local Division II Media: Building Relationships and Telling Great Stories."
  • On Jan. 23, students visited studios and met with officials and on-air talent at MLB-TV in New Jersey. As part of that same trip, students visited the Yogi Berra Museum for baseball-related panel discussions featuring major-marked broadcasters and writers.

Knight Chair in Sports Journalism and Society

John AffleckJohn Affleck, a veteran journalist with a track record of success as a national manager in both sports and news at The Associated Press, joined the College of Communications faculty in August 2013 as the Knight Chair in Sports Journalism and Society and director of the John Curley Center for Sports Journalism.

Since joining the faculty, Affleck has focused on giving students with a classroom experience that will prepare them to step right into a newsroom and perform well. He does this by providing attentive editing, practical tips, on-campus reporting assignments and an accent on working with the latest storytelling tools.

Affleck has directed students on independent studies and major projects that have been professionally published, and created Curley Center news bureaus to cover events such as the Croke Park Classic -- Penn State’s 2014 football opener in Dublin -- and a NASCAR Sprint Cup race in the Poconos for professional organizations. His goal is to regularly put Penn State students into situations where they can gain experience and have a positive impact on the journalism industry even as they earn their undergraduate degrees.

Affleck has brought a mix of speakers to campus who are stars in the field (Sports Illustrated’s Peter King, for example) as well as those who have a perspective on sports issues of the day such as Indian mascots, and the dearth of openly gay and lesbian athletes in the top U.S. team sports. He also regularly writes for publication himself and appears as a guest on radio programs, discussing major sports and sports media issues. In 2014-15, he served as the faculty adviser to the campus chapter of the Association for Women in Sports Media.

During his 22-year career at the AP, Affleck served as a reporter, editor and national manager, working regularly with all of the organization’s major editorial departments. In his final role before joining the University faculty, he helped manage day-to-day operations for the roughly 70-member domestic sports team. He also directed coverage of the Lance Armstrong saga, ran the Sport Department’s enterprise work, and coordinated efforts with the news department as the Jerry Sandusky case unfolded.

Affleck also directed coverage of college football, including the last five Bowl Championship Series national title games. He also oversaw the wire service’s 2013 Final Four coverage and was a key editor at the World Cup in South Africa, and at the Summer Olympics in Sydney and Athens.

Reporters and projects under Affleck’s direct supervision have been honored in dozens of regional and national contests, and have earned awards from a wide array of groups, including the nation’s education writers, religion reporters and the lesbian and gay journalists association. Work under his guidance has captured the AP’s top internal prizes for news enterprise, sports enterprise and sports features.

Affleck began his AP career in Albany, N.Y., cranking out leads on college football and basketball as well as minor league hockey and baseball from his slot on the night desk. He later reported from the state Capitol and then ran the offices in Buffalo, N.Y., and Cleveland before moving to the organization’s main office in New York.  He brings an appreciation of journalism fundamentals and an understanding of the need for innovation in the changing multimedia journalism environment to his position.

Affleck grew up in Syracuse, N.Y., and has been a competitive runner for most of his life, once finishing in the Top 500 at the Boston Marathon. He was ranked nationally as a master’s competitor by USATF in four events (800 meters, 1,500 meters, 3,000 meters and the mile) as recently as 2005. He is married to Jessica Ancker, an associate professor at the Center for Healthcare Informatics and Policy at Weill Cornell Medical College in New York City.

Research Groups & Programs

Alumni Notes

Ben Rupp

Ben Rupp (2002, Journalism),

accepted a position as a Senior Major Gift Officer at Millersville University in Millersville, Pa. Ben, Karla (wife), and sons CJ (6) and Calvin (1) live in Landisville, Pa.

Chelsea Sweithelm (2012, Advertising/Public Relations),

was promoted to senior communications analyst at Highmark Inc.

Jen Lemanski

Jen Lemanski (2004, Advertising/Public Relations),

was named as one of Houston Business Journal's 40 Under 40 for 2017. She is the practice growth senior manager for Pannell Kerr Forster of Texas, P.C. (PKF Texas), a middle market accounting and advisory firm in Houston. She is also a national board member of the Association for Accounting Marketing. Lemanski recently completed three terms as…

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